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Tag Archives: Charleston Massacre

Dylann Roof Gets Death Sentence

I have a great idea – let his Trumpazoid ass out in Gen Pop for a while…Before they hang him.

Dylann Roof Sentenced to Death, Asked for Mercy but Showed No Remorse

The racist killer asked for his life to be spared but said he had no regrets about murdering nine black worshipers in Bible study.

Dylann Roof will be executed for shooting dead nine worshipers during a Bible study in a historically black church, making him the first person sentenced to death for federal hate crimes.

A 12-person jury returned the sentence Tuesday at the Charleston Federal Courthouse after deliberating for three hours. The punishment follows Roof’s conviction in December on 33 charges related to the massacre at Emanuel A.M.E. Church on June 17, 2015.

Roof listened to the sentence without much expression, occasionally putting on a closed-lip smile that looked like a nervous reaction.

Roof’s murder of the parishioners shocked a public already nauseated by mass shootings in seemingly every place imaginable by introducing a new setting for bloodshed: church. His victims ranged in age from 26 to 87 and included a pastor and state senator, family matriarchs and patriarchs, a retired teacher, a track coach and speech therapist, a librarian, two mothers of teenage children, and a young college graduate.

Two women and two children survived the shooting by hiding under a desk and table as 77 bullets flew through the basement walls and victims’ bodies that evening at the conclusion of Bible study, the gunfire erupting from Roof’s Glock .45 just as the group closed their eyes and stood to pray. Another woman was spared by Roof. He told her she could live in order to tell others of the killings.

“Did I shoot you yet?” Polly Sheppard recalled Roof asking her as he pointed a gun at her body. “I’m not going to,” Roof said. “I need you to tell the story.”

Assorted observers, aghast at the consequences of Roof’s ruthless shooting rampage, sought to counteract his actions through public displays of unity and love. At Roof’s bond hearing two days after the shooting, numerous relatives of the shooting victims drew on their religious faith and told the then-21-year-old defendant they forgave him. Meanwhile, Charleston residents gathered at public vigils to honor the dead and promote a message of unity, at one point marching across Charleston’s iconic Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge by the thousands.

President Obama traveled to Charleston for the funeral of Rev. Clementa Pinckney, 41, who was also a South Carolina state senator. Obama eulogized Pinckney and, to much acclaim, then broke into song, leading a soulful rendition of “Amazing Grace.” Weeks later South Carolina leaders removed the Confederate flag from the grounds of the statehouse in the capital, Columbia, and relocated the banner to a museum. Regarded by many as a symbol of hate and intolerance, the flag was featured in many pictures Roof took of himself with guns before committing his crime in Charleston.

But as all these groups of people sought to promote healing in a nation continually fractured by gun violence and racial conflicts, Roof sat in a jail cell in Charleston and wrote a nearly 40-page statement that offered no apologies and denigrated almost every race of people on this earth, including white people whom he deemed “cowards” for not standing up to Roof’s perceived assaults by the “lower races.” This statement, along with drawings filled with racist symbols, complemented another racist manifesto Roof posted online on the afternoon before his crime.

During Tuesday’s sentencing proceedings, Roof, dressed in a green sweater and speaking softly as he represented himself in court, addressed the jury considering his fate, saying that while “I didn’t have to do anything… I felt like I had to do it and I still feel like I had to do it.” He mostly avoided talking about his crime and victims, offering no remorse, but conceding, “I think that, ummm, it’s safe to say no one in their right mind wants to go in a church and kill people.”

Roof then disputed the government’s depiction of him as a man filled with hatred, especially for black people.

“Wouldn’t it be fair to say the prosecution hates me since they’re trying to give me the death penalty?” Roof asked.

“My point is,” he continued, “anyone who hates anything in their mind has a good reason for it.”

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Why Does The FBI Ignore The Council of Conservative Citizens Hate Group?

The C of CC is probably the most prominent hate group in America. They count and have counted as members people like former Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott of Mississippi, former RNC Chair Haley Barber, and a host of other Republican politicians. It would seem that those relationships have shielded the organization form the just scrutiny of the DOJ and FBI…Sometimes referred to as the KKK in suits, the C of CC advances and agenda no less toxic than the other white supremacist groups.

So, if looking for culpability in the organization which poured hate into Dylaan Roots head – you need to aim a little higher at the Republican congressmen and Senators who actively resisted the FBI stepping in on their friends and partners.

The FBI Ignored Dylann Roof’s Hate Group

The feds say they didn’t investigate the group that helped inspire the killer, but even hate speech is free speech—until it promotes violence.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation said it did not investigate the hate group that inspired Dylann Roof to kill nine black parishioners in Charleston, South Carolina last year.

FBI spokeswoman Jillian Stickels told The Daily Beast that there is no record of an investigation into the Council of Conservative Citizens. This comes after The Daily Beast requested FBI files on the group through the Freedom of Information Act. The FBI did not respond to requests for files on the CCC’s most prominent leaders.

The FOIA request also covered one week following the June 17, 2015 attack, indicating that the FBI wasn’t looking into the group even after it was revealed that Roof cited the CCC in his manifesto.

Roof wrote that he Googled “black on White crime” and found them.

“The first website I came to was the Council of Conservative Citizens. There were pages upon pages of these brutal black on White murders,” Roof said, adding that more research led him to “fight” a race war.

After the Charleston shooting, the CCC’s webmaster first said the FBI was looking into suspected ties between him and Roof, and then later denied being part of any investigation.

The Council of Conservative Citizens was founded in 1985. It was meant to be a successor to the White Citizens Councils formed to oppose desegregation following the Supreme Court’s 1954 Brown v. Board of Education. (Justice Thurgood Marshall called the councils the “uptown Klan.”) The FBI maintainedextensive records on the earlier Citizens’ Councils, particularly in the ‘50s and ‘60s.

Senator Trent Lott posed with officials of the pro-white Council of Conservative Citizens in 1997. From left, William D. Lord, state coordinator; Mr. Lott; Tom Dover, president, and Gordon L. Baum, executive officer.

But the practice apparently did not continue, despite inflammatory statements from the new CCC. In the 1980s, the CCC called blacks “genetically inferior.” In 2001, the CCC website said, “God is the author of racism. God is the One who divided mankind into different types. Mixing the races is rebelliousness against God.”

Racist statements don’t automatically trigger an FBI investigation, of course. What’s usually needed is a link to a threat of violence or criminal activity. Recent prosecutions of ISIS members show that the government may investigate and prosecute people for as little as re-blogging an image that calls for violence.

Other hate groups have been investigated by the FBI, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, including the Aryan Nations, the National Alliance, and several neo-Nazi groups.

From the C of CC Newsletter

The director of the SPLC’s Intelligence Project speculated the CCC was not extreme enough to worry the FBI.

“It may be that they considered the Council to be too mainstream to investigate,” Heidi Beirich said. “After all, several GOP lawmakers including Trent Lott were very close to the group in the 1990s.”

The CCC was co-founded by two Democrats, former Georgia governor Lester Maddox and former Louisiana congressman John Rarick. Republican senator Trent Lott spoke to the CCC at least five times, as did Republican congressman Bob Barr in 1998. Mike Huckabee, another Republican, delivered a videotaped speech to the group in 1993 when he ran for governor of Arkansas.

Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, and prominent Republican supporter at a C of CC meeting in 2001

This historical one, just for fun –

 
 

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