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“bacha bazi” Homosexuality, Pedophilia, and Slavery in the Muslim World

The term “Homosexuality” wasn’t  invented until the late 19th Century by European scholars attempting to categorize people into subsets. Much like racial theories at the time listed characteristics of each race, which had little to do with any reality, and a lot to do with racist stereotypes.

The Koran makes no specific condemnation of same sex relationships. Further, Islam is like Christianity in that there are many different sects with different belief sets. In some, neither homosexuality or pedophilia is condemned.

Taliban use ‘honey trap’ boys to kill Afghan police

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The Taliban are using child sex slaves to mount crippling insider attacks on police in southern Afghanistan, exploiting the pervasive practice of “bacha bazi” — paedophilic boy play — to infiltrate security ranks, multiple officials and survivors of such assaults told AFP.

The ancient custom is prevalent across Afghanistan, but nowhere does it seem as entrenched as in the province of Uruzgan, where “bacha bereesh” — or boys without beards — widely become objects of lustful attraction for powerful police commanders.

The Taliban over nearly two years have used them to mount a wave of Trojan Horse attacks — at least six between January and April alone — that have killed hundreds of policemen, according to security and judicial officials in the province.

“The Taliban are sending boys — beautiful boys, handsome boys — to penetrate checkpoints and kill, drug and poison policemen,” said Ghulam Sakhi Rogh Lewanai, who was Uruzgan’s police chief until he was removed in a security reshuffle in April amid worsening violence.

“They have figured out the biggest weakness of police forces — bacha bazi,” he told AFP.

The assaults, signifying abuse of children by both parties in the conflict, have left authorities rattled, with one senior provincial official who echoed Rogh Lewanai’s view saying “it’s easier tackling suicide bombers than bacha attackers”.

The killings illustrate how bacha bazi is aggravating insecurity in Uruzgan, a remote province which officials warn is teetering on the brink of collapse, unravelling hard-won gains by US, Australian and Dutch troops who fought there for years.

“These bacha attacks have fuelled deep mistrust within police ranks,” Seddiqullah, a police commander at a checkpoint near the provincial capital Tarin Kot, told AFP.

The insurgents are using boys as honey traps, said 21-year-old Matiullah, a policeman who was the only survivor from an insider attack in Dehrawud district in spring last year.

He said the attacker was the checkpoint commander’s own sex slave, a teenager called Zabihullah. Late one night, he went on a shooting spree, killing seven policemen including the commander as they slept.

“He brought the Taliban inside and poked all the bodies with rifle butts to see if anyone was alive. I pretended to be dead,” said Matiullah, who now works as a tailor, pointing out a gash on his forehead.

“As his Taliban accomplices gathered our weapons and ammunition, Zabihullah declared: ‘Everyone is dead’.”

– ‘Addiction’ to boys –

The Taliban, who banned bacha bazi during their 1996-2001 rule, roundly denied deploying any underage boys for insider attacks.

“We have a special mujahideen brigade for such operations — all grown men with beards,” a Taliban spokesman told AFP.

The insurgents have long denied using children in combat, a claim repeatedly debunked by rights groups and the government.

Survivors of insider attacks who spoke to AFP, including Matiullah, suggest the Taliban are exploiting the institutionalisation of bacha bazi in police ranks for military gain.

Practically all of Uruzgan’s 370 local and national police checkpoints have bachas — some up to four — who are illegally recruited not just for sexual companionship but also to bear arms, multiple officials said.

Some policemen, they said, demand bachas like a perk of the job, refusing to join outposts where they are not available….More Here

 

 

 
 

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Most Popular Baby Names

Interesting – you would think a Hispanic name would win out in the Southwest…Especially in New Mexico with nearly 50% Hispanic population.

Just for the fun of it…

 
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Posted by on May 26, 2016 in General

 

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Scary 5 YO Black Boys in Kindergarten

There are disparate discipline rates of black vs white children…

We know that in the 13 states which allow corporal punishment in schools, black girls bear a disproportionate level of punishment

Black Parents favor spanking as punishment

A map of states which allow corporal punishment includes all but one the states of the confederacy, and is similar to a map of the current blue-red political divide…

It starts in pre-school…

Racism in the Kindergarten Classroom

New research finds faces of five-year-old black boys put whites in a more threat-conscious state of mind.

