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Trump Racists Arson of Black Church

The picture tells you all you need to know…

Back to the KKK days when the Klan burned black churches and homes to prevent black people from voting.

This isn’t “vandalism” it is a hate crime.

The Hopewell M.B. Church, which was burned and vandalized with a pro-Trump slogan (Source: Angie Quezada, Delta Daily News)

Vandals torch black church in Mississippi — and spray paint ‘VOTE TRUMP’ on the side

Vandals in Greenville, Miss. set fire to a black church on Tuesday evening — and then spray painted a pro-Trump message on the side.

Local news station WLBT reports that the Greenville Fire Department received word of a fire at the Hopewell M.B. Church, a local black church. When they arrived on the scene, they not only found the church burning, but also found the words “Vote Trump” spray painted on the outside of it.

The station also reports that “Mayor Errick D. Simmons, Greenville Fire Chief, Washington County Sheriff and other local state and federal law enforcement agencies are holding a press conference” about the vandalism today at at 10:30 a.m. ET.

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“Don’t Bring That Mess Here!” Black Pastor at Flint Church Corrects Trump

“Don’t bring that mess here in our house!” The Chumph gets a lesson in black etiquette …

Pastor Chides Donald Trump For Electioneering At Her Church

“I invited you here to thank us for what we’ve done in Flint, not to give a political speech.”

The pastor of a black church interrupted Donald Trump’s remarks in Flint, Michigan, on Wednesday as the Republican presidential nominee began to attack his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton.

“Mr. Trump, I invited you here to thank us for what we’ve done in Flint, not to give a political speech,” the Rev. Faith Green Timmons told Trump as she approached the businessman.

Trump turned to the pastor and immediately changed course. “Oh, oh, oh, OK, that’s good. Then I’m going to back on Flint. OK,” he said, before addressing the community once more.

Trump spoke in front of about 50 Flint residents at Bethel United Methodist Church, which has distributed aid and water to the community during the lead crisis that started in 2014. The GOP nominee praised residents for their response to the crisis, before launching into an attack against Clinton and her support for trade agreements such as NAFTA. Earlier in the day, he toured the city’s water treatment plant.

IRS regulations bar tax-exempt churches like the one Trump spoke at from participating in electioneering. Timmons released a statement prior to Trump’s visit, clarifying that his presence at the church “in no way represents an endorsement of his candidacy.”

“What we pray is that it conveys a final example of a faithful, intelligent, historically African-American congregation at work, serving and volunteering among the people of Flint as we work through this crisis of national impact. We cannot let this story drift from national attention for any reason,” she added.

 
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Posted by on September 15, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter, Chumph Butt Kicking

 

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About that Black Church the Chumph Spoke At

Here is a crow view of The Chumph’s Speech…

LOts and lots of…crickets…

 
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Posted by on September 3, 2016 in The Clown Bus

 

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A Tale of Two Detroits – Trumps Speech at a Black Church

First – in fairness Trump’s speech at a black church in Detroit. Kudos to the Church Members for giving a warm, respectful black American welcome.

“As his remarks ended, church leaders then placed a Jewish prayer shawl upon Trump’s shoulders,” the Detroit Free Press reports.

And BTW – there was a Taco Truck parked outside the Church…

Doing a Box Office business.

Taco Truck Owner Racks Up Sales At Trump Event In Detroit

 
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Posted by on September 3, 2016 in The Clown Bus, The Post-Racial Life

 

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The Black Church Is No Longer the Center of the Civil Rights Movement

A bit of “separation anxiety”?

No folks under 40…A problem for the Church

Black Activism, Unchurched

A new generation of young leaders in Baltimore are largely organizing outside of congregations. What does this mean for their movement—and for the church?

Where is the church in the Black Lives Matter movement?

The spirit of the black church has long animated the movements for civil rights and social justice in America. The call and response, the vocabulary of oppression and solidarity: These are the languages of sanctuaries and pews, of Sunday morning worship and Bible-study vigils.

