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Donna Edwards, Rogue Democrat

Donna’s problem with the Congressional Black Caucus is she is more like Bernie, than Hillary. The CBC, which has sold their souls to the old guard, won’t support one of their own. Donna is refusing to be bought out by the old guard Democrat Party supporting a do-nothing CBC…

She apparently also isn’t real big on being a participant in the CBC Cabaret Circuit of expensive galas put on with taxpayer and donor money.

And that’s a problem.

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Edwards confronts black lawmakers over refusal to back her

Locked in a surprisingly competitive Senate race with party favorite Chris Van Hollen, Edwards is pressing for more support from the Congressional Black Caucus.

On the verge of a possible upset of the Democratic Party’s longtime golden boy, Rep. Chris Van Hollen, in Tuesday’s Maryland Senate primary, Rep. Donna Edwards has a question for her fellow members of the Congressional Black Caucus: Why aren’t more of you endorsing me?

POLITICO has learned that Edwards met privately last week with several CBC members to voice her frustration that so few African-American lawmakers had offered her their support, according to five sources familiar with the meetings.

Only four of the 46 CBC members — Reps. Gwen Moore of Wisconsin, Lacy Clay of Missouri, Robin Kelly of Illinois and Hank Johnson of Georgia — are backing Edwards over Van Hollen, an unusually small number for a group known for standing by fellow African-American lawmakers. Meanwhile, Van Hollen has been making hay over his growing number of endorsements from black political leaders in Maryland, including some in Edwards’ district, though he has yet to be endorsed by a CBC member.

Edwards, who won her House seat by defeating Al Wynn, a popular member of the CBC, in a Democratic primary in 2008, has had a strained relationship with many black lawmakers from the start. But with she and Van Hollen running nearly neck-and-neck in a primary that many expected Van Hollen to win easily, Edwards has been reaching out over the past two weeks to members of the CBC to ask why they’re not backing her bid to be only the second black woman elected to the U.S. Senate. She’s also pressed her case with lawmakers at the Democratic Club restaurant, where members often eat.

Sources close to the CBC and lawmakers familiar with the conversations said some of Edwards’ CBC colleagues responded to her in frank terms. Members of the CBC have long considered her abrasive and said she’s not an easy colleague to work with.

“She has not developed good relationships with the members of the CBC, quite frankly,” said a source familiar with the CBC. “A lot of people find her difficult.”

 

 
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Posted by on April 22, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

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Even the CBC Has Heartburn With Obama SCOTUS Choice

Support among Progressives and even old line Liberal factions of the Democrat party is tepid for Obama’s “compromise choice” for the vacant seat on the Supreme Court. This does not portend well for an all out confirmation fight. Would be nice if the CBC exhibits some cajones for a change. Sick of this one-way “compromise” shit. Obama may well find himself out in the cold with progressive support on this one, especially in view that the pending election is shaping up to be an all out donnybrook.

The CBC – Not Feeling the Love on Obama’s SCOTUS Pick

Black lawmakers irked by Obama’s Supreme Court choice

Some African-American lawmakers are urging their Congressional Black Caucus colleagues to skip a meeting with Valerie Jarrett because of discontent with President Barack Obama’s Supreme Court nominee.

Several black lawmakers are irked by Obama’s selection of a moderate judge instead of a progressive who could rally the base, according to three lawmakers and senior aides familiar with the meeting. They also don’t feel as if their input was adequately sought by the administration before Merrick Garland was nominated.

A source said members are asking themselves “what is the point” of attending the meeting now that Garland has been nominated.

And some black lawmakers questioned why Garland, who is white, was selected over a minority who could have made the court more diverse.

Jarrett, a senior advisor to Obama, was on the Hill Thursday to meet with the CBC about Garland’s nomination and other topics, according to a source.

The process to fill the late Antonin Scalia’s seat has been sharply acrimonious. Senate Republican leaders are refusing to hold confirmation hearings for Garland, saying Obama should not be able to influence the ideological bent of the court so close to a presidential election.

