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Why BLM Succeeds – Follow the Lawsuit Cost to Cities

The reason Police Accountability is beginning to get real in some municipalities is the cost. Police beatings, shooting, mistreatment of citizens is costing big bucks as a result of lawsuits. Chicago’s tab was over $100 million last year. That’s $100 million taxpayer dollars which didn’t go to improving schools, fixing roads, or improving Government services.

With so many of these cases appearing on video, providing irrefutable evidence of misbehavior by that minority of bad Cops – its no longer possible to deflect the issue by blaming the Lawyers…Or the victims.

Now unless you are a dumb as shit, racist Trumpazoid – you should be able to realize three things –

  1. Either your taxes are going up, or you will get less for the tax money you do pay. If you want to reduce taxes, the best way is to cut unnecessary spending. A lot of Cops do their jobs – and do them well, without beating up handcuffed suspects, shooting the unarmed, and harassing the citizenry.
  2. It’s not only Black Folks and Minorities. White folks get killed too, even though Minorities stand a chance of being on the receiving end of bad policing at several times that of white citizens. The beat-down you save may be your own.
  3. It is making it a hell of a lot harder for good cops to do their jobs. After hitting historical lows in the numbers of Cops killed or injured on the job, being unaccountable may well reverse that trend as citizens see no alternative to violence.

And for the “All Lives Matter/Blue Lives Matter” Bozos…It’s the MONEY, STUPID!

 

 

 
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Posted by on April 17, 2017 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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What Segregation Costs Chicago

The most segregated places in America are oddly northern midwest cities. In that list are Milwaukee, Chicago, Detroit, and Cleveland.

According to a Study by Johns Hopkins a a few years ago, racism in America quite literally lops off about $2 trillion of our GDP. Just the loss of GDP due to racism in America is larger than the GDP of all but 10 countries in the world.

Racism has other impacts on the social fabric and economic activity in this country, some of which are discussed below in the attached article.

China is now the world’s largest economy. The US is number 2. And it will remain so indefinitely until we make better use of our resources. The racist Trump, and his supporters in the white right, including the Republican Party value their racism more than their country… Which means we could soon be #3. Wow! That’s a “great” way to “Make America Great Again.”

What segregation is costing Chicago

The Chicago area is the fifth most racially and economically segregated region in the nation. A new study by the Metropolitan Planning Council and the Urban Institute examines how segregation affects the region financially and the price that all residents pay in “lost income, lives and education.”

The Cost of Segregation argues that reducing Chicago’s segregation could result in higher incomes, greater educational achievement and fewer homicides across the region. Incomes for African-Americans would rise an average of $2,982 per person per year and the Chicago region’s gross domestic product, a key indicator of economic performance, would jump by $8 billion.

Alden Loury, director of research and evaluation for the Metropolitan Planning Council and an author of the study, talked to the Reporter about its findings.

What makes this study unique is that it explores how segregation affects economic growth and the quality of life for an entire city and region. We’ve read stories about Back of the Yards, Austin and other communities of color defined by high poverty rates. What prompted researchers to frame the inequality in those communities from a regional and citywide standpoint?

The Metropolitan Planning Council a couple of years ago, long before I got there, embarked on this journey with essentially two questions. [First], we’re very aware that we are a very segregated region. We’re a segregated city within that region. … There also was an understanding that in order for us to really address segregation and really commit ourselves to addressing segregation maybe the region needed more people to feel impacted.

“So is there a way we can kind of quantify those costs?” That was the first question. The second question was, “So what do we do about whatever we find?”… That kind of launched us on this path. We reached out to the Urban Institute, which had done similar work.

The premise of the study is that the region would do better if we addressed segregation in three areas: lost income, lost lives and lost opportunity, with a focus on education. Let’s start with the city’s homicide rate, which ranks 8th out of the 10 U.S. cities with the highest murder rates. The study states that the Chicago area could have boosted its economy simply by being “a safe place to live.” How is that?

