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Dylann Roof Gets Death Sentence

I have a great idea – let his Trumpazoid ass out in Gen Pop for a while…Before they hang him.

Dylann Roof Sentenced to Death, Asked for Mercy but Showed No Remorse

The racist killer asked for his life to be spared but said he had no regrets about murdering nine black worshipers in Bible study.

Dylann Roof will be executed for shooting dead nine worshipers during a Bible study in a historically black church, making him the first person sentenced to death for federal hate crimes.

A 12-person jury returned the sentence Tuesday at the Charleston Federal Courthouse after deliberating for three hours. The punishment follows Roof’s conviction in December on 33 charges related to the massacre at Emanuel A.M.E. Church on June 17, 2015.

Roof listened to the sentence without much expression, occasionally putting on a closed-lip smile that looked like a nervous reaction.

Roof’s murder of the parishioners shocked a public already nauseated by mass shootings in seemingly every place imaginable by introducing a new setting for bloodshed: church. His victims ranged in age from 26 to 87 and included a pastor and state senator, family matriarchs and patriarchs, a retired teacher, a track coach and speech therapist, a librarian, two mothers of teenage children, and a young college graduate.

Two women and two children survived the shooting by hiding under a desk and table as 77 bullets flew through the basement walls and victims’ bodies that evening at the conclusion of Bible study, the gunfire erupting from Roof’s Glock .45 just as the group closed their eyes and stood to pray. Another woman was spared by Roof. He told her she could live in order to tell others of the killings.

“Did I shoot you yet?” Polly Sheppard recalled Roof asking her as he pointed a gun at her body. “I’m not going to,” Roof said. “I need you to tell the story.”

Assorted observers, aghast at the consequences of Roof’s ruthless shooting rampage, sought to counteract his actions through public displays of unity and love. At Roof’s bond hearing two days after the shooting, numerous relatives of the shooting victims drew on their religious faith and told the then-21-year-old defendant they forgave him. Meanwhile, Charleston residents gathered at public vigils to honor the dead and promote a message of unity, at one point marching across Charleston’s iconic Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge by the thousands.

President Obama traveled to Charleston for the funeral of Rev. Clementa Pinckney, 41, who was also a South Carolina state senator. Obama eulogized Pinckney and, to much acclaim, then broke into song, leading a soulful rendition of “Amazing Grace.” Weeks later South Carolina leaders removed the Confederate flag from the grounds of the statehouse in the capital, Columbia, and relocated the banner to a museum. Regarded by many as a symbol of hate and intolerance, the flag was featured in many pictures Roof took of himself with guns before committing his crime in Charleston.

But as all these groups of people sought to promote healing in a nation continually fractured by gun violence and racial conflicts, Roof sat in a jail cell in Charleston and wrote a nearly 40-page statement that offered no apologies and denigrated almost every race of people on this earth, including white people whom he deemed “cowards” for not standing up to Roof’s perceived assaults by the “lower races.” This statement, along with drawings filled with racist symbols, complemented another racist manifesto Roof posted online on the afternoon before his crime.

During Tuesday’s sentencing proceedings, Roof, dressed in a green sweater and speaking softly as he represented himself in court, addressed the jury considering his fate, saying that while “I didn’t have to do anything… I felt like I had to do it and I still feel like I had to do it.” He mostly avoided talking about his crime and victims, offering no remorse, but conceding, “I think that, ummm, it’s safe to say no one in their right mind wants to go in a church and kill people.”

Roof then disputed the government’s depiction of him as a man filled with hatred, especially for black people.

“Wouldn’t it be fair to say the prosecution hates me since they’re trying to give me the death penalty?” Roof asked.

“My point is,” he continued, “anyone who hates anything in their mind has a good reason for it.”

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Grim Sleeper to be Put to Sleep

One of the few times the Death Penalty is justified in my view…

Lonnie Franklin Jr.

Jurors vote for death sentence for ‘Grim Sleeper’ serial killer

A Los Angeles County jury decided Monday that the man known as the “Grim Sleeper” serial killer should be put to death, closing an important legal chapter in the grisly slayings of at least nine women and one teenage girl that terrorized South L.A. for more than two decades.

The verdict against Lonnie David Franklin Jr., a 63-year-old former sanitation worker, drew muted sighs of relief in the downtown courtroom from victims’ relatives who were passing tissues back and forth, letting slight sobs go as each victim’s name was read aloud. Franklin, wearing a yellow dress shirt and neck tie that he put on as he entered the courtroom, appeared to remain stoic as he has the entire trial.