Progressives have expressed tepid support for Garland. National progressive groups said they wished the selection was more liberal but they still planned to back Obama in his fight with congressional Republicans.

 

 

 

 

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Silicon Valley Funds CBC Parties for “Diversity”

Perhaps I am a bit too cynical, but HTF does funding yet another cabaret make jobs for underemployed, and unemployed black tech workers?

And HTF is it that with 12% of the graduates in Computer Engineering being black, there is a “shortage in the school pipeline”?

Bullshit!

The way things are done in the tech business is you hire some competent recruiters (“headhunters”) to go and get what, and who you want to hire. There is no shortage of minority middle managers, tech staff, and senior tech staff – although you may have a hard time getting them to move to the West Coast whitopias anymore. That shouldn’t be an issue – because most of these companies have data centers and offices all over the east coast, and a lot of companies hire “virtual” workers…

I been in this business over 20 years, working in senior positions for startups, as well as big players and hold patents in the technology…I haven’t heard jack shidt from these people – although I do get calls from big eastern based companies.I know a couple of guys who read my blog are senior techies like myself…When exactly was the last time you got a recruiting call from Google or Amazon?

But I guess it is just easier to buy off the CBC with a couple of parties.

Under diversity pressure, tech courts minority groups in D.C.

Congressional Black Caucus chairman G.K. Butterfield warned that “talk is not enough,” in diversity in tech.

Some of Silicon Valley’s biggest tech companies are quietly funneling money to minority groups in Washington, including those affiliated with black and Hispanic lawmakers — a move that comes as the firms face growing criticism about the lack of diversity in their workforce.

The donations, known as “honorary expenses,” fund events like dinners and cocktail receptions where members of Congress and federal regulators are the guests of honor. The leader of the pack is Google, which spent a record of more than $490,000 on such expenses last year — devoting most of it to minority groups like the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, according to newly filed federal ethics reports.

Apple chipped in $1.2 million for an awards gala for the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, and Uber wrote a $10,000 check to the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, the disclosures show. It marked the first time either Apple or Uber reported any honorary expenses.

The recent uptick in these donations coincides with growing political pressure on the tech industry over diversity, as companies struggle to address complaints that their employees are largely white and male. The debate has taken root in Washington, including with members of the Congressional Black Caucus, which sent a delegationto Silicon Valley in August to demand that the industry recruit more African-Americans.

The tech industry’s newest tactics don’t appear to have quelled the outcry from Capitol Hill, and they don’t sit well with some diversity advocates.

“We’ve had years now of campaigning and advocacy around the diversity problem … [but] the only thing that’s gotten better with these companies are their talking points,” said Rashad Robinson, the executive director of ColorofChange, a nonprofit that works on civil rights issues. The problem, he added, is “not going to be solved by throwing money at the CBC and other institutions.”

Asked about their spending, Apple and Uber declined to comment for this story. A Google spokeswoman said the company believes it’s important to “help policymakers understand our business and the work we do to keep the Internet open and encourage economic opportunity.”

The Congressional Black Caucus Foundation and Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute serve as the educational and policy arms of their respective caucuses on Capitol Hill. While they’re technically separate organizations, many black and Hispanic lawmakers serve as board members for the nonprofit groups. The Thurgood Marshall College Fund, meanwhile, is a nonprofit that provides scholarships and other support for African-American students at historically black colleges and universities.

The CBC Foundation, for one, stressed that the tech industry’s donations have gone to a good cause. They’ve allowed for “professional development briefings for our interns offering them real-world, first-hand exposure to careers” in key tech fields, Shrita Sterlin-Hernandez, a spokeswoman for the group, said in a statement. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute and the Thurgood Marshall College Fund did not comment for this story.

But the checks can also double as powerful forms of leverage in Washington, where influence often is measured in dollar signs. “There are many ways companies and other organizations can establish a presence in Washington, and gain access to politicians. And one way to do that — that some people pay less attention to — is by giving money to a charitable cause that a politician is associated with,” said Viveca Novak, a spokeswoman for the Center for Responsive Politics.

