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Former Rep Corrine Brown Sentenced to 5 Years

The CBC’s Party Queen has met her just end….

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Corrine Brown sentenced to 5 years in federal prison

A federal judge in Jacksonville on Monday sentenced former Democratic Rep. Corrine Brown to five years in federal prison after she was convicted last May on corruption charges for her role in using a scam charity to bilk donors and use the money for personal expenses, the Florida Times-Union reported.

The 71-year-old disgraced congresswoman’s chief of staff, Ronnie Simmons, got 48 months in prison, while the founder of the charity, One Door for Education President Carla Wiley, received a 21-month sentence for her role.

U.S. District Judge Timothy Corrigan said Brown abused the public trust to carry out a criminal conspiracy, the newspaper reported.

“This is a sad day for everyone,” said Corrigan after sentencing Brown to prison. “I was impressed with all the outpouring of support for you, and I think it’s a tribute to all the work you’ve done over the years. That’s what makes this all the more tragic.”

“This was a crime born of entitlement and greed, committed to supporting a lifestyle that was beyond their means,” said Corrigan. “Just think of the good that could have been done with that money if it would have been used for its intended purpose.”

Brown was also given three years probation. Brown’s attorney says her client plans to file an appeal.

The prison sentence marks the end of a legendary figure in Florida politics.

In 1992, Brown, of Jacksonville, was the first African-American from Florida to be elected to Congress since Reconstruction. She was best known for her slogan “Corrine Delivers,” a nod to the fact that she had knack for securing federal funding for her district.

In the 2016 Democratic primary, she was defeated by former state Sen. Al Lawson. The corruption case haunted her on the campaign trail. Her loss was also attributed to the fact that she joined state Republicans in opposing changes to her 5th Congressional District, which became a national poster child for gerrymandering. For years, the district snaked from Orlando to Jacksonville, picking up pockets of black communities and cities along the way. The seat was politically good for Brown, but made the surrounding congressional districts whiter and more Republican-leaning.

After a lengthy court battle over the newly drawn seats, Brown’s congressional district was redrawn to stretch east-west from Jacksonville to the Tallahassee region. It’s still overwhelmingly Democratic, but Brown departed from near Democratic consensus to oppose the changes because it lowered the number of black voters in the seat.

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Posted by on December 4, 2017 in Orange Jumsuit Politicians

 

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CBC Refuses Second Meeting with Chumph

Not sure why they even bothered to send representatives to the first meeting – but it seems they have finally recovered from their usual comatose state.

What I would like to see is some disruption, delay, and delegitimization of the entire Republican House and the Chumph.

One of the ways that could start is with a walkout until Sessions is gone. A complete refusal to participate in a process which is inherently and purposefully racist.

 

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All Y’all Colored Folks Know Each Other in DC!

I grew up in the DC area. I certainly know of the various high level people from the News, run into Congressmen and Senators on the street, and have even met with some in business matters.

DC, like almost any Urban area has cliques. There is nothing some black folks love more than setting up, or being a part of an “exclusive” group, which – pretty much like the Emmy’s and Academy Awards…They get to pat themselves on the back telling each other how great they are.

I have never attended a CBC Cabaret, and generally, unless roped into it, avoid such throw downs. I do, and have attended major charity events, and political fundraisers for specific politicians…Life in the City.

Now, the way things work in this city, is the most powerful clique in the city surrounds the President and Congress. When the President wants to meet with someone in Congress, he tells his staff to make a call. The  old “My people will be in contact with your people”.Under most circumstances the underlings coordinate schedules, set up time and place, and mark calendars – with the unwritten understanding that said invited Congressmen and Senators will make room on heir schedules to resolve conflicts.

Asking a reporter from a news organization is out of line. Not only that, but it is an insult to the CBC, in that somehow they don’t belong in the group of other Congressmen and Senators at the President’s beck and call – and thus need to be treated as an outside organization. The racial implications of that are equally horrendous in that it goes back to the old “All y’all look alike” racist syndrome.

 

 
 

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“Pig” Painting to Be Removed From Capitol

In yet another stunning hypocrisy, the student painting which led to hate acts by Republican Congressmen has been ordered to be removed from the Art Display.

As if the Statues of Former Confederate President and Vice President Jefferson Davis and Alexander Hamilton Stephens, and Confederate General Robert E. Lee – as well as the architect of the Civil War John Calhoun….aren’t divisive.

