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His Church Doesn’t Even Want the Cumph!

Seems that some things…Even Christians can’t forgive.

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Trump’s childhood church no longer wants him: ‘His policies go against our Biblical teaching’

A new CNN report on President Donald Trump’s fraught relationship to Christianity reveals that not only is the president unwelcome in his childhood church in Queens, but that the son of the last religious leader he was close to has publicly renounced him.

According to the report by journalist MJ Lee, the evolution of Trump’s quasi-Christianity took him from First Presbyterian Church in Jamaica, Queens, where he was raised and confirmed, to Marble Collegiate Church in Manhattan.

Although Trump was close to Marble’s former reverend and author of the bestselling self-help book “Power of Positive Thinking” Norman Vincent Peale, the late pastor’s son has publicly rebuked the president. Prior to the election, Peale’s son John said he “cringes” when Trump invoked his fathers name on the campaign trail.

“I don’t respect Mr. Trump very much. I don’t take him very seriously. I regret the publicity of the connection,” Peale’s son wrote. “This is a problem for the Peale family.”

The Peale family weren’t the only ones to distance themselves from Trump — during the campaign, Marble Collegiate issued a statement rejecting Trump’s claims that he attends their church and stated he “is not an active member.”

Though the Trump family is reportedly church-less, the president enjoys touting the religiosity of his supporters.

“I did very, very well with evangelicals in the polls,” the president reportedly told the pastors of First Presbyterian Church and Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, who “gently reminded Trump that neither of them was an evangelical.”

Although First Presbyterian, Trump’s childhood church, had an affluent all-white congregation when he attended as a boy, it’s now almost entirely comprised of people of color — many of whom are critical of the president’s policy and rhetoric.

“The policies he’s promoting go against our biblical teaching,” Philip Malebranche, a first-generation Haitian immigrant and First Presbyterian parishioner told CNN. “Our president should be representing us and not a minority of people.”

When Lee asked Malebranche if Trump would be welcome at First Presbyterian today, he expressed apprehension.

“What spirit would the President bring to this congregation on a Sunday morning?” he told CNN. “I would be very skeptical.”

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Black…And Jewish – Hebrew Israelites

Black folks can be Jewish. Some claim black folks from Ethiopia were one of the original tribes. This fascinating history is about the formation of what was probably the first black Jewish Congregation in America.

Hebrew Israelite congregants sing during Sabbath worship services, with elders and community leaders nearest the pulpit.

When Passover Is About American Slavery

A plantation houseboy grew up to be a prophet—and inspired a religious movement.

More than 1,000 men and women gathered this past week in coastal Virginia to celebrate Passover and retell the ancient story of how Moses led the Israelites from bondage to freedom. They were observing holiday traditions that Jews all across the world observe—only these celebrants were not Jews.

Their memories of slavery and liberation concerned not a distant past in Egypt, but a story set in the United States. Their prophet was an African American man born into slavery. He preached to a Christian audience, telling them to incorporate Hebraic practices into their faith out of a desire to return to the true Church as he envisioned it, and based his new Church on both Old and New Testaments. Their Promised Land was a plot in Virginia where descendants of black men and women could gather and be safe from the scourge of white supremacy.

Temple Beth El in Belleville is the headquarters of the Church of God and Saints of Christ, the largest and oldest organization of Hebrew Israelites in the country. Hebrew Israelites are people of color, mostly African American, who identify as descendants of the biblical Israelites. Passover is among the holiest weeks on this group’s calendar. Members travel from across the country and abroad to spend days in near-constant worship in a place they call Canaan Land, after the land promised by God to Abraham in the book of Genesis.

“Just as Israelites of the Bible had their Land of Canaan filled with milk and honey, this is our land of milk and honey,” said Melvin Smith, 46, a fourth-generation congregant from nearby Portsmouth, Virginia. “This is our refuge.”

