RSS

Tag Archives: black church

Trump Racists Arson of Black Church

The picture tells you all you need to know…

Back to the KKK days when the Klan burned black churches and homes to prevent black people from voting.

This isn’t “vandalism” it is a hate crime.

The Hopewell M.B. Church, which was burned and vandalized with a pro-Trump slogan (Source: Angie Quezada, Delta Daily News)

Vandals torch black church in Mississippi — and spray paint ‘VOTE TRUMP’ on the side

Vandals in Greenville, Miss. set fire to a black church on Tuesday evening — and then spray painted a pro-Trump message on the side.

Local news station WLBT reports that the Greenville Fire Department received word of a fire at the Hopewell M.B. Church, a local black church. When they arrived on the scene, they not only found the church burning, but also found the words “Vote Trump” spray painted on the outside of it.

The station also reports that “Mayor Errick D. Simmons, Greenville Fire Chief, Washington County Sheriff and other local state and federal law enforcement agencies are holding a press conference” about the vandalism today at at 10:30 a.m. ET.

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

“Don’t Bring That Mess Here!” Black Pastor at Flint Church Corrects Trump

“Don’t bring that mess here in our house!” The Chumph gets a lesson in black etiquette …

Pastor Chides Donald Trump For Electioneering At Her Church

“I invited you here to thank us for what we’ve done in Flint, not to give a political speech.”

The pastor of a black church interrupted Donald Trump’s remarks in Flint, Michigan, on Wednesday as the Republican presidential nominee began to attack his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton.

“Mr. Trump, I invited you here to thank us for what we’ve done in Flint, not to give a political speech,” the Rev. Faith Green Timmons told Trump as she approached the businessman.

Trump turned to the pastor and immediately changed course. “Oh, oh, oh, OK, that’s good. Then I’m going to back on Flint. OK,” he said, before addressing the community once more.

Trump spoke in front of about 50 Flint residents at Bethel United Methodist Church, which has distributed aid and water to the community during the lead crisis that started in 2014. The GOP nominee praised residents for their response to the crisis, before launching into an attack against Clinton and her support for trade agreements such as NAFTA. Earlier in the day, he toured the city’s water treatment plant.

IRS regulations bar tax-exempt churches like the one Trump spoke at from participating in electioneering. Timmons released a statement prior to Trump’s visit, clarifying that his presence at the church “in no way represents an endorsement of his candidacy.”

“What we pray is that it conveys a final example of a faithful, intelligent, historically African-American congregation at work, serving and volunteering among the people of Flint as we work through this crisis of national impact. We cannot let this story drift from national attention for any reason,” she added.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on September 15, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter, Chumph Butt Kicking

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

About that Black Church the Chumph Spoke At

Here is a crow view of The Chumph’s Speech…

LOts and lots of…crickets…

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 3, 2016 in The Clown Bus

 

Tags: , , , ,

A Tale of Two Detroits – Trumps Speech at a Black Church

First – in fairness Trump’s speech at a black church in Detroit. Kudos to the Church Members for giving a warm, respectful black American welcome.

“As his remarks ended, church leaders then placed a Jewish prayer shawl upon Trump’s shoulders,” the Detroit Free Press reports.

And BTW – there was a Taco Truck parked outside the Church…

Doing a Box Office business.

Taco Truck Owner Racks Up Sales At Trump Event In Detroit

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 3, 2016 in The Clown Bus, The Post-Racial Life

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

The Black Church Is No Longer the Center of the Civil Rights Movement

A bit of “separation anxiety”?

No folks under 40…A problem for the Church

Black Activism, Unchurched

A new generation of young leaders in Baltimore are largely organizing outside of congregations. What does this mean for their movement—and for the church?

Where is the church in the Black Lives Matter movement?

The spirit of the black church has long animated the movements for civil rights and social justice in America. The call and response, the vocabulary of oppression and solidarity: These are the languages of sanctuaries and pews, of Sunday morning worship and Bible-study vigils.

But in the black- and youth-led political activism of the last several years, the church hasn’t been nearly as visible as it was in the civil-rights movement of the 1960s. After many decades in which the most prominent black activists were ministers, religious leaders seem to be playing supporting roles in the most recent wave of activism.