If the current election cycle hasn’t convinced you that racism has yet to be eradicated, consider this: The mere image of a black man is enough to stimulate an automatic threat response in whites. Research has found faces of African-American males are more likely to be perceived as angry, and can trigger neural activity associated with rapid detection of danger.

While even pre-teens can stimulate this reaction (which helps explain the tragic shooting of a 12 year old holding a pellet gun in Cleveland two years ago), it presumably doesn’t apply to very young black boys. It’s hard to believe they are perceived as dangerous as they emerge from the womb.

So when do they start coming across as threatening? Newly published researchprovides a depressing answer: by the time they enter kindergarten.

Participants misidentified safe words as threatening more often after seeing a black face.

In a series of studies, a University of Iowa research team led by Andrew Todd finds images of the faces of five-year-old black boys are sufficient to trigger whites into heightened-threat mode. “Implicit biases commonly observed for black men appear to generalize even to young black boys,” the researchers write in the journal Psychological Science.

The first of their experiments featured 63 college undergraduates, who “completed a categorization task in which two images flashed on the monitor in quick succession. Participants were instructed to ignore the first time, which was always a face; it merely signaled that the second image was about to appear. Their task was to quickly and accurately categorize the second image (the target object) as a gun or a toy, by pressing one of two response keys.”

In fact, the faces—all of five-year-old boys with neutral facial expressions—were a key component of the experiment. Six of them featured black children, and six white. Researchers wanted to know whether the race of the child would affect the speed and accuracy of the white participants’ responses.

It did. “Participants identified guns more quickly after black-child primes than after white-child primes,” the researchers report, “whereas they identified toys more quickly after the white-child primes than after black-child primes.”

Subsequent experiments found black five-year-old faces produced just as strong an effect as photographs of adult black males. This held true when white participants were labeling images as guns or tools, and when they were shown a list of words (including “criminal” and “peaceful”) and asked to categorize each as “safe” or “threatening.”

In that last experiment, participants misidentified safe words as threatening more often after seeing a black face, and misidentified threatening words as safe more often after seeing a white one—child or adult.

“These racial biases were driven entirely by differences in automatic processing,” Todd and his colleagues write. In other words, no conscious thought was involved; whites simply saw a black male face and reacted in ways that indicated a heightened level of perceived threat.

Even when the face was that of a five-year-old.

 
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Posted by on February 2, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Rare Slave Photograph Found

The Civil War occurred right about the time photography became commercially available in the United States. While there a few pictures by intrepid experimenters going back to the late 1840’s, principally Daguerreotypes in Europe. The craze hit the US in the 1850’s, with the development of two other technologies to make prints, the Calotype, and the more commercially successful albumen based technology, initially the Collodion process which led to Ambrotypes and Tintypes by the time of the War. As such, it is possible to roughly date a surviving photograph by the process used. I have one Daguerreotype in my personal collection, of two men, one of which is reputed to be an ggg-uncle, and the other is my ggg-grandfather taken in the 1850’s. I don’t know which is which, nor the circumstances of why the photograph was taken – since at that time a photograph would have cost well over a weeks wages for your average worker. The other oddity is that both men are carrying rifles.

Photographs were still fairly expensive, so the subject matter tended to be people with means. Until the 1870’s when the process became common, and photographers wandered America taking pictures of everything from babies to bad guys. So it is exceedingly rare to find photographs of slaves. Apparently, in this case a slave merchant hit upon the idea of photographing slaves as a methodology to keep records…

Hat Tip – NewsOne!

Rare Slave Photograph Found In North Carolina Attic

RALEIGH, N.C. – A haunting 150-year-old photo found in a North Carolina attic shows a young black child named John, barefoot and wearing ragged clothes, perched on a barrel next to another unidentified young boy.

Art historians believe it’s an extremely rare Civil War-era photograph of children who were either slaves at the time or recently emancipated.

The photo, which may have been taken in the early 1860s, was a testament to a dark part of American history, said Will Stapp, a photographic historian and founding curator of the National Portrait Gallery’s photographs department at the Smithsonian Institution. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 11, 2010 in Black History

 

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