Tag Archives: DC

DC Metro Subway Police – No Food on the Trains or We Will Bust You

No food on the trains was one of the original rules of the DC Metro System. Actually, I’m glad they are enforcing this again. The Washington Metro Train System used to be the cleanest subway system in the world. Unlike NYC or Chicago, the cars are not painted over with grafitti, and until the last two years or so, you could comfortably take a seat without messing up your suit because some ass left his happy meal on the seats.

Apparently the new management at Metro has decided to clean up the trains again, in light of their numerous other problems.

Young lady deserved to get arrested. Nobody want to ride the subway sitting in your shit.

Having worked underground in Metro’s tunnels installing equipment, I can tell you it is rather nice when you reach in an electronics cabinet not having a 3′ long rat hanging on your arm when you pull your arm out unlike in NYC.

Keep it clean!

The Black Lives that matter in this case are the other riders. About 60% of all subway rides on Metro are intra-city, serving the poorest sections of the city as well as some well to do areas. People in the Southeast section of the city, where some of the poorer areas are located, depend on that train to get to work every day, go to weddings, funerals, or to shop. There is no reason they should be forced to wade through some thoughtless cretins crap along the way.

DC transit cops hauled a teenager to juvie because she had snacks

They’re not charging her in the apparent case of “contempt of cop.”

Transit police in Washington, D.C., violently arrested a young black woman on Tuesday night because she was carrying snacks.

Videos posted Wednesday do not capture the beginning of the interaction between a trio of Metro Transit Police officers and the unnamed teenager.

But they show one of the cops kicking the woman’s feet out from under her and shoving her to the ground, while she is in handcuffs. And officers in the video confirm to angry bystanders that the arrest happened because the teenager wouldn’t relinquish a bag of chips and a lollipop when they confronted her in the Columbia Heights metro station.

After the takedown, the heavy-set officer who knocked the teenager down seems to realize the rough arrest has attracted a crowd. “Have a good day, folks,” he says. “If you wanna ride the system, put your card through and go attend the trains. If not, leave the station.”

In the first video, the teenager expresses distress at how tightly they cinched her handcuffs and shouts at a second officer who starts rifling through her backpack.

“You acting like it was a four-course meal,” she says. A moment later, one of the bystanders begins to address the officers directly, telling them their actions are ridiculous. The officer who earlier knocked the handcuffed girl to the ground and a second officer in a bike helmet argue with the woman criticizing them briefly.

“Little girls break the law, little girls get arrested like anybody else. And she goes to juvenile detention and her mom comes and picks her up, that’s how it works,” the bike cop says.


Posted by on October 21, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter, The Post-Racial Life


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Police Murder of Terrance Sterling in DC

This one in DC three weeks ago. The officer fired from inside a patrol car into moving traffic in a direct violation of DC Police rules, There was no threat to the officers, Sterling was unarmed.


Black Lives Matter DC raises questions about DC Police Union chairman

It has been three weeks since a D.C. police officer shot and killed Terrence Sterling. Despite the release of the police body camera footage and the officer’s name, there are still questions about what is going on behind the scenes of the investigation, especially since his death was ruled a homicide. Now, the Black Lives Matter movement is questioning the D.C. Police Union’s chairman and the impact his past will have on future proceedings.

Representatives for Black Lives Matter DC said a closed door meeting was held on Tuesday after the D.C. Police Union reached out to them. The meeting lasted about an hour and a half, but the group said they came out of the meeting with even more questions.

“I wanted him to know that this was bigger than just this case,” said April Goggans of Black Lives Matter DC. “That this case was indicative of all things that we’ve been saying – the way that it’s being handled.”

Black Lives Matter DC continues to question transparency in the Sterling case. Following the closed door meeting, the group’s words towards D.C. Police Union chairman Matthew Mahl are personal.

Black Lives Matter DC said in a news release that “Sergeant Mahl is no stranger to criminal behavior on the job,” citing a use of force incident back in 2015.

Documents, including the use of force report, obtained by FOX 5 confirmed, “Sergeant Mahl struck a handcuffed prisoner in the face after he was kicked in the groin by the prisoner.” Two separate review boards found Mahl’s use of force was unjustified and recommended a suspension that could have meant his termination from the force.

But sources confirmed to FOX 5 his suspension was quietly overturned by D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier just days after Mahl became police union chairman. Sources said it was an unprecedented move.

“To dismiss his case of police brutality the same week that he becomes president, I think that merged the solidarity between the [police] department and the [police] union,” said Goggans. “I think his idea of doing that is to build power.”

According to sources, disciplinary action against Mahl includes a police-involved shooting in 2007 and two unpaid suspensions in 2013 and 2015.


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Posted by on October 6, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter


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It Begins in Washington, DC. Black Man Shot Riding Motorcycle

“Coffin Ed here, Federal Po Po. That’s my partner Gravedigger over there.

“Jawanel, we got a witness to you and Tyrone holdin’ up that convenience store over on L St, and shooting Desquaninto. She’s right here, Betty Swan – who works over at Big Joes Grocery and lives off of 12th St NE.

So don’t you guys leave town now, while me and the Feds in-vestigate you…It shouldn’t take more than a year.”

Why we need answers now in the shooting death of Terrence Sterling


What next in the investigation of unarmed black motorcyclist Terrence Sterling, who was shot and killed on Sept. 11 by D.C. Police Officer Brian Trainer?

Speaking to reporters last week, Jason Downs, an attorney for Sterling’s family, said the 31-year-old was killed “unlawfully and unjustifiably.”

“It appears that Officer Trainer fired his weapon from the safety of his police vehicle when Mr. Sterling did not pose any threat to him whatsoever,” Downs said. The family, he said, wants more information about the circumstances surrounding the shooting, which took place near Third and M Streets NW.

Downs and Sterling’s family aren’t alone.

Hundreds of protesters have taken to city streets, holding vigils and blocking intersections to draw attention to the shooting and demand answers. Other District residents behind closed doors want answers, too.

The frustration is understandable. Three weeks have passed since news broke about the fatal shooting.

Here’s the problem: In all likelihood, weeks — if not months — will elapse before the Sterling family and the public learn anything new. The tragic event is in the hands of D.C. officials and the U.S. attorney’s office.

And federal prosecutors are reluctant to speak about the investigation in its early stage. There’s a history of tight-lipped probes, too.

There have been three police-involved fatalities in the District in the past 12 months. Each was treated by prosecutors the same way, with months elapsing before conclusions were announced.

For example, on Sept. 30, 2016, the U.S. attorney’s office announced that it had completed the review of a fatal shooting by an off-duty Baltimore County, Md., cop that occurred on Nov. 14, 2015, at Union Station. Prosecutors said they found insufficient evidence to pursue charges against the officer.

Next, there’s the investigation into a fatal shooting by a D.C. police officer at an intersection in Northeast D.C. on Nov. 19, 2015. It wasn’t completed until June 24, 2016, when prosecutors announced that they also found insufficient evidence to press charges in that case.

Results of the federal probe into the Sept. 29, 2015, fatal encounter between a hospital patient and two special police officers outside the hospital were announced seven months later, on May 17, 2016. The two officers were indicted by a grand jury on a charge of involuntary manslaughter.

In all police-involved fatalities, the U.S. attorney’s office investigates to see whether there is evidence to show that officers violated either federal or D.C. law. In two of the preceding cases, federal prosecutors, as explained in press releases, were unable to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the force used was excessive and “that the officer acted with the deliberate and specific intent to do something the law forbids.” “Prosecutors must,” as stated in the press releases, “be able to prove that the officers involved willfully used more force than was reasonably necessary. Proving ‘willfulness’ is a heavy burden.”

So in the Sterling case, expect the U.S. attorney’s office, assisted by the D.C. police department’s Internal Affairs Division, to conduct its probe in the same way it approached the three other cop-involved shootings — interviewing witnesses (both cops and civilians); combing through physical evidence, videotapes and recorded communications; and examining DNA and autopsy reports. All are time-consuming actions.

But months?

Folks are demanding answers now.

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Posted by on October 4, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter


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The New Chumph Disaster in DC

Trump is opening one of his dumps in DC. He somehow managed to win the bid to lease one of the most iconic and beautiful buildings in the city, the Old Post Office Building.