In Baltimore, this is particularly stark. Nearly a year ago, the city saw widespread riots and political outcry after the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old man who died of spinal injuries while in the custody of police. The long vibrant local activist community caught national attention, including a widely shared moment in the conflict when community leaders stood shoulder-to-shoulder with gang members in a northwest Baltimore church. In an earlier generation, Baltimore’s churches might have been the primary staging grounds for organizing protests and political action. Increasingly, though, the church is more of a backdrop.

In a 1976 interview, Enolia McMillan, the Baltimore NAACP president who would later become the first female head of the organization, observed that its “most dependable support … comes from the churches in Baltimore.”

“The main resources were bodies,” said Derek Musgrove, an associate professor of history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. “The church was the organizational center of the community. You were guaranteed to see a certain number of people every Sunday, and a lot of those people were going to be participating in church activities throughout the week. You could get access to them.”

These days, there are fewer young black bodies in church pews. Although black 18-to-29-year-olds tend to identify as religious more than their white, Hispanic, and Asian peers, slightly less than a third don’t see themselves as part of any particular faith, according to the Public Religion Research Institute. They’re much less affiliated than their older black peers who are under 50, roughly a fifth of whom identify with no particular religion, and significantly less than those over 50, only a tenth of whom don’t have a religion.

Just as young black activists aren’t necessarily in the church, church leaders aren’t necessarily in the streets. During the protests following Freddie Gray’s death while in the custody of city police nearly year ago, pastors led drives to distribute food and water and efforts to open churches as safe spaces. Clergymen spoke at Freddie Gray’s funeral; a local megachurch pastor, Jamal Bryant, declared that police had seen Gray as a threat “simply because he was man enough to look someone in authority in the eye.”

“I don’t think that people give enough credit to the church or the church’s involvement,” said Brion Gill, a 25-year-old who describes herself as a poet, organizer, and cultural curator, who is pictured above. But, she said, “the idea that it’s not abundantly clear how many churches are involved in this work speaks to the lack thereof.” There are probably as many views of the church’s role in activism, and of activism’s relationship to religion, as there are activists in Baltimore. But, as Gill observed, the fact that it’s even a question suggests that something once powerful has changed.

Even Bryant—a fairly prominent figure in national protest movements, who was arrested in Ferguson and briefly mounted a campaign for Congress in September—sees a limit to his leadership in this movement. “The difference between the Black Lives Matter movement and the civil-rights movement is that the civil-rights movement, by and large, was first out of the church. The Black Lives Matter movement, largely speaking, is not,” he said. “The church is having to readjust: How do you become a part of something you don’t lead?”…Read the Rest Here

 

 
6 Comments

Posted by on March 22, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Clueless Pastor

Rule 101 – If you stepped into a nest of Vipers… It ain’t going to be the one you can see in front of you which is going to kill your dumb ass.

When assessing the character of an individual – is seeing who that individual chooses to surround him/her self with. If all of a person’s friends are crooks, there is a better than even chance said person is also a crook. If most of the people a guy chooses to surround himself with are reading Mein Kampf every morning with their Cheerios – there is a good chance that those sorts of people will be nominated to the thousands of positions in the government if he/she is elected. Remember George W. Bushit? “Smiling faces”…Indeed.

God don’t help stupid. One of the basic tenets of Christianity is free choice. Including punching your own one way ticket to hell.

Being pissed off because the Democrats don’t want to join your freak show Sunday mornings is not reason to kiss the Devil’s ass. Providing 35% of the vote to get them elected means they should be kissing yours – providing you did some thinking beforehand about what you ask for. Electing those “third generation fourth rate progeny and inheritors of the Civil Rights Generation” as a certain poster here is wont to say….Ain’t going to get you there.