But in the black- and youth-led political activism of the last several years, the church hasn’t been nearly as visible as it was in the civil-rights movement of the 1960s. After many decades in which the most prominent black activists were ministers, religious leaders seem to be playing supporting roles in the most recent wave of activism.

In Baltimore, this is particularly stark. Nearly a year ago, the city saw widespread riots and political outcry after the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old man who died of spinal injuries while in the custody of police. The long vibrant local activist community caught national attention, including a widely shared moment in the conflict when community leaders stood shoulder-to-shoulder with gang members in a northwest Baltimore church. In an earlier generation, Baltimore’s churches might have been the primary staging grounds for organizing protests and political action. Increasingly, though, the church is more of a backdrop.

In a 1976 interview, Enolia McMillan, the Baltimore NAACP president who would later become the first female head of the organization, observed that its “most dependable support … comes from the churches in Baltimore.”

“The main resources were bodies,” said Derek Musgrove, an associate professor of history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. “The church was the organizational center of the community. You were guaranteed to see a certain number of people every Sunday, and a lot of those people were going to be participating in church activities throughout the week. You could get access to them.”

These days, there are fewer young black bodies in church pews. Although black 18-to-29-year-olds tend to identify as religious more than their white, Hispanic, and Asian peers, slightly less than a third don’t see themselves as part of any particular faith, according to the Public Religion Research Institute. They’re much less affiliated than their older black peers who are under 50, roughly a fifth of whom identify with no particular religion, and significantly less than those over 50, only a tenth of whom don’t have a religion.

Just as young black activists aren’t necessarily in the church, church leaders aren’t necessarily in the streets. During the protests following Freddie Gray’s death while in the custody of city police nearly year ago, pastors led drives to distribute food and water and efforts to open churches as safe spaces. Clergymen spoke at Freddie Gray’s funeral; a local megachurch pastor, Jamal Bryant, declared that police had seen Gray as a threat “simply because he was man enough to look someone in authority in the eye.”

“I don’t think that people give enough credit to the church or the church’s involvement,” said Brion Gill, a 25-year-old who describes herself as a poet, organizer, and cultural curator, who is pictured above. But, she said, “the idea that it’s not abundantly clear how many churches are involved in this work speaks to the lack thereof.” There are probably as many views of the church’s role in activism, and of activism’s relationship to religion, as there are activists in Baltimore. But, as Gill observed, the fact that it’s even a question suggests that something once powerful has changed.

Even Bryant—a fairly prominent figure in national protest movements, who was arrested in Ferguson and briefly mounted a campaign for Congress in September—sees a limit to his leadership in this movement. “The difference between the Black Lives Matter movement and the civil-rights movement is that the civil-rights movement, by and large, was first out of the church. The Black Lives Matter movement, largely speaking, is not,” he said. “The church is having to readjust: How do you become a part of something you don’t lead?”…Read the Rest Here

 

 
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Posted by on March 22, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

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Clueless Pastor

Rule 101 – If you stepped into a nest of Vipers… It ain’t going to be the one you can see in front of you which is going to kill your dumb ass.

When assessing the character of an individual – is seeing who that individual chooses to surround him/her self with. If all of a person’s friends are crooks, there is a better than even chance said person is also a crook. If most of the people a guy chooses to surround himself with are reading Mein Kampf every morning with their Cheerios – there is a good chance that those sorts of people will be nominated to the thousands of positions in the government if he/she is elected. Remember George W. Bushit? “Smiling faces”…Indeed.

God don’t help stupid. One of the basic tenets of Christianity is free choice. Including punching your own one way ticket to hell.

Being pissed off because the Democrats don’t want to join your freak show Sunday mornings is not reason to kiss the Devil’s ass. Providing 35% of the vote to get them elected means they should be kissing yours – providing you did some thinking beforehand about what you ask for. Electing those “third generation fourth rate progeny and inheritors of the Civil Rights Generation” as a certain poster here is wont to say….Ain’t going to get you there.