Painting at Center of Censorship Debate to Be Removed From Capitol

A controversial painting depicting policemen as pigs will be removed from the U.S. Capitol after the Architect of the Capitol concluded on Friday that it violates standards set by the House Office Buildings Commission. The racially charged student painting, which focuses on the riots that erupted in Ferguson after Michael Brown was fatally shot in 2014, has already triggered a battle between lawmakers. Rep. Lacy Clay, who decided to hang the painting in the U.S. Capitol, had faced off against GOP lawmakers who said the painting was too disrespectful to law enforcement to have on display. Late Friday, Rep. David Reichert’s complaint against the painting appeared to bring the whole saga to a close. Reichert’s office said the Architect of the Capitol has ordered the painting to be removed because it violates a rule that bans artwork depicting “contemporary political controversies.” The painting is now due to be removed Tuesday, according to POLITICO. Reichert praised the decision to take down the artwork that he described as a “slap in the face” to law enforcement. Clay, who has argued that it would be nothing short of censorship to remove the paining, has not yet commented on the news.

Confederate Traitors in the Capitol –

Jefferson Davis – President of the Confederacy

Robert E, Lee General of a Confederate Army which slaughtered escaping slaves

Alexander Hamilton Stephens – VP of the Confederacy

John C Calhoun, slaver, author of confederacy and Civil War, murderer

 

 
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Posted by on January 15, 2017 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Is the Congressional Black Caucus Finally “Getting It”?

It appears that a painting done by a teen from Ferguson may have touched off “fighting words” between racist Republicans and members of the Congressional Black Caucus…

Perhaps the CBC is belatedly growing a spine.

Perhaps they should remove some of these confederate pictures and statues which hand in the Capitol?

House battle over controversial student painting spirals out of control

A young Missouri student’s painting of civil unrest has sparked a proxy battle among lawmakers in the halls of the U.S. Capitol, between black Democrats concerned about what they call a legacy of unjust policing and several white Republicans who are defending law enforcement.

The tiff spiraled out of control Tuesday, with House Republicans acting on two separate occasions to pull the artwork down from a tunnel in the Capitol complex, after it was rehung by Rep. William Lacy Clay (D-Mo.), whose young constituent painted it.

The painting, by recent high school graduate David Pulphus, depicts a scene inspired by the 2014 events in Ferguson, and other recent protests against police led by African Americans. Several figures are depicted as animals, and some pro-police activists have said the rendering evokes derogatory images of police as pigs.

It is part of a national art competition, one of 435 artworks chosen by local panels of artists to hang in the underground tunnel between the Capitol and the Cannon House Office Building.

Clay appeared in the tunnel with fellow members of the Congressional Black Caucus on Tuesday morning to rehang the painting after it had first been removed Friday by Rep. Duncan D. Hunter (R-Calif.) — who took it down, in a spokesman’s words, to “make a statement” about his support for law enforcement and delivered it to Clay’s office.

For more than two years, the national debate about the policing in African American communities has largely bypassed Capitol Hill, which has been under the control of Republican lawmakers wary of wading into the controversy. Rather, it took an 18-year-old’s painting to unleash lawmakers’ passions.

Clay and others defended Pulphus’s right to free expression, and to have his views represented on the walls of the U.S. Capitol — a building, they pointed out, that contains numerous statues of Confederate leaders and other racist historical figures.

Clay said he was “not anti-police” and said his family included many law enforcement members. But he said that Pulphus had a right to express his impression of the struggles black Americans have experienced with police.

The painting hung in the Capitol for several months without incident before a conservative website, Independent Journal Review, wrote about it, and a Fox News personality highlighted it on air in late December.

Several law enforcement groups have called for the painting’s removal, and they have gotten backing from several Republican lawmakers. Rep. Dave Reichert (R-Wash.), a former county sheriff, called it “disheartening to see this depiction of law enforcement hanging in the hallway of our nation’s Capitol” and has taken a leading role in urging House leaders to take the painting down. But it was Hunter’s decision to take matters into his own hands that has turned matters into a full-blown media spectacle.

After Clay rehung the painting Tuesday, Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-Colo.) took it down and, like Hunter, returned it to Clay’s office. Clay once again rehung the painting, but later in the afternoon, Reps. Brian Babin (R-Texas) and Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.) again removed it.

For more than two years, the national debate about the policing in African American communities has largely bypassed Capitol Hill, which has been under the control of Republican lawmakers wary of wading into the controversy. Rather, it took an 18-year-old’s painting to unleash lawmakers’ passions.

Clay and others defended Pulphus’s right to free expression, and to have his views represented on the walls of the U.S. Capitol — a building, they pointed out, that contains numerous statues of Confederate leaders and other racist historical figures.