Why some African-American evangelicals are playing the Trump card

Pastor Mark Burns recalled how he walked into his first face-to-face meeting with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in October 2015 “full of apprehension:”

“Several other African-American pastors were scheduled to come but they backed out last minute due to heat from their congregation,” said Burns, who preaches in his hometown of Easley, South Carolina, at The Harvest Praise & Worship Center. He also runs a Christian TV network he founded four years ago – the NOW Television Network -with the help of his wife and six children. “I was not for Mr. Trump at the time, [but] I really wanted to hear the man’s heart.”Although he ended up one of the few African-American evangelical leaders in attendance at what was supposed to be a private meeting of “who’s who of Christian TV evangelicals,” Burns said the discussion was nonetheless dominated by concerns about Trump connecting with African-American voters through the African-American church.

“For those of us who are evangelical leaders and pastors, we are led by listening to the spirit of an individual, and we also believe that through the Holy Spirit, [it] will reveal to us whether someone is truthful or not,” said Burns. “All of us, especially after that first meeting, and especially us in the African-American evangelical community, [we] came out believing that this person is legit.”

Many supporters are convinced that his consistent popularity (in New Hampshirehe garnered 35 percent of Republican votes, with runner-up Ohio. Gov. John Kasich at 16 percent) will carry him to another victory in South Carolina’s upcoming primary. As the billionaire’s campaign fights in earnest for the evangelical vote, national polls place him solidly in the lead. Yet the issue of race will loom large, particularly in a general election: 72 percent of black Protestant churchgoers identify as evangelical or born-again, yet 82 percent of black Protestants – like blacks more generally – lean Democratic compared with just 11 percent who align with the Republican Party.

“As an African-American, I’m absolutely put on the defensive for being a Donald Trump supporter,” Burns told CBS News the morning of Trump’s first South Carolina rally after New Hampshire. He was getting ready for the drive to Clemson University where he was scheduled to speak at a Trump campaign event. He described how he sees it as his “calling,” and the calling of other African-American evangelicals, to turn black voters on to Trump.

“One of reasons why I believe I’ve been called to do this – to bring right where there is wrong [is that] I know that he is not at all how many African-Americans view him.”

Burns’ congregation is divided on the Trump issue. While some members, including African-Americans, echo their pastor’s praise, others maintain that Trump is a “bully” and are critical of his lack of political experience or correctness.

“It’s unprofessional,”said Danielle Sloane, a 38-year-old member of Burns’ Harvest Praise & Worship Center congregation, describing the real-estate magnate’s conduct and persona. “He is not a man of the people. He never has to worry about losing a job or his son being shot by police.”

Burns joked how, although he had yet to convince all members of his church, he believed that people simply needed to “look at the facts” and read about Trump’s policies to make the right decision: “It’s an uphill battle, but we have influenced thousands of others to take a second look, and make decisions not off of feelings.”

Burns has met with Trump several times over the past few months, and publicly endorsed him last November. Around that time, an open letter from more than 100 black religious leaders and scholars on Ebony.com, addressed “to the African-American ministers scheduled to meet with Donald Trump,” expressed disdain for their decision to back him, stating that Trump’s rhetoric was routinely racist and divisive. A November Public Policy Polling survey found that 75 percent of African-Americans had an unfavorable opinion on Trump, versus 9 percent with favorable views.

“Personally, it was a challenge at first – to be called an Uncle Tom … as if I’m submitting myself to the white man’s authority,” said Burns. “But eventually I understood somebody has to do it.

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Highway to Hell

The ego of this minister is larger than believable. First asking his congregation to buy him a $68 million jet…

And now a highway.

The home Creflo’s parishioners paid for with plenty of parking for his several Rolls Royces.

Moneybags Pastor Creflo Dollar Might Get His Very Own Highway

Controversial megachurch pastor Creflo Dollar may soon have a namesake highway to coast down in his two Rolls-Royces.

It isn’t exactly a street paved with gold and, alas, it doesn’t include any pearly gates, but controversial mega-church pastor Creflo Dollar might be getting his own highway.

A Georgia state senator filed a resolution to rename a portion of Old National Highway in Dollar’s honor.

“It is abundantly fitting and proper that this enduring example of God’s message be recognized by dedicating a road in his honor,” state Sen. Donzella James (D-Atlanta), who appears to have nothing better to do, wrote in her proposed legislation. Last year, James successfully lobbied the legislature to change the name of a section of Spring Street to Gladys Knight Highway.