The group remains little known outside its own ranks, despite over a century of history, tens of thousands of members, and outposts that fan across America, Africa, and the Caribbean. Religion scholars are given scarce, if any, access to the organization’s archives. Leadership guards the legacy of the group closely. Photography is rarely permitted inside sanctuaries. Internal materials, like the group’s unique hymnal, are not to be reproduced or shared with outsiders.

“The Church of God and Saints of Christ is one of the most important religious bodies in America that few people have ever heard of,” said Jacob Dorman, professor of history at the University of Kansas and author of Chosen People: The Rise of American Black Israelite Religions.

At an evening service last week, hundreds of congregants filed into pews. The sanctuary, opened only on special holidays, was filled nearly to capacity. Saints, as members call themselves, were dressed in the formal garb that has been part of their tradition for generations. The men wore sashes across their shoulders, long-tailed suit jackets, black kippahs, and white gloves. Some wore thin white prayer shawls, or tallits, on their necks. The women were dressed in sashes, brown pleated skirts, and brightly colored headdresses fixed with glittering brooches.

At the center of the room was a large Torah ark decorated with a fabric banner that read “Shalom” in Hebrew, flanked by two seven-pronged menorahs. The chief rabbi, a retired math professor named Phillip E. McNeil, stood behind the pulpit. At 75, he exudes a quiet authority. He spoke lightly into a microphone and the crowd hushed. They had been worshipping together for a week straight. “Are you tired yet?” McNeil joked. “There’s nothing like worshiping the God of Israel, is there?”

A younger evangelist followed McNeil onto the stage and picked up the Passover theme, which ran through almost every sermon. “I’m here to remember that day we came out of Egypt,” Frank Johnson said. “In every age, He’s still passing over, still executing judgment, still demanding that the oppressed go free.”

A choir of hundreds broke into song, complex four-part a capella sung by heart. The lyrics of the songs are composed by congregants and delivered to them, it’s said, through divine dreams. This evening’s choir master pumped his fists in the air, readjusting the kippah on his head as music filled the sanctuary.

Collin McGhie, from North Carolina, sang along, shifting his weight from right to left and clapping. McGhie was raised a Seventh-day Adventist and joined this organization six years ago. “I come here for a spiritual recharge,” McGhie said.

This past week, it seemed that not only McGhie but the entire congregation had come to spiritually recharge and regain its balance. Last year, the group’s leader, Chief Rabbi Jehu August Crowdy, died suddenly just before Passover. He was only 46. The organization reeled. McNeil was quickly selected to take his place. This Passover marked a year since McNeil assumed the position.

The late Crowdy was the great-grandson of a man named William Saunders Crowdy, who founded the Church of God and Saints of Christ in 1896. He was born in Maryland in 1847 and spent his childhood as an enslaved houseboy on a plantation where his mother was a cook. As a free adult, Crowdy was one of a generation of spiritual leaders who taught that African Americans were descended from the Israelites of the bible—and that they should return to this ancient way of life….Read More About This Fascinating Group Here

 
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Posted by on April 20, 2017 in Black History, Giant Negros

 

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The Church of the Really Feel Good!

The Right Reverend Feelgood is going to have a high time with a literally euphoric congregation!

Old Hippies never die…They just huff away.

At Denver’s Newest Church, Marijuana Is The Holy Sacrament

“We are all ‘high’ priests,” said a member of the International Church of Cannabis.

The International Church of Cannabis will open its doors in Denver on April 20, a day marijuana enthusiasts everywhere have memorialized as a sort of “high” holy day.

The church is not your average house of worship, for obvious reasons. But the religion it preaches, members say, is no joke.

Members of the church are known as Elevationists. Their faith holds that “an individual’s spiritual journey, and search for meaning, is one of self-discovery that can be accelerated and deepened with ritual cannabis use,” according to the church’s website.

“We do not believe in authoritarian structures, nor do we profess the arrogance of knowing God’s mind,” Elevationist Lee Molloy told The Huffington Post. “There are no Grand Poobah’s or High Priests ― well, we are all ‘high’ priests ― rather, we are all on our own quest to be the best self we can be, and to give back to the community with our talents and labor.”

