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High School Suspends Student For “Smelling Like Drugs”

This one is pretty sick. A black teen was suspended from High School, because a teacher though her hand smelled of Marijuana. The School is supporting the suspension even though the girl tested clean on a Drug Test, and had no drugs in her possession!

High school suspends drug-free black teen for ‘drug possession’ — after sniffing her hand

A High school in Wake County, North Carolina has suspended a student for “drug possession”—even though she did not have any drugs on her and passed a drug test.

The reason given by Garner Magnet High School for suspending 15-year-old Jakaya Johnson was that a school resource officer smelled marijuana in the hallway and followed her into a classroom. An assistant principal then determined that her hand smelled like marijuana. How these two officials acquired their expertise in the scent is unclear. Johnson subsequently took a drug test which determined that she had no drugs whatsoever in her system

Johnson has been suspended and compelled to participate in a counseling program—to counsel her, presumably, for her lack of drug use.

While the school has stuck by its arbitrary decision, it has informed Johnson and her understandably furious mother that she can appeal the suspension through an incredibly complex process which places the burden of proof on her, even though she has already proved her innocence.

Like most other manifestations of bad drug policy, people of color are disproportionately affected by school suspensions and expulsions.

 
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Posted by on May 11, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Another Whitewash Jury in San Jose

I could debate about the punishment that would be appropriate for the miscreants – and whether locking them up, or giving them some serious community service time would be more effective. I think about 30 days in jail, followed by 4-6 months of working community service in a poor section of town might do wonders.

Donald Williams Jr., center, walks with his parents, Nancy and Donald Williams, out of Santa Clara Superior Court on Monday morning, Feb. 1, 2016, in San Jose, Calif.

All white jury fails to convict white San Jose State students who abused black classmate of hate crimes

Donald Williams Jr.’s parents were shocked to find a the Confederate flag posted in the common room of their son’s dorm. It was accompanied by a white board that featured the N-word and a swastika. But that wasn’t the worst of what Williams endured as a freshman at San Jose State University.

In September of 2013, one of his seven white roommates came up behind him and placed a U-shaped bike lock around his neck. Williams struggled to be released for five minutes before his roommate finally gave him the key. A week later, three of his other roommates attempted to do the same thing but failed when Williams engaged in a scuffle.

There was also an incident when Williams, who is reportedly claustrophobic, was locked inside a closet. His roommates assigned him nicknames such as “three-fifths” and “fraction,” which referenced how the Constitution once counted black slaves.

Despite the racially charged and abusive behavior, which were pieced together by police statements and an independent investigation, an all white jury deadlocked on the hate crime charges and ultimately failed to convict the suspects. Instead, Colin Warren, Logan Beaschler and Joseph “Brett” Bomgardner were found guilty ofmisdemeanor battery after “offensively touching” Williams during the bike-lock prank, the San Jose Mercury News reported.

Sentencing is set for March, and the students face a maximum of six months in jail. According to the Washington Post, they’re unlikely to serve any time due to the absence of a hate crime conviction. They’re likely to get off easy with community service instead.

Ultimately the jury believed that the actions taken by the students were just pranks that went too far as opposed to hate crimes. But the fact that the students forcefully put a bike lock around Williams’ neck and didn’t deal with felony assault charges is ludicrous.

The Santa Clara County District Attorney Jeff Rosen disagrees that what Williams went through was nothing more than pranks, and is considering pursuing a retrial.

“Prejudice is not a prank,” Rosen said. “This violence did not happen in a historical vacuum. This violent act was done to a young black college student by five white men, an injustice inflicted upon him because of the color of his skin.”

Often times when debates about white privilege come about, white individuals believe it’s a denial of their own struggles and the hard work they put into their success. But white privilege is simply getting the benefit of the doubt by those in authority and the community.

The jury in the Williams case decided to give the white students the benefit of the doubt by believing that their actions were simply meant to be pranks and nothing more. But if the tables were turned and the races were reversed, does anyone actually think that black students would get the same treatment? Anyone who says “yes” is either incredibly naive or in denial.

 
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Posted by on February 28, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Black Contribution to Gun Threats on Campus

As MLK said, Hate fosters Hate…

University Of Chicago Shooting Threat A Response To Laquan McDonald Video

Jabari R. Dean, 21, of Chicago, threatened to kill 16 white male students or staff at the school.

Federal authorities said an online threat that led the University of Chicago to cancel classes Monday targeted whites and was motivated by the police shooting of a black teenager, video of which was released last week and sparked protests.