At least one Atlanta blogger is calling foul.

“There are many, many God-fearing Christians of every denomination who believe [Dollar’s] message is sinful at best, exploitative at worst, and want as much distance between their government and this man as possible,” wrote George Chidi forGeorgiaPol.com.

World Changers Church International, where Dollar is the founding senior pastor, sits in James’s south Fulton County district just outside of Atlanta. Its 8,500-seat World Dome is purportedly home to around 30,000 members, many of whom are pressed to “tithe” 10 percent of their gross earnings to support the ministry. At one point, in 2006, the praying enterprise took in nearly $70 million in cash collections.

While Dollar—who is often derisively called “Rev. Cash-Flow”—has never disclosed his income, he has been widely criticized for enriching himself on the backs of his working-poor and middle-class congregation. The sanctuary, built for $18 million without bank financing, stands in a predominantly black, economically depressed neighborhood. Meanwhile, Dollar owns two Rolls-Royces and flies around the world in a private jet. He made headlines last year when the church attempted to raise $65 million for a brand new luxury Gulfstream.

Dollar “renounced” his church salary in a 2007 interview with The Associated Press and said he relies on personal investments, including income from book sales. A U.S. Senate committee investigated Dollar, along with Bishop Eddie Long of New Birth Baptist Church and four other faith leaders, but ultimately found no wrongdoing.

“Some people hear the name Creflo Dollar, and immediately sing his praises,” Andre Walker blogged at Georgia Unfiltered.

“Others hear the name Creflo Dollar, and think he’s a two-bit shyster who uses the Bible and poor religious people to support his lavish lifestyle through the so-called prosperity gospel.”

Dollar, who faced allegations that he punched and choked his daughter in June 2012, hasn’t said a word about James’s proposal. According to police reports, the pastor “slapped” his 15-year-old daughter in the face and “choked her for about five seconds.” Another of Dollar’s daughters, who was 19 at the time, allegedly witnessed the attack. In the heat of the accusations, the preacher denied that the altercation unfolded as his daughters reported and issued a public statement, saying he would never hurt them. His supporters pointed to a father’s “duty” to discipline his children….

 
3 Comments

Posted by on January 31, 2016 in American Greed, Great American Rip-Off

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

A Long History of Attacks on the Black Church

This one from Vox News, explaining the history of attacks on the Black Church as a mechanism of suppression…

3 Black Churches burnt in North Carolina, Georgia and S.Carolina in the past 5 days.

In Charlotte, N.C., authorities say a June 24 fire at Briar Creek Baptist Church was the result of arson and is being investigated as a possible hate crime. NBC News reported that more than 75 firefighters were needed to extinguish the three-alarm fire, and an hour passed before the blaze was under control. Two firefighters received medical treatment for heat-related injuries. The church sustained $250,000 in damage, including a collapsed ceiling and significant damage to a space used for a children’s summer camp. The sanctuary was spared, sustaining smoke damage along with the gymnasium.

A June 23 fire at God’s Power Church of Christ, a predominantly Black church in Macon, Ga., has been ruled as arson, although there is no indication it was a hate crime. As was reported in the Macon Telegraph, the front doors of the church were locked and wired shut when authorities arrived, but a side door was unlocked. The Federal Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco Firearms and Explosives was called, as is the case with church fires, and authorities also noted that electronics and other air conditioning equipment had been stolen from the church in two burglaries. A $10,000 reward is available through the Georgia Arson Hotline for information leading to the arrest of an arsonist.

Macon-Bibb County fire Sergeant Ben Glea­ton told the newspaper that while the investigation into Tuesday’s fire at the God’s Power Church of Christ continues, enough evidence had been discovered to rule the blaze had been deliberately set.

The arson ruling came a day after North Carolina authorities said a predominantly black church in Charlotte was purposefully burned, and roughly a week after a white gunman opened fire in an African-American church in Charleston, South Carolina, killing nine people.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 27, 2015 in Black History

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

What role for the Black Church?

Historically the Black Church has been instrumental in advocating and advancing Civil Rights, and was central to organizing the protests and coalescing the voice of black people into actionable agendas.