Church members refer to cannabis as “the sacred flower,” which Molloy described as “a gift from the Universal Creative Force.”

Ritual use of cannabis has a long, well-documented history dating back over 3,000 years, according to Mark S. Ferrara, an associate professor of English at the State University of New York and author of Sacred Bliss: A Spiritual History of Cannabis.

“In low dosages, such as those achieved by inhalation and through tinctures, cannabis produces a mild euphoric effect employed by shamans and herbal healers across time and culture,” Ferrara writes.

One of the earliest recorded mentions of cannabis comes from The Vedas, a set of ancient Hindu texts. To this day, many people in India enjoy a drink called bhang, made from the leaves of the female cannabis plant. Adherents of Rastafari, an Africa-centred religion that formed in Jamaica in the 1930s, also use marijuana to aid in meditation and community bonding.

As Molloy puts it: “When we ritually take cannabis our mind is elevated and we become a better version of self.”

Marijuana is legal in Colorado, with some caveats. Residents cannot smoke or consume the plant in public ― including at “social clubs” ― which has posed some challenges for the church’s organizers.

“We are being forced to jump hoops by the City,” said Molloy in an email to HuffPost. For now, all programming and ritual cannabis use will be by invitation only. Programming will include guest speakers, comedians, artists, musicians and film screenings. Visitors can come to the church between 12:00 p.m. to 2 p.m. daily to see the space, but no burning will be allowed in the building during those hours, Molloy said….Read the rest Here

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Posted by on April 20, 2017 in The Post-Racial Life

 

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DC Churches to Trump…You Can Show Up, But We Won’t be Extending and Invitation

Guess the Devil won’t be welcome in DC Churches, unlike every other previous President.

If he does show up…Better call an Exorcist

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Will D.C. churches invite Donald Trump to come worship?

Every four or eight years, after the nation goes through the ritual of picking a president, some of Washington’s churches go through another ritual — getting a president to pick them.

When Bill and Hillary Clinton came to town in 1993, preachers from Baptist (his denomination) and Methodist (hers) churches across town picked up their phones and their pens to invite the new first couple to their pews. After hearing from at least half a dozen congregations, the Clintons picked Foundry United Methodist Church on 16th Street NW, where they became active members.

George W. Bush, like Ronald Reagan before him, opted for the convenience of St. John’s Episcopal Church, just across from the White House. Ministers from numerous denominations tried to woo the Obamas, but the first family never picked one church, instead visiting many churches over the course of their eight years in the White House.

And now it’s time to ask: Will President Trump go to church in Washington?

It may not be likely. Trump has previously been affiliated with Presbyterian churches, and he identifies as a mainline Protestant, but he is not a regular churchgoer.

Still, The Washington Post emailed or called all 16 churches in the District affiliated with Presbyterian Church (USA), the largest mainline Presbyterian denomination, to find out: Is the same sort of jockeying going on to get this president into the pews?

In short: No. One minister of one of the denomination’s churches closest to the White House responded to The Post’s inquiry, “Are you kidding?” When a reporter replied that in fact the question was quite earnest, the minister then said that, come to think of it, he would send Trump a letter of invitation.

Presbyterian Church (USA) is a liberal-leaning denomination that has embraced same-sex marriage. Several of these churches in the District are led by female clergy, and several have black clergy and predominantly black communities as well as members from other racial minorities. Some are located in neighborhoods east of the Anacostia where Washington’s politicians rarely venture. And of course, all of them are located in the District, where more than 92 percent of voters last week voted for Hillary Clinton instead of Trump.

The response from most of these churches was essentially: Trump will be very welcome, if he thinks a church like this is his cup of tea.

  • Capitol Hill Presbyterian’s Rev. Scott Wilson: “Our doors are open to everyone to worship with us and listen to the words of Jesus on love and compassion. Capitol Hill Presbyterian Church is a welcoming and inclusive church, and our doors are always open to anyone who wishes to join us in our community exploring faith, joyfully sustained by the love of God, caring about each other, and the needs of a broken world.”
  • Fifteenth Street Presbyterian’s Rev. Robert Bell: “I think Mr Trump would be welcome at any Presbyterian Church USA in the city. I know he, like everyone is, would be welcome at ours. He doesn’t seem like the type of guy that finds the gospel challenging and meaningful or likes to rub elbows with a diverse group, not all [of whom] are materially successful. But God works in mysterious ways.”
  • Georgetown Presbyterian’s Rev. Camille Cook Murray: “We have not reached out to Donald Trump. Our congregation is a politically diverse church, unified by our common faith in Jesus Christ. … Our community is open and welcome to all so yes, if Donald felt called to join our church then he would be welcome.”
  • National Presbyterian’s Rev. David Renwick: “National Presbyterian has a long legacy of serving presidents, appointed officials, and elected officials on both sides of the aisle, as well as those who serve our nation in both military and civilian capacities. This is clearly a tradition we want to honor and carry forward — and therefore we warmly welcome our president-elect to join with us in worship. … With regard to membership — membership is open to any person who knows their need of a savior, who places their trust in Jesus Christ as their Savior and Lord, and who commits to be faithful in worshiping and serving God together.”
  • New York Avenue Presbyterian’s Rev. Roger Gench: “We would, of course, invite the President-Elect to worship with us.  Our logo declares that we are a ‘just-seeking and inclusive church,’ so we welcome people from varied points of view, race, and sexual orientation.

 
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Posted by on November 16, 2016 in Second American Revolution

 

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Racists Anonymous Meetings…

No joke. A Church in North Carolina has started weekly group meetings.

North Carolina Church Holding Weekly Racists Anonymous Meetings

A church in North Carolina is taking 12 steps towards helping to improve America’s racial divide.

Every Wednesday, Trinity United Church of Christ in Concord hosts a Racists Anonymous (RA) meeting.

Church minister, Rev. Nathan King told WCNC TV that RA is meant to “deal with the racism within ourselves and to eliminate the racism within ourselves.”

King said the group was inspired by the number of high-profile police shootings in recent years as well as the Charleston church shooting in June 2015, where a white gunman killed nine black parishioners.

“It seemed like every week we were coming into worship and we were doing another prayer because someone had been killed in the street,” King told the station.

Sick of the shootings and racial unrest, King added that he wanted to do more than pray.

The group uses a modified version of the 12-step program pioneered by Alcoholics Anonymous, according to a recent Facebook post

A group devoted to helping people overcome personal racism might seem strange to some, but not King who told WCNC TV:

“It may not be the first thing you want to talk about the table at the Thanksgiving dinner with your family, but those conversations are going to be more common going forward.”

 
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Posted by on August 26, 2016 in The Post-Racial Life

 

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Bringing Racist Policing to It’s Knees in Cleveland

Not sure why the Republicans chose to have their convention in Cleveland – but with the atmosphre created by their current candidate it’s going to be one hell of a mess.

In the meantime, in the city whose police murdered Tamir Rice and got away with it…There is change afoot.

The Preacher Who Took on the Police

Cop shootings have torn apart Cleveland. Jawanza Colvin says the way to heal the city is to root out racism from the legal system.

CLEVELAND — One night in February, a black preacher put the prosecutors on trial.

It had been two months since the prosecutor’s office in Cleveland’s Cuyahoga County persuaded a grand jury not to indict a white police officer who had shot and killed Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old boy, in a city park.

Now the prosecutor was running for reelection, and with the primary a month away, the Rev. Jawanza Karriem Lightfoot Colvin saw an opportunity to indict a judicial system that he had come to believe was rigged against black people. He and the activist group he co-founded summoned the two candidates—embattled county prosecutor Tim McGinty and challenger Mike O’Malley—to a forum at a synagogue in a Cleveland suburb.

There, Colvin thundered like judge, jury and executioner: “If you were young, poor, a minority of color, or one who lived in the city, you were profiled, arrested, charged, indicted, convicted and sentenced at an alarming, disproportionate level.” His preacher’s cadence brought the crowd of 1,000 at the Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple to its feet—black and white, Jewish and Christian.