When [the Urban Institute] conducted its analysis, it found a statistically significant relationship between Chicago, and between all of the metro areas, their level of black-white segregation and their rate of homicides.

If the Chicago region were to fall from 10th, which is where it ranked [in black-white segregation] to the median between 50 and 51, the Urban Institute determined that we would see a 30-percent reduction in homicide. That’s based on the lower levels of homicides that are generally found in regions that have less segregation than Chicago.

We wanted to find out what does that actually mean in real-life costs in the Chicago region. So we leaned on supplemental research, in particular research done by the Center for American Progress just a couple of years ago, where they actually asked that question: “What would happen if eight major metros saw a 10 percent or a 25 -percent reduction in the levels of homicide?”

For Chicago what the Center for American Progress found was lower policing costs, lower corrections costs and earnings [that would have occurred] if there were fewer victims of homicide. And there would also be a boost in residential property values based on research that the Center for American Progress conducted, which found that growth in homicides equated to a decline in residential property values. We took those numbers that the Center for American Progress developed and extrapolated them based on the Urban Institute’s prediction that the Chicago region would see a 30-percent reduction in homicides. … What that equated to was $65 million of policing and fewer policing cost, $218 million fewer corrections cost and the $6 billion bump in the residential property values for the entire region.

Between 1990 and 2010, two-thirds of the nation’s largest regions reduced their economic segregation more than Chicago did. Chicago declined by 10 percent, but to keep up it would have to decline by 19 percent  in terms of economic segregation, 28 percent in terms of Latino-white segregation and 36 percent in terms of African-American and white segregation.  Why did other cities make more progress than Chicago in reducing segregation?

The analysis gives us more of the what than it does the why. And so in the second phase of our work, we are seeking input from a whole host of experts and stakeholders around what policies and strategies we should recommend to address the segregation. We also want to take a look at some places that have seen a sharper drop in economic segregation, that have seen stronger progress in terms of mostly black-white segregation. And then also looking inward because Chicago has seen declines across the board and is in fact the only metro area of those 100 metro areas that saw from 1990 to 2000 and from 2000 to 2010 minor drops in all three of those measures of segregation.

There’s a difference in the segregation gap between African-Americans and whites and Latinos and whites. Why does it vary so much in Chicago?

The level of black-white segregation is measured by something the Urban Institute used called the spatial proximity index. In Chicago in 2010 that number was 1.87. That number was 1.5 for the Chicago region in terms of Latinos and whites. And so there are differences. And across the nation, generally speaking, the levels of black-white segregation were higher than the measures for Latino-white segregation.

It’s not 100 percent clear at least from the research why that is. [Surveys in Chicago] have shown among the white respondents that there is a greater willingness to live next to Latino neighbors than to African-American neighbors. Some of the other things that may play a part in that is that as Latino migration has  increased dramatically over the past 40 years or so, there are greater entry points and perhaps more opportunities that have been explored by Latinos.

In Chicago the way that’s played out is Latinos initially were migrating to the city. But increasingly over the last 20, maybe 30 years or so, that destination has trended toward the suburbs. As a result, that has produced a kind of a lessening of segregation because Latinos are found throughout the suburban regions of Chicago far more often than you’ll find African-Americans. African-Americans are largely in two clusters to the south and to the west in suburban Chicago. Latinos are far more spread out, and their numbers are higher in the suburbs and in more places.

To some degree, at least through the surveys that we’ve seen, there is perhaps less of a reaction to Latino neighbors. But that’s not to say that there isn’t white flight in response to Latino migration or other challenges. … While we don’t present any statistically significant findings of the cost of Latino-white segregation [in the study], we see greater amounts of gentrification in Latino neighborhoods that are seeing an influx of white residents. And while Latinos are more suburbanized, they, generally speaking, are more likely to be segregated in more deindustrialized and declining communities in the suburbs. And Latino children are more likely to be in largely Latino schools serving low-income students.