Such contributions are a “well-trodden path,” in the words of Novak, for established industries in Washington, from big tobacco companies to telecom giants like AT&T and Comcast. The donations, in addition to supporting nonprofits, provide lobbyists with greater access to lawmakers and regulators.

And Silicon Valley certainly could use more allies in Washington when it comes to diversity issues.

Apple is almost 70 percent male globally and 54 percent white in the U.S., according to the company’s most recent diversity report, though the company emphasized that many of its new hires have been women, Asian, Hispanic and African-American. Google’s workforce is also 70 percent male globally and 60 percent white in the U.S., despite its own efforts to diversify. Uber, for its part, has not released a report detailing the composition of its employees.

Those poor report cards prompted the Congressional Black Caucus last May to launch an initiative dubbed Tech2020, hoping to pressure tech companies to add more African-Americans to their ranks. The CBC later dispatched top lawmakers to the Valley — including its chairman, Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.) — to make that point directly to executives at Apple, Google, Intel and other firms.

Butterfield sounded the theme again in September at the CBC Foundation’s annual legislative conference, where he warned that “talk is not enough. And we need more than an amen from the choir. … We want to see results.”

Tech companies have pledged to fix the problem, but as they invest in hiring initiatives, they’re also pumping big money into Washington. Over the course of last year, Google covered $150,000 in honorary expenses for the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, and provided an additional $95,000 in multiple checks to the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, according to an analysis of the ethics records.

Another roughly $150,000 in spending went to “various vendors” that aided events with women, black and Latino lawmakers, the records indicate. At the CBC Foundation’s annual legislative conference in September, Google played a key sponsorship role at a reception that featured FCC Commissioner Mignon Clyburn, according to an invitation for the event.

Google has donated to the CBC Foundation before, but its “honorary expenses” for the group and other minority organizations have increased in recent years. Asked whether this amounts to a form of lobbying, the CBC Foundation stressed in a statement that the support benefits the organization’s mission: “Our sponsors and partners provide support to our organization because they share our goals of providing important opportunities for the communities we serve.”…More

 

 
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Posted by on February 29, 2016 in The New Jim Crow

 

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Calling Bulls**t on the Congressional Black Caucus

The battle over the replacement for deceased SC Justice Scalia has nothing to do with race…

And a hell of a lot to do with the politics of which side of the political spectrum controls the Supreme Court, and get away with (or stop) criminal actions like Bush v Gore and Citizen’s United.

So while more than few of the Republican conservatives who are fighting against Obama replacing Scalia may indeed be racists – that is not the driving reason for the fight.

Rep. G.K. Butterfield, (D-N.C.), chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus

Black Lawmakers Say GOP Supreme Court Obstruction Is Racist

“It’s more than a political motive — it has a smell of racism.”

Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.), the chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, said that the backlash President Barack Obama currently faces around naming a Supreme Court nominee would never happen to a white president.

Speaking to The New York Times, Butterfield took issue with conservative comments in the wake of the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Several GOP politicians have said the vacancy shouldn’t be filled until a new president is in the White House.

“It’’s more than a political motive — it has a smell of racism,” Butterfield said.

“I can tick instance after instance over the last seven years where Republicans have purposely tried to diminish the president’s authority,” Butterfield continued. “This is just really extreme, and leads me to the conclusion that if this was any other president who was not African-American, it would not have been handled this way.”

In an interview with The Huffington Post, Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) said he agreed with the chairman’s comments.

“It is extremely alarming, and most African-Americans — and many others — believe that there is race involved in these pronouncements by the Republicans,” he said Thursday morning.

“The GOP has consistently tried to demean this president,” he added. “They have attacked him for everything from the color of suit he wears, to the Affordable Care Act — which they were for at one time.”

GOP senators, led by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) have said they won’t even consider any nominee put forward by Obama because they want to let the next White House occupant choose — hoping, of course, that a Republican wins the presidential election.

Democrats, however, have hit back hard, publicly shaming Republicans for declaring their intent to obstruct in advance. And a few Republicans have started to break from the party line and say they’d be willing to vote on a nominee.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton also implied that racism was in play this week, saying that Republicans are making statements about Obama as if “he wasn’t a real president.”