MLK speaking before Ebenezer Baptist’s Congregation

The question today is, with the fundamental changes within the Black Church, is it possible anymore that the Church may regain it’s mantle as a central platform for the battle for Civil Rights?

Arguing against that is the reality that the Black Church in many places isn’t fully tied to it’s geographic community. As black folks have moved out of Urban areas to the burbs, the communities they have left behind, largely become “Commuter Communities”. Ergo, the expats drive to the old black community for services, whether it is a barbershop or beauty salon, or still maintain an allegiance to the old Church. They likely maintain friendships, or have relatives living in the old community. However, the issues with being black in America’s suburbs, and in the inner city are likely to be quite different.

Second is the fractionation of the community by the very Church which should be bringing it back together. Male participation in the Black Church has dropped to historic lows. Part of that has to do with personality cultism on the part of some male Preachers, part has to do with the belief the church really isn’t interested in the problems of black males, whether that perception is fair or not. An interesting analysis was published last year in the Atlanta Black Star – 6 Reasons Young Black People Are Leaving The Church.

Summed by Tony Carter who serves as the Lead Pastor of East Point Church in East Point, Georgia.The article suggest the rise in economic opportunities and social progress is making the church irrelevant. Secondly, in an ever-changing digital age, the church appears stagnant, old fashioned, and unattractive. Thirdly, today’s educated black man and woman have less use for faith in an enlightened age where reason and science answer most of their questions. Fourthly, there is a growing discontent among this generation of blacks with biblical passages that seemingly tolerate or advocate for such social ills as slavery and genocide. Fifthly, the church comes off as intolerant, judgmental, and simplistic when it comes to issues of sexual activity, sexual orientation, and living holy in a sexually free society. Lastly, the article suggested that this generation seeks authenticity whereas the black church today gives the impression that everyone has it all together. In other words, black millennials want to stop pretending.

I believe there is another reason. Far too many black churches have adopted a policy of exclusionism, requiring their parishioners to marry or date only people who believe as they do. That just isn’t a formula for long term success. -especially in a society where only about 42% of black women will ever marry.

Black Churches Led The Civil Rights Movement. Can They Do It Again In Baltimore?

…Many of today’s black pastors, some young activists argue, have moved away from the black church’s traditional role as a center for African-American mobilization. “Today, what we see is churches being appendages of the kind of status-quo body politic,” said Dayvon Love, 28, director of public policy at the Baltimore think tank and activist group Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle. “This has happened generally post-integration, post-civil rights. You have cadres of individual back people who get positioned in white-dominated institutions, and their presence is used as a way to deflect from structural change.”

It sounds like a radical critique, but senior clergy have similar concerns. “If you are a church that’s never in ‘good’ trouble with the powers, then you’re probably in bed with the powers,” the Rev. Raphael Warnock, who holds Martin Luther King Jr.’s former pulpit at Atlanta’s Ebenezer Baptist Church,told NPR recently. “We’re doing precious little to actually dismantle the American prison-industrial complex, which is the new Jim Crow.”

To be sure, the protest tradition is alive and kicking in some Baltimore churches. Just last month, the Rev. Jamal Bryant, pastor of Empowerment Temple, led a group that briefly shut down a major highway into the city during the morning rush hour to denounce plans for a new juvenile jail.

And the Rev. Ron Owens, a former pastor who organized the Freddie Gray funeral, bristles at the notion that local clergy have been co-opted by the powers that be.

The same group of pastors who led the funeral and the march through the riot were instrumental in getting the U.S. Department of Justice to launch a full-blown investigation of Baltimore police, Owens said. In the week after the riot, Owens said, the group requested meetings with Justice Department officials and held separate sessions with the department’s civil rights chief, Vanita Gupta, and with Attorney General Loretta Lynch.

But Owens said it’s fair to say that such action should have come sooner, and that Baltimore clergy were previously silent on the issue of policing abuses -– even though some had experienced the problem personally. Owens himself recalled a police officer pulling him over and asking why he drove such a nice car. The Freddie Gray case has served as a wake-up call, Owens said.