Clay said he was “not anti-police” and said his family included many law enforcement members. But he said that Pulphus had a right to express his impression of the struggles black Americans have experienced with police.

The painting hung in the Capitol for several months without incident before a conservative website, Independent Journal Review, wrote about it, and a Fox News personality highlighted it on air in late December.

Several law enforcement groups have called for the painting’s removal, and they have gotten backing from several Republican lawmakers. Rep. Dave Reichert (R-Wash.), a former county sheriff, called it “disheartening to see this depiction of law enforcement hanging in the hallway of our nation’s Capitol” and has taken a leading role in urging House leaders to take the painting down. But it was Hunter’s decision to take matters into his own hands that has turned matters into a full-blown media spectacle.

After Clay rehung the painting Tuesday, Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-Colo.) took it down and, like Hunter, returned it to Clay’s office. Clay once again rehung the painting, but later in the afternoon, Reps. Brian Babin (R-Texas) and Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.) again removed it.

Silent through all of this has been House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.), who said at a news conference last week that he was not familiar with the painting. A spokeswoman did not respond to a request for comment on whether Ryan considered it appropriate for members to personally remove works of art from the Capitol walls.

Reichert is planning to move through official channels to have the painting removed, petitioning the Architect of the Capitol in a forthcoming letter that cites rules of the yearly Congressional Art Competition. They stipulate that “exhibits depicting subjects of contemporary political controversy or a sensationalistic or gruesome nature are not allowed.”

Clay said Pulphus’s painting, in his view, comported with those rules: “The African American community has had a painful, tortured history with law enforcement in this country,” he said. “That’s not contemporary, that’s historic.”

Notably, another winner of the competition — by a Georgia teen — depicts two white police officers of another era harassing a black person playing checkers. Another piece, by an Arizona teen, has an undeniably contemporary subject: It’s a portrait of Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.).

Clay said he was open to an independent review but not to individual members taking matters into their own hands: “If there’s a process to remove this painting, well, let’s start the process and let’s discuss it. But you just don’t walk up here and remove a painting because you are offended by it.”

 
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Posted by on January 11, 2017 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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One More Thing For the CBC

Image result for black marine

If the CBC is serious about opposing the Chumph – then I have one more suggestion – Play the Lee Atwater Republican game against them.

Pass a Law which allows anyone convicted of a minor drug or other crime to have the choice of joining the military for 4 years, or going to prison to serve their sentence. Make it applicable at the State and Federal Court level, which I think you can do because of a tweak in the law concerning the Military. Should such such prisoner serve their Military term and receive an Honorable Discharge then the should receive all the benefits accrued by their service, as well as a full restoral of any Voting Rights they may have lost, both while doing their service, and after. Their criminal record should be expunged.

Should the commit a crime while serving, then they are subject to any Military Justice that applies and penalties, as well as after serving those penalties, the will have to serve whatever time they were original sentenced to minus time thy have served in the active Military.

Politically this should be easy to defend. And very difficult for Republicans to defeat.

What it accomplishes is a couple of things which are important.

  1. It short circuits the school to jail pipeline.
  2. It kneecaps the private prison system
  3. It opens up training a job opportunities for youth
  4. The Military experience will definitely install some discipline
  5. It provides a pipeline for education where none existed before

And even better from my view in fighting the Chump Reich

  1. It increases the number of minorities in the Military, which…Prevents the Chumph from using the Military against Minorities
  2. Trains young folks in self-defense methods and how to use guns to defend their neighborhoods from Trump racist thugs
  3. It gets some of the hardheads off the street an into something productive

Now – the Rethugs are going to use every dirty trick in the book to fuck over minorities, You – the CBC, need to be their Achilles heel.

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Posted by on January 3, 2017 in Second American Revolution

 

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Will the CBC Grow a Backbone?

An organization best known for throwing the most lavish parties in Washington, DC – the Congressional Black Caucus…Has announced they are black folks “last savior” under the Chumph Reich.

Not sure how these folks are going from being completely ineffectual to actually mounting anything more than symbolic resistance for the press. But let’s assume some of these folks actually want to do something…And actually have the courage to act. Then the issue is plan of action. If they really are going to do more than whimper and wine – thwen they are going to have to figure a few things out –

  1. There is no such thing as bipartisanship
  2. “Comity” is something inadequate fools do in Congress
  3. This is a war, not only against the Chumph, but Republicans – No Justice, no Peace…Period.
  4. You are going to have to trade for some things you don’t want for some you do. State your demands clearly, and please focus on something that actually affects the lives of minorities like stronger enforcement of Civil Rights laws in finance, jobs, and housing.
  5. Nothing can be off the table, including completely shutting down Congress by any means necessary

With the basic ground rules in place, you need to use the same sort of “Moment of clarity” you used in the Gun Filibuster… Except you have to be prepared to disrupt and disable the House for at least 4 years. Nothing in…Nothing out.