He was convicted last month of 10 murders between 1985 and 2007 but authorities believe he is responsible for more. Jurors rejected defense arguments that he should spend the rest of his life in prison rather than face execution.

The victims’ bodies were often dumped naked on roadsides or among trash in humiliating fashion, and the victims were all initially listed as Jane Does, leaving the killings unconnected for decades.

During the penalty phase of the trial, prosecutors connected Franklin to an additional five killings. The district attorney’s office decided not to charge Franklin with those crimes because he was already facing the death penalty and prosecutors did not want to further stall a trial that had already been beset by delays.

In all, investigators think Franklin may have killed as many as 25 women during the years he spent stalking one of the city’s most vulnerable populations.

In her closing argument to the jury, Deputy Dist. Atty. Beth Silverman gave a blistering recounting of each victim’s final moments, speaking with a palpable disdain for Franklin. The defendant, seated underneath a projector that displayed pictures of his victims’ battered and bloody bodies, never looked up.

“They were so vicious, they were so calculated, and they were so demeaning,” Silverman said of the killings. “The way that these women ended up, half of them naked … all of them in filthy alleys.”

Defense attorney Dale Atherton countered by appealing to the jury’s conscience in a plea for mercy. Executing Franklin, he said, would only “delay the healing process” for the victims’ families.

“Every time they think of the approaching execution date, it will be like opening the wounds again,” he said.

Photos: Grim Sleeper victims

 
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Posted by on June 6, 2016 in Domestic terrorism

 

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Justice Department to Seek Death Penalty for Dylan Roof

Bring back the Electric Chair! Toast him.

Justice Department To Seek Death Penalty For S.C. Church Shooting Suspect

The Justice Department says it will seek the death penalty against Dylann Roof, accused of fatally shooting nine people at a historically black church in Charleston, S.C., in June 2015.

“The nature of the alleged crime and the resulting harm compelled this decision,” Attorney General Loretta Lynch said in a statement.

The federal hate-crime charges against Roof “center on both the victims’ race and their identity as church-goers who were attempting to follow their religious beliefs when Roof attacked,” as The Two-Way reported last summer. At the time, Lynch called hate crimes “the original domestic terrorism.” Roof also faces federal weapons charges.

“The Justice Department says he selected the [Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church] and his victims to win notoriety and to try to ignite a race war,” NPR’s Carrie Johnson reports. “Roof has pleaded not guilty to the federal charges.”

Roof’s lawyer David Bruck declined to comment on Tuesday’s decision in an email to Carrie.

There is a separate case against Roof filed by authorities in South Carolina. Prosecutors in that case are also seeking the death penalty, as we reported in September.

Survivors of the attack and family members of the deceased victims “had differing views on whether Roof should face execution,” The Charleston Post and Courier says. An attorney for family members of three of the victims told the paper on Tuesday:

“The families will support this decision. Really, I think the families have mixed emotions about the death penalty. But if it’s ever going to be given, this case certainly calls for it.”

Roof is scheduled to be tried in January in the state case. It’s unclear at this point when the federal trial will take place.

 
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Posted by on May 24, 2016 in Domestic terrorism

 

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Grim Sleeper Serial Killer, Convicted

Black serial killers are rarer than white. About 90% of serial killers in the US are white males. It is unclear whether that is because black killers tend to kill fellow blacks, and thus go unnoticed by the police…Or if there are sociological reasons. In this case, the killer, Lonnie Franklin probably killed dozens more than he was convicted for.

Lonnie David Franklin Jr. Guilty For All 10 ‘Grim Sleeper’ Killings Of Women

Lonnie David Franklin Jr. killed nine women and a teen girl in a Los Angeles crime spree dating back 30 years.

A former sanitation worker accused of being the “GrimSleeper“ serial killer was found guilty of murder on Thursday for the slayings of nine women and a teenage girl in a Los Angeles crime spree dating back 30 years.

The Superior Court jury reached its verdict on all 10 counts of murder against the defendant, Lonnie David Franklin Jr., 63, after deliberating just over a day, capping a trial that stretched over more than 11 weeks.

Franklin, who could face the death penalty, also was convicted of attempted murder for an attack on an 11th victim who survived being shot, raped, pushed out of a car and left for dead in 1988.

Judge Kathleen Kennedy instructed jurors to return to the courtroom on May 12 for the start of the trial’s penalty phase.

Franklin, whose attorney sought to raise questions about DNA evidence presented during the trial, was convicted of fatally shooting or strangling seven victims between August 1985 and September 1988, and three others between March 2002 and January 2007.

The gap of more than 13 years between the two spates of murders earned the killer the “GrimSleeper“ moniker. Since his March 2011 indictment, police said they had gathered evidence linking Franklin to at least six more slayings, some of which took place during the previously presumed lapse in killings.

Franklin, who sat impassively in court as the verdicts were read on Thursday, has been in custody since his arrest in July 2010.

These are pictures of other possible victims of the “Grim Sleeper”

 
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Posted by on May 5, 2016 in American Genocide, Domestic terrorism

 

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Prosecutor to Seek Death Penalty for Charleston Murderer

And here I was thinking along the lines of 999 years in Gen Pop with the other prisoners…

Alleged SC Church Shooter Facing Possible Death Penalty

State prosecutors will be seeking the death penalty against the alleged South Carolina church shooter, they announced today.

In a court filing released today, state prosecutors indicated that they will be seeking the death penalty when Dylann Roof is tried in the killing of nine people at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston in June.

That more than two people were killed and others’ lives were put at risk were cited in the filing as the rationale for seeking capital punishment.

Solicitor Scarlett Wilson is scheduled to explain the state’s decision at a news conference this afternoon.

 

 
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Posted by on September 3, 2015 in Domestic terrorism

 

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Judge Mathis on Troy Davis Execution

Judge Mathis weighs in with a powerful condemnation of the Legal System and Georgia’s execution of Troy Davis.

 
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Posted by on September 24, 2011 in Domestic terrorism

 

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On Lynching and the Execution of Troy Davis

The execution of Troy Davis in Georgia has ignited a firestorm of outrage. Davis’ last words were that he was “innocent”.

Not surprising Cash and Carry Uncle Tommie Clarence led the Supreme Court’s decision not to intervene… Proving once again a black defendant can’t get a fair trial or consideration in the courts, whether it is due to racism, politics – or in the case of Thomas…

A need to re-establish his Lawn Ornament bonafides with the conservative people who own him. I am not arguing that Troy Davis’ execution would have been stopped by the court…

Only that were not the Supreme Court corrupt, at least he would have gotten a fair hearing.

The Execution of Troy Davis Provides Another ‘Haunting Reminder of Once Prevalent Southern Lynchings’

“I am innocent,” said Troy Davis, moments before the the state of Georgia put him to death.

The state-sanctioned slaying, which former President Jammy Carter characterized as “a grave miscarriage of justice,” was completed at 11:08 pm EST.

Before the execution, the man whose case inspired an international outcry against not just the death penalty but a dysfunctional “justice” system told the witnesses at the Georgia Diagnostic Prison facility: “The incident that night was not my fault. I did not have a gun.”

Addressing the family of, Mark MacPhail, the off-duty Savannah police officer he was accused of killing, Davis said he was sorry for their loss. Then, he said: “I did not personally kill your son, father and brother. I am innocent.”

To those who battled to save his life, Davis urged continued investigation, inquiry and struggle for justice. “All I can ask… is that you look deeper into this case so that you really can finally see the truth,” he said moments before the execution.

The killing of Davis took place after US Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, a Georgia native, led the High Court in rejecting a plea that the killing be blocked. There were no dissents from the other justices on the current Court.

But it is important to underline the word “current.”

Former Justice John Paul Stevens, who left the High Court last year, has argued in recent statements and interviews that the death penalty is “unconstitutional.”

In particular, he cited evidence confirming that African-Americans who are charged with murder (such as Troy Davis) are dramatically more likely than whites to be executed.

The General Accounting Office has concluded that “in 82 percent of the studies [reviewed], race of the victim was found to influence the likelihood of being charged with capital murder or receiving the death penalty, i.e. those who murdered whites were more likely to be sentenced to death than those who murdered blacks,” while former U.S. Senator Russ Feingold, the long-time chair of the Constutution Subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Commitee, has said that: “We simply cannot say we live in a country that offers equal justice to all Americans when racial disparities plague the system by which our society imposes the ultimate punishment.”

The American Civil Liberties Union notes that  “systemic racial bias in the application of the death penalty exists at both the state and federal level,” and it notes historic patterns of discrimination in particular states such as Georgia—highlighting the classic work of University of Iowa law professor David Baldus, who found that during the 1980s prosecutors in Georgia sought the death penalty for 70 percent of African-American defendants with white victims, but for only 15 percent of white defendants with black victims. (Troy Davis’ case traces back to an incident in 1989.)

The patterns of discrimination, noted Justice Stevens, “provides a haunting reminder of once prevalent Southern lynchings.“

 
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Posted by on September 22, 2011 in American Genocide, Domestic terrorism

 

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