“I’m glad that the alarm clock has sounded,” Owens said. “I’m the first to say that we were asleep.”…

Pastors who find the critique of co-optation too radical say another charge weighs more heavily: that they have become disengaged from the communities that surround them.

The Rev. Melvin Russell is assistant pastor at Baltimore’s New Beginnings Ministries. But his day job is as a lieutenant colonel in the Baltimore Police Department, where he leads the community partnership division. “When I was coming up,” Russell said, “the churches were community churches. We’re no longer community churches. We have devolved into commuter churches.”

And gaps between congregants and neighborhoods have political consequences, said Michael Leo Owens, a political scientist at Emory University in Atlanta who has studied urban black churches. “Many of the people who we could argue are most affected by some of the problems that we see with something like, say, the Baltimore Police Department are folks that are not in the pews of these churches,” he said. “So there’s this tremendous disconnect.”

Russell previously served as commander of Baltimore’s Eastern police district, where he pushed hard for residents and community leaders -– including clergy –- to engage directly with people involved in drugs and crime. His message to the church, Russell said, was that they had failed.

“You’ve can’t have a church in a community and at the same time have an open-air drug market right outside the church,” he said. “Something’s wrong with that picture as far as I’m concerned.”

The recent spate of violence has prompted actions that Russell should like: Bryant, the pastor who led last month’s highway shutdown, has announcedthat clergy and other volunteers will patrol hot spots of violence on weekend nights this summer. Bryant also promised midnight basketball tournaments and a Father’s Day march to highlight the violence.

Meanwhile, Hickman is turning Southern Baptist Church church into a center for community redevelopment, building senior housing and other amenities for his East Baltimore neighborhood.

“Politicians and bureaucrats have ignored the church as a community stakeholder and developer and looked for others to come in and save the city,” he said. “But I believe that the church is the ideal place to start with what should happen within the community.”…(more)

In the end analysis, I believe the answer is probably not. The big reason in my mind is that the Black Community in America has changed so radically (geographically, economically, and in vision). The second is that advancing Civil Rights in this day and age involves the exercise of Political power. The simple fact is, black politicians have dropped the ball largely in knee-jerk fighting flash fires, or focusing on the wrong problems. In my view the 42 black Congressmen sitting on the Hill are probably the most useless excuses for elected officials in the country. They have been utterly co-opted. I really find it hard to believe that 20% of the elected official in Congress can’t use the parliamentary tricks commonly used by Republicans to add riders to Bills which advance the cause. If there is some sort of lucid strategy there…

I certainly don’t see it.

If you go back and do some research on how the Civil Rights movement was strategized, and planned – you will  find a group of individuals who laid out a practical strategy and executed it ruthlessly. It took a lot more than organizers or politicians showing up on the front steps of 1st Baptist mouthing their slippery/slithery support.

In the end this is why I think the grass roots organizations rising up around “Black Lives Matter” are a far more effective tool.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on June 14, 2015 in The New Jim Crow

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Black Church Joins Occupy

No surprise here. The Civil Rights Movement was about Justice, including economic justice.

African American pastors express support for Occupy movement

As the country observed Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the Rev. Jamal Harrison Bryant was outside the District headquarters of the Federal Reserve, protesting.

Instead of lingering at an MLK memorial prayer breakfast with the Rev. Al Sharpton and other icons of the civil rights movement, the Rev. Delman Coates also made his way to the protest, which included churchgoers, students and people from the Occupy Wall Streetmovement.

And rather than reminiscing about old speeches and discussing King’s legacy, the Rev. Graylan S. Hagler used his airtime on WPFW, a public radio station, to note the similarities between the Occupy movement and those who camped in “Resurrection City,” in the shadows of the Washington Monument, after King was slain.

growing number of African American pastors in the Washington area are embracing the Occupy movement. In December, leaders of Occupy D.C. left their encampments at McPherson Square and Freedom Plaza to worship at Empowerment Temple, Bryant’s church in Baltimore. Hagler has held services on Freedom Plaza. Others donate food and clothing to protesters. And Bryant, who ministers to many in the Maryland suburbs, co-founded Occupy the Dream with former NAACP leader Benjamin Chavis Muhammad.