My suggestion are –

  • Day 1 – start a filibuster, and don’t shut it sown until there is a rules change. What you are looking for is Minority Control over “Special Committees” to investigate. The first committee’s purpose being a full and complete investigation of the Chumph’s communication with Putin, and Russian interference with the election — including the vote.
  • Day 2 – File Articles of Impeachment, and refile them every single day until the Chumph is gone.
  • Day 3 – Do not allow the Chumph to appoint anyone to the Judiciary…Period. Until the day he is Impeached, resigns, or is carried out in a body bag – he gets nothing. Should Obama be stupid enough not to make recess appointments in the next week, do not let the Chumph so much as a Gavel to the Supreme Court.
  • Day 4 – Propose legislation stripping funding from Federal Agencies to do the “Conservative Agenda”. Shut the door on any funding.
  • Day 5 – Institute a legal examination of the Chumph’s conflicts of interest.
  • Day 6 – Start filing cases before the Supreme Court.
  • Day 7 – Force the Republicans to pass legislation with no Democrat Representatives present. If your fellow Democrats won’t support you – then you need a new Party. Leave the Democrat Party, and come up with something nice and clean for your new party name – “American Civil Rights for All Party?” Ask the other minority caucuses to join.
  • Disrupt, stall, yell, shout, scream, and utterly ignore the illegitimate Republican Party control of both houses.
  • I believe you can invite guests. Now I don’t know what the penalty is for disrupting proceedings – but I would set up a defense fund, and fill the galleries with everything from Aretha Franklin singing “Let Freedom Ring” to 40 Gang bangers off the streets of LA.
  • Having worked on the hill some years ago, I am fully aware there are only 6 spare parking spaces – have protesters block the parking garages.Make them walk.

And from where I sit, that is just the start.Disrupt, destroy, derail the process any way you can.

And until I see some version of real active resistance… You are nothing but a pack of Cabaret dolls.

Black pols plan Trump resistance

‘Our community is counting on us as the last line of defense between Donald Trump and the worst of what America could offer,’ one African-American lawmaker says.

After eight years of the nation’s first African-American president, black lawmakers were in for an adjustment no matter who won the White House.

But members of the Congressional Black Caucus say they’re bracing for the worst in Donald Trump, fearing a presidency that could set minorities back decades.

Leaders of the group told POLITICO they have already begun discussing strategies to deal with Trump and any policies they believe would disenfranchise African-Americans — from public school funding to low-income housing to voting restrictions. Though the president-elect’s supporters call the alarm unwarranted, black lawmakers say Trump’s campaign and his Cabinet picks more than justify their concern.

“The stakes are incredibly high and our community is counting on us as the last line of defense between Donald Trump and the worst of what America could offer,” Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.) said.

“This is not the normal incoming president,” added Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-Mo.). “We had no plan for George Bush. I think Charlie Rangel and John Conyers would tell you they didn’t even have a plan for Richard Nixon. But this is not the norm.”

Incoming CBC Chairman Cedric Richmond (D-La.) is expected to outline his priorities for the new administration when he officially takes the reins of the caucus on Tuesday. Some members suggested challenging Trump on his home turf — Twitter — while others advocated nonviolent protests reminiscent of the civil rights movement.

Trump has tried at times to appeal to the African-American community. He talked about “a new deal for black America” on the campaign trail and predicted his plans to revive the economy would pay big dividends for minorities.

But Trump also often showed a deep misunderstanding of the socioeconomic makeup of black America and at times touted wildly inaccurate claims about African-American poverty and employment levels. His appeal to black voters for their support — “What the hell do you have to lose?” he said at one August rally in Michigan — was offensive to many.

Trump proposed blanket policies targeting ethnic and minority groups, like banning Muslims and building a wall to keep out Mexican immigrants. And he was at the forefront of the “birther movement,” which CBC members viewed as a racially motivated attempt to delegitimize the nation’s first African-American president.

“The campaign that we saw over the last 12 months is very frightening. And there’s been no effort on his part to even temper his comments since being elected,” said outgoing CBC Chairman G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.). “It’s going to be very contentious, I suspect, if Mr. Trump even follows through on half of his promises during the campaign.”…Read the rest Here

 
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Posted by on January 2, 2017 in Second American Revolution

 

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