 

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Another $4.9 Million Tax Bill For Chicago’s Bad Cops

Been saying this for a while …At some point the expense of bad policing become unsustainable by the tax base. $250 million buys a lot of road repairs and upgrades to schools. $250 million is the payout Chicago is now on the hook for in lawsuits due to police brutality and misbehavior. And it is rising every day.

Chicago To Pay $4.9 Million To Family Of Man Dragged In Handcuffs

Philip Coleman died at a hospital in 2012, according to court records.

The city of Chicago has agreed to pay the family of a black man who died after being dragged by handcuffs from a cell in a police lockup and down a hallway more than three years ago, an attorney for the family said on Monday.

Philip Coleman, 38, was arrested for domestic battery against his mother on Dec. 12, 2012.

After he refused to go to court the next morning, several police officers struggled with Coleman inside a cell, and he was Tasered, court records showed. In an incident caught on video, an officer dragged a motionless Coleman by his handcuffs.

Coleman later died at a hospital, according to court records. The Chicago Tribune reported that an autopsy showed he died of a reaction to an antipsychotic drug and also had bruises and abrasions on his body. Reuters was not able to confirm the cause of death.

Ed Fox, a lawyer for the family, told Reuters by phone that Coleman’s family and the city of Chicago had reached a settlement over the family’s civil rights lawsuit, but declined to confirm media reports that it was for $4.9 million.

The city’s law department declined to comment.

 
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Posted by on April 6, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Taxing Guns and Ammo…A “Gun Control” Strategy That Won’t Work

Making it more expensive to own or shoot a gun isn’t going to have any impact at all on folks who use guns to murder other folks. Cute idea by the Seattle City Council…

But utterly ineffectual from a prevention standpoint.

Right now, there is an ammunition “shortage”, with some of the most popular calibers such as the 22 round used by almost everyone for target shooting of paper targets or metal plates either being unavailable, or off the shelves entirely. As is usual in America in artificially induced “shortage” situations prices of a box of ammo have doubled and tripled. So hunters and target shooters are already paying 3 times what they were just a few years ago for ammo…And they are still clearing the shelves. One of my favorite “Varmint Elimination” rounds for down at the farm in the country has gone from an average of $8.00 a box of 50, to $18-20. Even the trusty 22 cal, I use for the occasional over aggressive Rat Tail Black Snake trying to set up residence in the house or barn has shot through the roof.

So how is paying $1.00 a round for 9mm ammunition going to prevent gangbangers and homegrown terrorists from buying bullets? The only thing this is setting up is a black market in selling “broken” boxes where some enterprising black market entrepreneur will start selling bullets by the half dozen for a 25% profit over the case price. Further, the profits from illegal drugs are so high…A small rise in prices can be absorbed by “the cost of doing business”.

I mean, admittedly there aren’t many legitimate uses for a gun in a major city – but people who want to buy (and use) guns and ammo will just drive outside the city limits to buy. My own state, Virginia gained a reputation a few years ago for being the principal supplier to guns for crime sin New York City. Admittedly the lax gun law of the time, which allowed anyone to buy 50 or 100 guns at a time didn’t help.

The only way to solve the “gun problem” in America – is some sensible restrictions aimed directly at the “loose” interpretation of the Second Amendment, and the NRA.

Want Fewer Murders? Tax Guns and Ammo

With a new national push to combat gun violence, the city of Seattle has begun to tax firearms and ammunition in an audaciously creative way to get around Second Amendment protections on guns. The tax has passed its first court test, signaling an approach that other municipalities could adopt, with a $25 tax on every firearm sold in the city, two cents on every round of .22 caliber ammunition, and a 5-cent tax for every other round of ammunition.