The pastors’ pleas for economic justice sound a lot like King’s.

“This is the continuation of the [civil rights] movement. It was the economic movement that King was killed for,” said Hagler, pastor of Plymouth Congregational United Church of Christ in Northeast Washington.

Coates, pastor of Mount Ennon Baptist Church in Clinton, echoed Hagler’s sentiments.

“When Dr. King was killed, he was . . .fighting for the rights of sanitation workers,” he said. “It is critically important that we relate our faith to issues of economic justice and systemic inequality.”

Some critics say the focus of the Occupy movement, which by design does not have leaders, is unclear. But Bryant, who observed the movement from a distance before deciding he wanted to be part of it, was adamant that Occupy the Dream has a defined agenda.

“Number one, we are asking for more Pell grants so that our young people might be able to compete and go to colleges and universities,’’ he said. “Number two, we are asking for an immediate freezing on foreclosures.” The group is also seeking billions of dollars “from Wall Street for economic development and for job training.”

Beginning in February, Bryant plans to launch a campaign to urge people to pull their money out of their banks and to move it to a minority-owned financial institution.

Bryant, 40, a former national youth director for the NAACP, said his involvement in Occupy the Dream feels like a “coming home” to his civil rights roots.

“I think the Occupy Wall Street movement has held the legacy of Dr. King and has brought the church back into accountability,” Bryant said. “Dr. King would be here today. He wouldn’t be at a breakfast; he wouldn’t be at a mall. He would be here with us.”

But some pastors hesitate to throw their support behind Occupy.

The Rev. William Bennett, pastor of Good Success Christian Church and Ministries in Northeast and a founding member of the Washington Interfath Network, hasn’t joined. But, he said, “I understand what they are fighting for.”

“We have not had an economic time like this since the Great Depression, and it does call for some actions,” Bennett said. “But what I have observed . . . is that there are not clear goals and objectives. The Occupy movement does seem to be organized with a goal to create chaos. The civil rights movement was organized with a clear list of demands.”

The Rev. Joe Watkins, pastor of Evangelical Lutheran Church in Philadelphia, said churches should stick to their primary mission.

“The role of the church is to lead people to Christ and to tell them the good news and to live the good news,” Watkins said. “The young people part of the Occupy movement are just as precious as anybody. But the primary focus of the church is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ.” (more)

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 20, 2012 in Occupy America

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

The Church and Black Womens Marraige

Not really a surprise here. Early on in computer dating I found a sister who seemed to fit the bill. Attractive, intelligent, extremely well dressed, and well educated. The conversation quickly moved to the Religion part, where she announced she only dated men with the spirit in them. End of that story.

More than one of the guys here has noted the same thing. There is a huge differential between the number of black men attending, especially evangelical churches and women. Church lady may be fine, but that highly structured belief set may be a giant red stop light to a majority of the guys who might be interested. Especially if that church is decidedly hostile to those who don’t follow it’s path.

Does the black church keep black women single?

Legs covered in skin-toned stockings, her skirt crisp to the knee, Patty Davis slips on the black heels she has shined for the day.

“Got to look good in the Lord’s house,” she says as she spritzes her neck with White Diamonds perfume and exits her black Lincoln Town Car.

Davis, 46, of Union City, Georgia, has attended African Methodist Episcopal churches since before she could crawl. She sits proudly in the pew every Sunday for service and is among the first to arrive for bible study each Wednesday.

She moves swiftly, with confidence, a weathered Bible clutched in her right hand, the day’s passages dog-eared and highlighted. She’s the type of woman who can recite scriptures with ease, her love of faith evident in her speech.

“Every day is a blessed day for me,” she says. “Jesus is the No. 1 man in my life and any man who wants me must seek me through Him.”

The unmarried Georgia native is a committed follower of the Christian faith, striving to live and breathe the gospel in her daily life. Yet, according to relationship advice columnist Deborrah Cooper, it is this devout style of belief and attachment to the black church that is keeping black women like Davis — single and lonely. Read the rest of this entry »

 
14 Comments

Posted by on August 11, 2010 in American Genocide, The Post-Racial Life

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: