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The Great White Ghetto – Disability as Welfare

In the Great White Ghetto stretching along the Appalachians and extending west to Missouri, nearly 25% of the population is on a different kind of welfare.

Increasingly, these folks are supported not only by SNAP, or Food Stamps, but also suck the Federal teat in the form of fraudulent “Disability” payments. Entire families, including Mom, Dad, and children cheat the system by declaring themselves “unable to work”, or mentally and physically unable to function – often with the help of bribing medical doctors for diagnosis.This scam runs generations deep, with often the grandchildren of people on the program being declared “disabled”.

Near 50% of the people in this region are on Medicare, Medicaid, or Obamacare.

These folks are your Trump voters. And should Trumpcare, and the Trump budget pass – they are going to do something that hasn’t happened in 3 or 4 generations in their families…

Get jobs.

These folks make up the largest portion of people on disability, and make up 9% of the US Population

This year, the United States will spend more money on disability benefits than food stamps,

welfare, housing subsidies and unemployment. (Danielle Kunitz and Whitney Leaming)

Generations, disabled

A family on the fringes prays for the “right diagnoses”

PEMISCOT COUNTY, Mo. — The food was nearly gone and the bills were going unpaid, but they still had their pills, and that was what they thought of as the sky brightened and they awoke, one by one. First came Kathy Strait, 55, who withdrew six pills from a miniature backpack and swallowed them. Then emerged her daughter, Franny Tidwell, 32, who rummaged through 29 bottles of medication atop the refrigerator and brought down her own: oxcarbazepine for bipolar disorder, fluoxetine for depression, an opiate for pain. She next reached for two green bottles of Tenex, a medication for hyperactivity, filled two glasses with water and said, “Come here, boys.”

Disabled America: Between 1996 and 2015, the number of working-age adults receiving federal disability payments increased dramatically across the country — but nowhere more so than in rural America. In this series, The Washington Post explores how disability is shaping the culture, economy and politics of these small communities.

Part 1: Disabled, or just desperate? Rural Americans turn to disability as jobs dry up

The boys were identical twins William and Dale, 10. They were the fourth generation in this family to receive federal disability checks, and the first to be declared no longer disabled and have them taken away. In days that had grown increasingly tense, as debts mounted and desperation grew to prove that the twins should be on disability, this was always the worst time, before the medication kicked in, when the mobile home was filled with the sounds of children fighting, dogs barking, adults yelling, television volume turned up.

And so went another morning, loud and chaotic, right up until the moment someone dropped the puppy.

As it fell the four feet to the ground, the trailer suddenly quieted. The four children stopped fighting. The two adults stopped yelling. Then the weeks-old puppy hit the scuffed linoleum floor, whimpered softly, and events, no longer suspended, began to unfold again.

“It’s dying,” Dale said, looking at the cocoa-colored dog, which had gone limp. “It’s dying. It’s dying.”

“It might have snapped its neck,” Kathy said.

William looked at the puppy, then at the medications collected above the refrigerator, then at his mother, Franny, who wasn’t saying anything.

“Mommy, give him some medicine to keep him alive,” William said.

“He’s dead,” Dale said.

“Give him some pain medicine!” William said.

“Your puppy just died,” Dale said.

“Give him some pain medicine!” William said again.

Talk of medications, of diagnoses, of monthly checks that never seem to cover every need — these are the constants in households like this one, composed of multiple generations of people living on disability. Little-studied and largely unreported, such families have become familiar in rural communities reshaped by a decades-long surge that swelled the nation’s disability rolls by millions before declining slightly in 2015 as older beneficiaries aged into retirement benefits, according to interviews with social workers, lawyers, school officials, academics and rural residents.

How to visualize the growth in disability in the United States? One way is to think of a map. Rural communities, where on average 9.1 percent of working-age people are on disability — nearly twice the urban rate and 40 percent higher than the national average — are in a brighter shade than cities. An even brighter hue then spreads from Appalachia into the Deep South and out into Missouri, where rates are higher yet, places economists have called “disability belts.” The brightest color of all can be found in 102 counties, mostly within these belts, where a Washington Post analysis of federal statistics estimates that, at minimum, about 1 in 6 working-age residents draw disability checks.

As the number of working-age Americans receiving disability rose from 7.7 million in 1996 to 13 million in 2015, so did the number of households with multiple family members on disability, climbing from an estimated 525,000 in 2000 to an estimated 850,000 in 2015, according to a Post analysis of census data. The analysis is probably an undercount.

A separate Post examination of census data found that households reporting at least one disabled adult are three times as likely to report having a disabled child, too, although most households affected by disability report only one disabled member. Multigenerational disability, The Post found, is far more common in poor families.

“I’ve been aware of it my whole professional life,” said Michael L. Price, a demographer who retired from the University of Louisville in 2013. “In eastern Kentucky and other rural areas, you’re more likely to have intergenerational households, not just two but three generations. You have grandparents, very young grandparents, living together with grandchildren or in close proximity. And families don’t separate, so it sets it up not only for the next generation, but for two generations, that ‘This is what’s there, this is what you’re dependent on.’ ”

Other experts, however, say the phenomenon has little to do with generational dependence. “I hesitate to use a term like ‘culture.’ It’s not a specific, measurable metric,” said Kathleen Romig, an analyst with the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, who studies disability in the United States. “Certain things like toxic stress or nutrition or preterm births or parental depression or genetics” offer a more revealing context for understanding generational disability.