The problem here is there is no shortage of high-end Hotel space in the city. Places like the Hay Adams have been serving the city for over 100 years. The Willard, one of the historic hotels. Then there is The Jefferson. A small cut below, but wonderful are the Kimpton Donovan, Avery, Four Seasons, Mandarin, W, and St Regis… and two Ritz -Carletons…and the Rosewood

And then there are the Micro Hotels that folks seeking privacy and personal care love.

So the ugly elephant in the room (or lobby in this case) is WTF does anyone with that type of travel budget want to stay in a ticky-tacky wannabe?

I give it three years.Image result for old post office building DC

Donald Trump’s New D.C. Hotel Is Fancy, Expensive, and Probably Doomed

The GOP nominee is preparing to open Washington’s most expensive luxury hotel, but it might be doomed before the paint is even dry.

Donald Trump touts his supposed business acumen and his (self-proclaimed) reputation as a great “builder” as two of his greatest presidential qualifications. But in the heart of northwest Washington, D.C.—just a few blocks away from the White House he wishes to inhabit come January—it appears as though Trump has built himself one brand-new, luxuriously marbled flop.

On Monday afternoon, the real-estate mogul and Republican presidential nominee’s latest hotel finally enjoyed its soft opening (a quiet launch for invited guests that eschews all the pressures of an official grand opening) at the Old Post Office Pavilion.

The only celebrity spotted at the opening was, of all people, Oscar-nominated actor Randy Quaid (Independence Day, National Lampoon’s Vacationmovies, Brokeback Mountain), who has gone off the deep end and alleged that a Hollywood assassination squad was after him and his wife.

Asked why he was in D.C., Quaid simply pointed to Trump’s hotel and said “for this,” before jumping into a car and racing off.

The grand-opening ceremony for Trump International Hotel, Washington, D.C., will reportedly take place next month, weeks before election night.

In 2011, the Trump Organization beat out the competition to secure a 60-year lease from the federal government to renovate the iconic Old Post Office building. Trump broke ground on the project before officially jumping into the 2016 presidential fray last year, and he has repeatedly vowed to make his newest hotel property one of the very best in the world. Earlier this year, he used his presidential campaign to help promote and brag about the new Trump hotel.

Between now and the planned October grand opening, Trump’s D.C. venture has a way to go…

Every item of decor, from the turquoise and faux-gold armchairs to the candy dishes made out of fake dimes and nickels, was handpicked by Ivanka Trump with the help of design firm HBA. The overall aesthetic is somewhere between real, inoffensive luxury and a Red Roof Inn patron’s conception of what a stylish, upper-echelon hotel must be…

The hotel opens now with only one two-floor restaurant located in the lobby—BLT Prime, a chain steakhouse.

The bad news for Trump Hotels doesn’t stop there. Some industry estimates have reservations at Trump hotels down almost 60 percent since September of last year—and the word on the street is that Trump’s legal tiff with the two celebrity chefs has tanked his family and brand name in the eyes of the restaurant community.

“He’s clearly a racist and makes racist comments, and we have an industry that has always reached out to an immigrant population and built on the work of an immigrant population,” Top Chef’s Tom Colicchio, the owner of Craft who was reportedly approached by the Trump Organization after Andrés and Zakarian bailed, told Mother Jones magazine. (Colicchio is also a friend of Andrés.)

“I think that the remarks [Trump] makes would make it very difficult for anyone to stand up in front of their staff and want to be part of what he’s doing,” he continued.

But if none of this bothers you, and you’ve found yourself in Washington, D.C., and need a place to crash, just make sure the Trump International Hotel is in your price range.

For weeknights this fall, the hotel’s least expensive rooms will run you a minimum of $735 per night. For comparison, other luxury hotels that will compete with Trump for business ring in at $400 a night at The Jefferson for October (around the time of the opening of the Trump hotel), and roughly $300 at The Willard. Both are boutique and historic hotels in the District.

The room rates at Trump’s new establishment aren’t by simple design, but by necessity.