Jabari R. Dean, 21, of Chicago, threatened to kill 16 white male students or staff at the school on Chicago’s South Side, according to the criminal complaint.

Dean, who is black, was arrested Monday morning. He did not enter a plea later in the day on a charge of transmitting a threat in interstate commerce in court. Dean is a freshman studying electrical engineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and wore a red sweat shirt emblazoned with the name of that school at the hearing.

The threat was posted Saturday, just days after the city released a video of Officer Jason Van Dyke, who is white, shooting 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, who was black, 16 times.

Van Dyke is charged with first-degree murder, and his bond was set for $1.5 million on Monday. That means Van Dyke needs to pay $150,000 to be released, and Van Dyke’s attorney said he was hopeful his client could be released in the “very near future.”

Authorities said Dean posted online from a phone that he would “execute approximately … 16 white male students and or staff, which is the same number of time (sic) McDonald was killed” and “will die killing any number of white policemen that I can in the process.”

The criminal complaint, released by the U.S. attorney’s office in Chicago, said someone tipped the FBI on Sunday to a threat that was posted on a social media website. The FBI was unable to find the threat online, and was provided a screenshot by the person who reported the threat.

That led them to Dean, who admitted to FBI agents that he posted the threat and took it down shortly after posting it, the complaint said. Despite the threat mentioning three guns, a prosecutor said Monday that Dean did not appear to pose a threat. The complaint did not say whether Dean possessed any weapons.

The University of Chicago, where President Barack Obama taught law, first alerted students and staff Sunday night about a threat that mentioned the quad, a popular gathering place, and 10 a.m. Monday.

The University of Chicago statement urged faculty, students and non-essential staff to stay away from the Hyde Park campus through midnight Monday and told students in college housing to stay indoors. The cancellations of classes and activities affected more than 30,000 people, though the University of Chicago Medical Center was open to patients.

Not sure what Mr Dean thought he was accomplishing in threatening an attack on 16 innocent fellow students. Seems to me his anger and targets (not to mention violent response) are misplaced – anger at the innocent symptom of the problem instead of it’s cause and support structure.

Hate also makes you stupid.

 
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Posted by on December 1, 2015 in BlackLivesMatter, Domestic terrorism

 

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Martise Johnson, Student Beaten By Police at UVa, Speaks Out

A lot of folks in y area with ties to the University of Virginia, were shocked this spring by the video of Police assaulting a kid in front of one of the campus bars. Martise was asked for an ID at the entrance to one of the bars, and after presenting a valid state ID was slammed to the ground by officers and arrested.

After being detained, all charges were dropped.

Martese Johnson, the U.Va. Student Assaulted by Officers Last Spring, Speaks Out

On the night of March 18, 2015, three white Alcoholic Beverage Control officers asked me for identification outside of a bar adjacent to the University of Virginia’s grounds. I showed them my I.D., which they wrongly assumed was a fake I.D. After a brief interaction with these officers, I was slammed to the ground violently, detained with handcuffs and leg shackles, and arrested without justification. As the officers pinned me to the ground with their knees, blood flowed freely from my face and my friends and classmates surrounded the scene, screaming with indignation and anger. They watched helplessly as I yelled, “How did this happen? I go to U.Va.!” When I was picked up and dragged away by these officers, glimpses of my ancestors’ history flashed before my eyes. Although it could never compare to a life of slavery, for those hours, I had no freedom, no autonomy, and no say in what was happening to me. I cried for a long time that night—not because of my physical wounds (though there were many) or possible jail time (I was charged with two misdemeanors that were eventually dropped), but because my lifelong vision of sanctuary in success was destroyed in seconds.

The next morning, a video of my encounter with law enforcement went viral, and #JusticeForMartese became a nationally trending hashtag. Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, Rekia Boyd, Michael Brown, Ezell Ford, Tanisha Anderson, Eric Garner, John Crawford, Freddie Gray, Sandra Bland, Samuel DuBose. My name is now mentioned alongside theirs. These victims’ hashtags will probably exist forever, signifying a new historic era of social-media activism.

Most of those famous hashtags came at the cost of a precious human life. I am lucky to say this was not the case for me, but the list will continue to grow. According to The Guardian,as of the time of this writing, 880 people have died at the hands of “police and other law enforcement agencies in the United States” since the start of 2015. Of those 880 killings, 217 of the victims were black. Making up about 25 percent of deaths by law enforcement, African-American lives are lost at a higher rate than any other racial demographic in the United States.