And yet others say it’s about money.

Ruth Horn, director of social services in Buchanan County, Va., which has one of the country’s highest rates of disability, has spent decades working with profoundly poor families. Some parents, she said, don’t encourage their children academically, and even actively discourage them from doing well, because they view disability as a “source of income,” and think failure will help the family receive a check.

“It’s not a hard thing to limit a person,” Horn said, adding: “It’s generations deep.”

For this family in Pemiscot County, crowding around their dazed puppy, the momentum was beginning to waver. The boys, who started receiving benefits after their premature birth, had recently lost them as the government stepped up its periodic reviews, which rose from 925,000 in 2010 to 2.1 million in 2016. Now their grandmother and mother, certain the twins were autistic, were trying to convince the government that it had made a mistake.

They knew it wouldn’t be easy but hoped that a psychological assessment of the children, due any day now, would provide just the proof they needed. In their minds it had come down to this: Prove the boys were autistic, get the checks back and climb from crushing poverty into manageable poverty.

Kathy set the puppy down on the kitchen table, and it took a wobbly step, then another.

“I’m going to name you Miracle,” she said softly. “Because it’s a miracle you’re alive.”…

 

 

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Big Bird 2, Chumph 0

Republicans are at it again trying to kill Big Bird. Seems they shoulda learned from the last go-round.

The Chumph wants to kill Sesame Street so he can but some tanks to parade down Constitution Avenue on May Day.

That isn’t going to happen.

The Chumph’s budget is headed down the same dead end road as his Obamacare repeal…DOA.

Image result for trump battered and bandaged

Americans want to keep “Sesame Street,” not Trump’s budget cuts: poll

It appears that the American Health Care Act isn’t the only part of President Donald Trump’s agenda that is getting skewered in the polls.

In a press release on Friday, Quinnipiac University announced the results of their latest poll on Trump’s budget. It finds that more than four-out-of-five Americans oppose cutting funds to medical research (87 percent to 9 percent), new road and transit projects (84 percent to 13 percent), and after school and summer school programs (83 percent to 14 percent).

By somewhat smaller margins, voters are also opposed to eliminating the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (79 percent to 17 percent), the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (70 percent to 25 percent), and the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities (66 percent to 27 percent).

Like the separate Quinnipiac University Poll released on Thursday, this new survey indicates a significant lack of public support for President Trump’s legislative agenda outside of his own Republican base. The poll from Thursday found that 74 percent of Americans oppose cutting funds to Medicaid (only 22 percent support it) and 56 percent oppose the Obamacare repeal bill (only 17 percent support it). By contrast, only 41 percent of Republicans supported the Obamacare repeal bill (24 percent opposed it), although even a majority of Republicans did not want to cut Medicaid funds (54 percent opposed compared to 39 percent supporting).

Friday’s poll also contained mixed news for Trump regarding support for his programs within the Republican Party. While an overwhelming majority support his Mexican wall proposal (74 percent to 24 percent), 50 percent of Republicans — and 74 percent of total voters — don’t want Trump to lower taxes on the wealthy (43 percent and 22 percent support him doing so, respectively).

Image result for trump battered and bandaged

 

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Junkies for Trump – Trumpazoid Celebrates Overdose Deaths of Ohio Farmer’s Kids

There is an epidemic out there in Trump Country. And it is killing more white, rural and suburban kids than all the black-on-black crime than any of the cities…Over three times as many and growing every year.

The Chumph’s budget cuts, and Paul Ryan’s Chumpcare assure that more of these kids will be dying, because of cuts (or outright dropping) in addiction treatment, availability of overdose drugs, and availability of counseling.

These kid’s parents voted for Trump…And in doing so killed their own children.

Voting race over the lives of their own children.

Image result for overdose

Trumpcare cuts include treatment for addiction…

Ohio farmer loses two kids to heroin overdose — and Obamacare-hating Trump fan celebrates

An Ohio father who lost two of his three children to heroin overdoses said he received a letter celebrating their deaths that was postmarked from a condominium complex owned by President Donald Trump.

Roger Winemiller shared his family’s story earlier this month with the New York Timesand WCPO-TV, and he got an anonymous letter about a week later that called for the repeal of Obamacare and referred to Trump, the TV station reported.

“It’s wonderful that junkies overdose and die,” the letter reads. “That is the only way we can rid America of all those low-life scum. I am so happy that your children did their part in reducing the drug population.”

The writer suggested that the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would break the grip of heroin addiction in many parts of the U.S.

“We should look forward to the repeal of filthy Obamacare,” the letter reads. “When we reduce mooching, those thieves will quickly die when they lose medical access.”

The Wayne Township father lost his 31-year-old daughter to overdose March 26, 2016, and her older brother died from overdose nine months later. His surviving son, Roger T. Winemiller, has also struggled with drug addiction but is currently in recovery.