In a filing with the General Services Administration, lawyers for one of Trump’s competitors argued that for Trump’s hotel to stay afloat, it would have to charge some of the most exorbitant rates in the nation’s capital.

“A properly conducted price reasonableness analysis would have resulted in the conclusion that the minimum base lease proposed by Trump would require Trump to obtain hotel room revenues which are simply not obtainable in this location based on the concepts for the redevelopment,” the lawyers for the competing development team wrote.

Welcome to Trump’s D.C. hotel—perhaps a microcosm of the bigger, badder,and broke America that a President Trump could have in store.

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Posted by on September 13, 2016 in The Clown Bus


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Smithsonian African-American Museum Opens

The National Museum of African American Culture and History has opened. Love the idea, but really am no fan of the building architecture, which is both decidedly visually unexciting, and unlike the Native American Museum seems to have no visual cultural clues as to it’s function.

National Museum of African American History and Culture; (NMAAHC) construction site - Conststution Avenue and 14 th Street image taken on Conststution site October 23, 2015.


Smithsonian’s National African-American Museum opens at last

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture was over a century in the making. In 1915, black Civil War veterans collected funds they later put toward creating a museum on the National Mall that would celebrate African-American achievement. In 1929, President Calvin Coolidge signed Public Resolution 107, establishing a commission to plan its construction, but the project went nowhere. It took a renewed effort by lawmakers and African-American leaders beginning in the 1960s, and then decades of planning and proposals, before President George W. Bush signed legislation in 2003 authorizing the museum, which is set to open September 24, steps from the Washington Monument.

“It’s one of those sites and projects that comes about only once in a generation,” says the lead designer of the building, David Adjaye. “It’s always magical to complete a project, but to complete this one on the National Mall, it’s very profound. It’s very humbling.”

Construction on the exterior of the building, a glass structure wrapped in a three-tiered bronze-colored scrim that’s meant to recall a motif in African sculpture (it looks like boxes stacked on a figure’s head), was completed in 2015. Curators are now filling the galleries with artifacts from a collection of some 34,000 items spanning centuries or longer. Museum Director Lonnie Bunch says the exhaustive preparation and organizing is “really almost like planning a military exercise.”

Larger artifacts already in place include a 1944 training plane used by the black military pilots known as the Tuskegee Airmen; a once-segregated railway car and a guard tower from the Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola, both of which the museum lowered in place with cranes before constructing the roof; a 19th-century slave cabin from South Carolina; and Chuck Berry’s red Cadillac.

“When I walk through, I feel the weight of my ancestors,” Bunch says. “I feel an amazing sense of joy that we are close to giving to America, giving to the world, a gift. A gift of understanding who we are as a people in ways that we haven’t before.”

The museum’s nine floors contain three history galleries covering slavery through present day, including the #BlackLivesMatter movement; a theater named for donor Oprah Winfrey; culture galleries featuring African-American icons of music, theater, film and television; and a Contemplative Court, where visitors can reflect on what they’ve seen.

Adjaye has said “there’s triumph and there’s also incredible tragedy” in the history of the African-American experience. Bunch agrees: “You cannot tell stories of celebration and resistance without understanding the trials and travails.”

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Posted by on June 2, 2016 in Black History


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The Obama’s New Digs

After the Presidency, the Obama’s will be moving to some really nice digs in DC’s Kalorama Section. Kalorama is one of several sections in the city which feature beautiful high-end, often stone faced homes in a wooded setting, bordered on two sides by Rock Creek Park and the Naval Observatory. The Obama’s will be renting, while they decide where they would like to ultimately locate. No hint on whether they will return to Chicago. At 8200 sf, I don’t think they will be cramped for space.

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Posted by on May 27, 2016 in Giant Negros


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Anatomy of a Disaster

This is the BIG problem plaguing our subway system in DC. This one does not appear to be a failing power connector. If you look closely towards the bottom left there appears to be a bit of trash, possibly tin foil caught on the insulator holding the 3rd Rail, allowing it to arc to ground and the travelling rail. 700 Volts at 6,000 Amps makes a hell of a boom when it is shorted!

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Posted by on May 6, 2016 in News, Uncategorized


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