I sustained three gashes on my head (one requiring 10 stitches to close), facial swelling, a busted lip, and cuts and bruises on my body. The scars on my face and head will likely remain for the rest of my life. The officers’ actions may not have been premeditated that night, but I do believe they were calculated. Thousands of students have been arrested for similar charges throughout the years, 1,670 by A.B.C. officers just last year, but it’s hard to imagine that most of them experienced the physical violence I endured in that brief period. Why would I be subjected to such violence when so many other students in similar circumstances—so many other students that same night—were left alone? With the untold thousands of college students in Charlottesville that night, it is difficult to believe that my race did not play a factor in the way I was handled by the officers. The United States’ policing issues are incomparable to any country in the rest of the world. The Guardianshares that “in the first 24 days of 2015, police in the U.S. fatally shot more people than police did in England and Wales, combined, over the past 24 years.” The truth of the matter is that police forces in America are over-militarized.

During my childhood in the South Side of Chicago, I believed that education and success would become my sanctuary. I grew up in some of the most violent and under-resourced neighborhoods in what is often called the “murder capital” of the United States. I have seven brothers; my mother raised three of us on her own. We struggled for what we had. No family car, no vacations, no weekend outings. We seldom celebrated holidays, because we could not afford that privilege. When my brothers and I complained about materialistic things like new clothes, we were reminded that we had a place to sleep and groceries were usually in the refrigerator. By necessity, we learned to appreciate what many children in this country take for granted: food and shelter. Despite these hardships, my mother emphasized the importance of good health and togetherness within our family; she created a household environment where instead of feeling limited or disadvantaged, I felt emotionally supported and loved.

My mom did a great job taking care of us, but it was the constant financial struggle that motivated me to carve out a new life for myself and eventually my family. I was often told that if I just did what I was “supposed to do” (pull up my pants, go to school, and stay out of trouble), I would one day earn a better life. Most of the young people in my community wanted better lives, too, but could not endure the poverty while following the rules of a society that had written them off at birth. We give more funding to prisons than schools, provide easier access to crippling debt than opportunity, and only offer jobs to poor communities that almost ensure mere subsistence over success. Many of my peers fell into the inescapable trap that is the U.S. prison system. I heeded the advice given to me by my elders, and was lucky enough to be among the fraction that escaped my neighborhood.

On March 18, 2015, what I had thought of as my long-worked-for sanctuary crumbled. Three A.B.C. officers did what they interpreted as their duty. They hailed from an agency whose mission consists of “protecting citizens by ensuring a safe orderly and regulated system,” but those officers’ definition of “citizens” does not include people who look like me. These officers would probably never admit to being racist, and it is because they truly believe that they are not. Still, their inclination to police a black male more violently than a white male conveys a different message. The officers did not see a University of Virginia student out with his peers; they saw a young black male with a high-top fade, a gold chain, some tennis shoes, and a hoodie. In their minds, I could not possibly have been a member of the “community” that they had sworn to protect.

Growing up in Chicago, I know firsthand how law-enforcement officers treat black people and members of low-income neighborhoods. Exclaiming my enrollment at a university that has never fully embraced minorities like me seemed, ironically, to be my last resort of claiming the sanctuary that I thought I had built. After years of working hard to change my life for the better, I realized that there were some things that would always be the same. There are no suits I can wear, words I can say, or achievements I can earn that will eliminate the centuries of fear and propaganda that have told this nation and the world that people who look like me are inherently a threat.

In the social-media tidal waves of police brutality, my story picked up traction. I was a University of Virginia student. I was “honorable.” I was supposed to be “one of the good ones.” And so my story had a plot twist. The media didn’t paint me as a weed-smoking kid with an attitude, like they were able to do posthumously to Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown. The media didn’t refer to a previous arrest record, as they did in Freddie Gray’s murder. The narrative of a smart, black, politically active University of Virginia student being brutalized by A.B.C. officers directly contrasts the story often woven to validate black lives being taken by law enforcement. My story combats this victim blaming, and that is why it outraged so many people.

Raw Story reported that “more black Americans were killed by police in 2014 than were killed in the World Trade Center attacks of September 11, 2001.” Trends indicate that this statistic will also be true for 2015. We are experiencing a new age of genocide, aimed at the destruction of black bodies. Our ambivalence coupled with inclinations to negatively judge has allowed us to accept police brutality in America. The men and women who have committed themselves to protecting and serving our citizens have allowed cultural biases to cloud their judgment and transform them into the very “criminals” they are tasked with pursuing. It has been too long, and we have lost too many lives to these crimes.…Read the rest here…

 

 
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Posted by on October 14, 2015 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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