“It’s a perfect example of what we face here in this nation,” Winemiller said. “The type of people who are too heartless and self-centered to realize that addicts are beautiful people, and they are someone’s son or daughter. If they had a chance to talk to a recovering addict and see how vibrant they are, how intelligent, they might think differently.”

The letter was marked with a Trump Palace return address, but an employee told WCPO that the Trump Group-owned residential property had never had a resident whose name matched the sender’s signature.

Warren County, where Winemiller lives, backed Trump over Hillary Clinton in November’s election by a 67-29 spread — a much higher margin that Ohio’s overall 52-44 tilt toward the Republican candidate.

The southwestern Ohio county, like many others that backed Trump, is struggling with an epidemic of heroin addiction.

A recent task force report found Warren County, an exurban community between Cincinnati and Dayton, had seen a double- or triple-digit increase in opioid heroin overdoses and deaths.

Drug overdose was listed as the cause of death in 20 fatalities in 2014, up from 11 in Warren County a decade before, and shot up to 60 in 2015, according to medical authorities.

About 70 percent of those addiction cases start with prescription drug use in the home, but some addicts move on to heroin — which is both cheaper and more powerful.

A post-election analysis by historian Kathleen Frydl found a strong correlation between the opioid epidemic and counties in Ohio and Pennsylvania that swung from President Barack Obama in 2012 to Trump in 2016.

Twenty-six Ohio counties reported 20 or more drug overdose deaths per 100,000 people in 2015, and there was a 10 percent surge in all but two of those counties in support for Trump compared with Republican Mitt Romney in 2012.

There was a corresponding 10-percent or more drop in Clinton support compared with Obama in the previous election — and the shift was big enough for five of those counties to flip from Democrat in 2012 to GOP in 2016.

All but four of 33 high-overdose counties in Pennsylvania followed the same trend.

Another study by Penn State sociologist Shannon Monnat found Trump’s overperformance in Rust Belt counties correlated with other public health crises — including drug and alcohol addiction and suicide.

 

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Trayvom Martin Case – When “evidence” isn’t Evidence

ABC News released a report to reputedly documenting George Zimmerman’s injuries. The problem with this as that the report was generated by a family physician the day AFTER the shooting.  This means that the evidence was not checked or safeguarded by the Police, who could assure that the “injuries” suffered by Zimmerman were really as a result of the altercation – and not something generated to provide an alibi for his actions. There is no chain of evidence.

Truth here was the second victim, thrown under the bus by the local police not doing their jobs.

George Zimmerman

ABC News Exclusive: Zimmerman Medical Report Shows Broken Nose, Lacerations After Trayvon Martin Shooting

A medical report compiled by the family physician of Trayvon Martin shooter George Zimmerman and obtained exclusively by ABC News found that Zimmerman was diagnosed with a “closed fracture” of his nose, a pair of black eyes, two lacerations to the back of his head and a minor back injury the day after he fatally shot Martin during an alleged altercation.

Zimmerman faces a second degree murder charge for the Feb. 26 shooting that left the unarmed 17-year-old high school junior dead. Zimmerman has claimed self defense in what he described as a life and death struggle that Martin initiated by accosting him, punching him in the face, then repeatedly bashing his head into the pavement.

Also today, a trove of documents are being examined by lawyers for both the defense and prosecution as part of discovery in Zimmerman’s trial — including 67 CDs worth of documents, video of Martin on the night of the shooting, his autopsy report and videos of Zimmerman’s questioning by police.

Zimmerman’s three-page medical report is included in those documents that the defense could use as evidence.

 
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Posted by on May 17, 2012 in Domestic terrorism

 

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Gov David Paterson – And the New York Budget Axe

Most dangerous politician in the world is one with nothing to lose. Faced with a totally currupt and dysfunctional legislature, some rather questionable judges, and a complete refusal by the State’s Labor Unions to negotiate any solution which might ward off disaster…

Governor David Paterson dropped the axe. And it’s just the beginning of what needs to be done to get the state back on it’s financial feet. Since Paterson doesn’t have any expectation of an elected political future – he may be just the guy to clean up the mess in NY.

The Axeman Cometh

Gov. David Paterson orders layoffs of 8,900 New York state employees amid economic downturn

Gov. Paterson ordered 8,900 state jobs slashed Tuesday to help close a budget deficit that has ballooned by another $2.2 billion.While some jobs will be lost through attrition, the bulk will be through layoffs that would begin in July, Paterson budget spokesman Jeffrey Gordon said.

Paterson aides say the cuts – the first large-scale layoffs since Gov. George Pataki laid off 2,500 workers in 1995-96 – would save the state $481 million.

Gordon said the governor was forced to make the move after the state’s major unions refused to agree to concessions – or come up with a savings plan.

“The governor believes this is a truly unfortunate situation,” Gordon said. “It is not where he wanted to end up. He worked very hard to avoid this outcome.”

Gordon said the administration has been talking with the unions about concessions since October.

“We tried numerous times to modify proposals to minimize the potential impact on state employees,” he said. “All offers were rejected.” Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 6, 2010 in News, The Post-Racial Life

 

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