The tax went into effect on January 1st after surviving a challenge from the NRA and other gun rights groups when King County Superior Court Judge Palmer Rubinson ruled in December that the city of Seattle has the “constitutional and legislative authority to impose taxes” – which, as she noted, is separate from the city’s ability to regulate guns.

City attorney Pete Holmes was initially surprised the NRA didn’t ask for a stay in the Judge’s ruling when filing its appeal Monday in state court.  If the NRA sought constitutional relief, they would have appealed in federal court. But, from a legal standpoint, this isn’t about the constitution. “Everybody assumes this is about the Second Amendment, but it’s not, and that’s the story,” Holmes told the Daily Beast in a telephone interview.

“No one is telling you that you can’t own or buy a gun,” says Holmes.  “We believe we are in a safe haven. We’re not regulating guns; we’re simply adding a tax.”

In Seattle, satisfying the Second Amendment is easier for gun safety advocates than clearing “State Preemption,” a legislative barrier that the National Rifle Association employs to block gun safety regulation in some three-dozen states, including Washington.  It’s a short statute the gun rights lobby writes and then muscles through state legislatures, says no other body, such as the municipal authorities in cities like Seattle, can regulate firearms. The NRA’s Institute of Legal Action (ILA) churns out the statutes and lawmakers in state after state are happy to oblige.

And with so many state legislatures wholly owned subsidiaries of the NRA, it’s an effective maneuver. Holmes says it was the undoing of an executive order issued two Seattle mayors ago banning firearms in city playgrounds and parks. The Court overturned the ban not under the Second Amendment but under State Preemption.

So it is a big deal in Seattle that this modest tax is in place, and that the money it generates will go toward compiling data about gun violence and putting targeted intervention programs in place.  After the 2012 Sandy Hook massacre of first-graders, Seattle funded a study that found people with gun shot wounds treated at Harbor View Hospital, the regional trauma center, are 30 percent more likely to return with another gunshot, or as a homicide victim.

The study was the first of its kind done by a city, and researchers found parallels with alcohol-related injuries in the early 1990’s. Spending 20-30 minutes with patients injured in such incidents before releasing them to talk about risk and their chances of being readmitted paid off in lower re-admittance rates….Read the rest here

 

 
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Posted by on January 7, 2016 in Domestic terrorism, Stupid Democrat Tricks

 

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Another Conservative Failure – Getting Tough on Crime and the Prison Industrial Complex

Thanks to conservative failure to understand the cost of the highest level of incarceration in the world, hundreds of former prisons now sit empty because they are too expensive to operate costing taxpayers billions.

Since Raygun Republicans have embraced the idea of building prisons and ever more draconian penalties. The problem is – conservatives are real big on action…

But not real big on thinking. It never occurred to them that prisons cost money. Like tax cuts, being tough on crime has been a conservative staple – betting that the average Faux News addicted not too bright Republican voter is way too stupid to figure out that just like in your household income … The government has expenses.

One of the results of the 2010 election is that giant, rotten Dodo bird has come home to roost, with Republicans now in charge of the majority of State Houses in the middle of many states going broke.

They now have to fix the mess they created.

Republican lawmakers paying for tough crime laws

When Harry Coates campaigned for the Oklahoma state Senate in 2002, he had one approach to crime: “Lock ’em up and throw away the key.”

Now, Coates is looking for that key. He and other tough-on-crime lawmakers across the country, faced with steep budget shortfalls, are searching anxiously for ways to let inmates out of prison faster and keep more offenders on the street.

Oklahoma’s preferred answer for crime has collided head-on with a budget deficit estimated at $600 million, and prison costs that have increased more than 30 percent in the last decade. For years, lawmakers have pushed each other to lengthen prison sentences and increase the number of criminals behind bars. Not now: This week, new Republican Speaker of the House Kris Steele is expected to unveil a package of proposals that would divert thousands of nonviolent lawbreakers from the prison system and ramp up paroles. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 1, 2011 in Stupid Republican Tricks

 

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