“Many Republicans talk in coded racial language about takers and losers. They demonize President Obama and encourage the ugliest impulses of the paranoid fringe,” Clinton said at the Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture earlier this week in Harlem. “This kind of hatred and bigotry has no place in our politics or our country.”

 
 

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The CBC…Again

Donna Edwards is a pretty decent politician, and unlike some folks in the House and Senate has a pretty clean reputation…I would have to believe she would have a pretty good shot at winning a Senate Seat in Maryland.Looks to me like some “small wiener” politics on the part of a certain Caucus member.

Congressional Black Caucus PAC passes on Edwards nod

The political arm of the Congressional Black Caucus has decided not to endorse Rep.Donna Edwards for Senate — despite the fact that the Prince George’s County Democrat would be the first African-American elected to the chamber from Maryland.

The CBC’s political action committee decided to table Edwards’ endorsement during a meeting late Thursday night, multiple sources with knowledge of the decision told The Baltimore Sun. It is not clear whether the board will take up the matter again.

The decision, first reported by Politico, is a blow to Edwards, who has made the historic nature of her potential election a central component of her message, and who is hoping to turn out a high share of black voters in her campaign to succeed retiring Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski.

But that effort has been undercut by her opponent in the race, Rep. Chris Van Hollen of Montgomery County, who has secured endorsements from some of the state’s best known African American leaders, including Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker.

An Edwards campaign spokesman dismissed the decision, noting that former Rep. Al Wynn is a board member of the CBC’s political action committee. Edwards defeated Wynn in a 2008 primary  that was among the most closely watched House races in the nation at the time.

“This result does not come as a surprise given that former congressman turned lobbyist Al Wynn, whom Donna defeated in a Democratic primary in 2008, is an active member of the PAC board,” Edwards spokesman Ben Gerdes said in a statement.

Wynn, who represented Maryland’s 4th Congressional District from 1993 to 2008, declined to comment.

Several members of the Congressional Black Caucus have endorsed Edwards, including Democratic Reps. Lacy Clay of Missouri, Robin Kelly of Illinois, Hank Johnson of Georgia and Gwen Moore of Wisconsin. The caucus itself does not endorse candidates and the PAC’s board is made up of only a small number of CBC members.

Still, Edwards has received the support of only a fraction of the CBC’s 46 members.

There was initially a sense that some members were waiting out of respect for Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat and former CBC chairman who had considered a run for Senate himself. But when Cummings announced this month he would not seek the seat, there was no groundswell of CBC support directed toward Edwards.

A poll released in January by Gonzales Research & Marketing Strategies found a close race, with Van Hollen ahead only slightly and within the survey’s margin of error. Among black voters, however, Edwards led 65 percent to Van Hollen’s 15 percent.

 
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Posted by on February 13, 2016 in Democrat Primary, Stupid Democrat Tricks

 

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Congressional Black Caucus Endorses HIllary

No big surprise here. Whichever candidate Clyburn supports will likely win South Carolina. He has remained neutral so far. What this likely means is that Hillary will get a boost in South Carolina, although with Sanders inroads into the millennial generation, it certainly does not mean a slam dunk for Hillary. One of the things unknown at this point is how large the groundswell is against the Old Skool Politics of getting nothing done in the black community. I

Hillary attending what the CBC does best – throwing expensive parties for themselves.

Congressional Black Caucus backs Hillary Clinton

The Congressional Black Caucus’ political action committee endorsed Hillary Clinton Thursday, just as the Democratic presidential candidate is set to battle with rival Bernie Sanders at a PBS-hosted debate in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The CBC PAC formally announced its support of Clinton at a news conference near the Democratic National Committee headquarters in Washington, D.C.

“We must have a president who is knowledgeable on both domestic and foreign policy,” CBC chair Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-North Carolina, said Thursday. “Black lives are being lost on the streets of America because of police misconduct and gang violence…and so we must have a president that understands the racial divide.”