“We want action now! We want change now! We want reform now!” Colvin proclaimed. “Not next year, not next election! Not ’til the next death, the next tragedy, the next trial, the next press conference! We want it now!”

He had to wait just four weeks. McGinty lost the primary on March 15, all but assuring O’Malley of election in November. The vote further raised the local profile of a young religious leader who has vaulted to prominence in the wake of the Tamir Rice case. Some in this key city in a crucial swing state see what he has accomplished on an issue that has embroiled the entire country and predict that it might propel Colvin onto the national political stage.

Colvin, 41, is the pastor of Olivet Institutional Baptist Church, a large and storied African-American congregation in Cleveland, and he has taken a very different and far more aggressive approach to activism than older black ministers from the civil-rights generation. As co-founder of Greater Cleveland Congregations, a five-year-old community organizing group, Colvin has built alliances across majority-white Cuyahoga County on social justice issues. After Rice’s death and a damning report from the U.S. Justice Department, Colvin stood nearly alone among the city’s politically involved black ministers in challenging Frank Jackson, Cleveland’s popular African-American mayor, and publicly pressuring City Hall for changes in how Cleveland is policed.

“I would’ve liked to see bolder leadership,” Colvin says. “I think we undershot what true change looks like.”

When the 2,472 delegates, 15,000 media and 30,000 assorted other dignitaries, lobbyists and staff arrive next month for the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, they’ll be greeted by untold numbers of protesters. The Rev. Colvin, who plans to join two marches on the first day, will be at the center of the action, pushing an agenda of judicial reform that is gaining more national attention, even acceptance in conservative circles. But conventiongoers should expect to be challenged, even shocked, by Colvin’s message.

“The criminal justice system,” Colvin says, “in many respects, has replaced slavery.”…Read the Rest Here

 

 
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Posted by on June 17, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Southern Baptists Reject confederate Flag

I wouldn’t have thought this possible as little as 20 years ago…

U.S. Southttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_tIxFJhR5khern Baptists Formally Repudiate Confederate Flag

The resolution calls for Southern Baptist churches to discontinue displaying the Confederate flag as a “sign of solidarity of the whole Body of Christ.”

The U.S. Southern Baptist Convention adopted a resolution on Tuesday repudiating the Confederate battle flag as an emblem of slavery, marking the latest bid for racial reconciliation by America’s largest Protestant denomination.

The resolution, passed at the predominantly white convention’s annual meeting in St. Louis, calls for Southern Baptist churches to discontinue displaying the Confederate flag as a “sign of solidarity of the whole Body of Christ.”

The action came four years after the denomination elected its first black president, Fred Luter, a pastor and civic leader from New Orleans.

Rev. Fred Luter was named the denomination’s first black president four years ago.

In 1995, a Southern Baptist committee issued a resolution apologizing to African-Americans for condoning slavery and racism during the early years of the denomination’s 171-year history.

The convention, currently made up of more than 46,000 churches nationwide, was established in 1845 after Southern Baptists split from the First Baptist Church in America in the pre-Civil War era over the issue of slavery.

The denomination now counts a growing number of minorities among its more than 15.8 million members and has sought in recent years to better reflect the diversity of its congregants and America as a whole.

“This denomination was founded by people who wrongly defended the sin of human slavery,” said Russell Moore, head of the convention’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission. “Today the nation’s largest Protestant denomination voted to repudiate the Confederate battle flag, and it’s time and well past time.”

The flag carried by the South’s pro-slavery Confederate forces during the 1861-65 U.S. Civil War re-emerged as a flashpoint in America’s troubled race relations after the massacre of nine blacks by a white gunman at an historic church in Charleston, South Carolina, in June 2015. The assailant was seen afterward in photographs posing with the flag.

The episode stirred a movement to eliminate the Stars and Bars flag – seen by many whites as a sign of Southern heritage, not hate – from South Carolina’s statehouse and many other public displays in the South during the months that followed.

 
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Posted by on June 15, 2016 in The Post-Racial Life

 

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