“After considering the entire field, there is no question in our mind and in our minds that one single candidate — one — possesses the patience, experience and temperament,” Butterfield continued, naming Clinton.

CBC members will hit the trail for the candidate in states where African Americans could swing the outcome of the primary, focusing particularly on South Carolina, where Democrats will gather to vote on Feb. 27.

One South Carolina member of the CBC, Rep. James Clyburn, has decided to remain neutral, despite the caucus’ choice to endorse.

But Clyburn, the third-ranking Democrat in the House and a giant in South Carolina politics, recently told MSNBC in an interview that he may change his mind.

“We’ll be meeting with family and friends this weekend when I get down to South Carolina and I’ll make some decision after that,” Clyburn said Thursday. “I won’t be making any endorsements today or this week.” Clyburn remained neutral in 2008, as well.

Last month, the CBC chairman Butterfield announced his endorsement for Clinton.

Butterfield penned an editorial for African American news outlet The Grio in January saying it “was not a hard decision” to back the former secretary of state.

“The black community matters, and black votes matter, which is why I publicly and proudly support Hillary Clinton for president,” Butterfield wrote. “From fixing the criminal justice system and reforming the voting process to creating jobs and promoting a diverse workplace, Clinton’s ambitions match our own.”

Clinton has courted minority voters throughout her campaign, which has led to her popularity in states with large African American and Latino populations.

That support has not helped Clinton in the nation’s first nominating contests, since Iowa and New Hampshire have little racial diversity.

 
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Posted by on February 11, 2016 in Democrat Primary

 

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BLM vs Congressional Black Caucus (CBC)

As I have said before, the CBC is misnamed. The acronym really means the Congressional Black Cabaret, as they seem to have no problems putting on expensive extravaganzas to their benefit, and getting absolutely nothing done legislatively.

Is there a “generation gap” between the CBC and BLM?

Wrong question.

Black Lives Matter Would Like To See A Little More Help From Congressional Black Caucus

Both groups agree a dual-pronged attack on racism would work best.

It’s no secret that many Black Lives Matter and other African-American activists feel disconnected from members of the Congressional Black Caucus.

From Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) telling protesters in Baltimore to “go home” after Freddie Gray’s death to Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) scolding protesters for drowning out Hillary Clinton’s remarks in Atlanta, the generation gap is clear.

The Black Lives Matter movement has reignited a long-ignored conversation about police brutality, pushed two Democratic presidential candidates to releasecriminal justice platforms, and even infiltrated pop culture as a topic on “Law & Order: SVU.”

Meanwhile, younger activists wonder what the CBC is really doing for black people.

“I had no idea it was actually a group in Congress,” said Kwame Rose, a 21-year-old Baltimore activist best known for confronting Fox News anchor Geraldo Rivera.

“Are they relevant? I don’t think a lot of people are relevant in the form that they aren’t effectively creating change for the people they are representing,” Rose added. “A lot of people get attention for putting ‘black’ or ‘activist’ in front of their name, but if they aren’t on the ground doing work, they aren’t relevant.”

Several CBC members who spoke with The Huffington Post were surprised to hear suggestions about a generation gap.

“You’re questioning the relevance of the Congressional Black Caucus? Therein lies a problem right there,” said Rep. Donald Payne Jr. (D-N.J.), who granted that the caucus may need to better explain its work. “We are fighting every single day for the things they are talking about. We have been at it for years. We know how important this is. They’re our children. They’re our babies. They’re our grandchildren. They matter to us.”

Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.), the chairman of the caucus, said the CBC embraces the Black Lives Matter agenda, supports the movement and is willing to partner with and learn from millennial leaders in communities of color.

“I don’t want to accept the argument of the generational gap between the Congressional Black Caucus and our young leaders — and if there is one, we need to remove it,” Butterfield said. “Many of us are products of the [civil rights] movement. When you are a product of that, it’s in your DNA. It’s what you believe about and fight for every day. We want millennials and Black Lives Matter to understand we are engaged at a different level.”…Read the Rest of “The Wrong Question” Here

 
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Posted by on January 18, 2016 in American Greed, BlackLivesMatter

 

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