Why some African-American evangelicals are playing the Trump card

Pastor Mark Burns recalled how he walked into his first face-to-face meeting with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in October 2015 “full of apprehension:”

“Several other African-American pastors were scheduled to come but they backed out last minute due to heat from their congregation,” said Burns, who preaches in his hometown of Easley, South Carolina, at The Harvest Praise & Worship Center. He also runs a Christian TV network he founded four years ago – the NOW Television Network -with the help of his wife and six children. “I was not for Mr. Trump at the time, [but] I really wanted to hear the man’s heart.”Although he ended up one of the few African-American evangelical leaders in attendance at what was supposed to be a private meeting of “who’s who of Christian TV evangelicals,” Burns said the discussion was nonetheless dominated by concerns about Trump connecting with African-American voters through the African-American church.

“For those of us who are evangelical leaders and pastors, we are led by listening to the spirit of an individual, and we also believe that through the Holy Spirit, [it] will reveal to us whether someone is truthful or not,” said Burns. “All of us, especially after that first meeting, and especially us in the African-American evangelical community, [we] came out believing that this person is legit.”

Many supporters are convinced that his consistent popularity (in New Hampshirehe garnered 35 percent of Republican votes, with runner-up Ohio. Gov. John Kasich at 16 percent) will carry him to another victory in South Carolina’s upcoming primary. As the billionaire’s campaign fights in earnest for the evangelical vote, national polls place him solidly in the lead. Yet the issue of race will loom large, particularly in a general election: 72 percent of black Protestant churchgoers identify as evangelical or born-again, yet 82 percent of black Protestants – like blacks more generally – lean Democratic compared with just 11 percent who align with the Republican Party.

“As an African-American, I’m absolutely put on the defensive for being a Donald Trump supporter,” Burns told CBS News the morning of Trump’s first South Carolina rally after New Hampshire. He was getting ready for the drive to Clemson University where he was scheduled to speak at a Trump campaign event. He described how he sees it as his “calling,” and the calling of other African-American evangelicals, to turn black voters on to Trump.

“One of reasons why I believe I’ve been called to do this – to bring right where there is wrong [is that] I know that he is not at all how many African-Americans view him.”

Burns’ congregation is divided on the Trump issue. While some members, including African-Americans, echo their pastor’s praise, others maintain that Trump is a “bully” and are critical of his lack of political experience or correctness.

“It’s unprofessional,”said Danielle Sloane, a 38-year-old member of Burns’ Harvest Praise & Worship Center congregation, describing the real-estate magnate’s conduct and persona. “He is not a man of the people. He never has to worry about losing a job or his son being shot by police.”

Burns joked how, although he had yet to convince all members of his church, he believed that people simply needed to “look at the facts” and read about Trump’s policies to make the right decision: “It’s an uphill battle, but we have influenced thousands of others to take a second look, and make decisions not off of feelings.”

Burns has met with Trump several times over the past few months, and publicly endorsed him last November. Around that time, an open letter from more than 100 black religious leaders and scholars on Ebony.com, addressed “to the African-American ministers scheduled to meet with Donald Trump,” expressed disdain for their decision to back him, stating that Trump’s rhetoric was routinely racist and divisive. A November Public Policy Polling survey found that 75 percent of African-Americans had an unfavorable opinion on Trump, versus 9 percent with favorable views.

“Personally, it was a challenge at first – to be called an Uncle Tom … as if I’m submitting myself to the white man’s authority,” said Burns. “But eventually I understood somebody has to do it.

 

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Highway to Hell

The ego of this minister is larger than believable. First asking his congregation to buy him a $68 million jet…

And now a highway.

The home Creflo’s parishioners paid for with plenty of parking for his several Rolls Royces.

Moneybags Pastor Creflo Dollar Might Get His Very Own Highway

Controversial megachurch pastor Creflo Dollar may soon have a namesake highway to coast down in his two Rolls-Royces.

It isn’t exactly a street paved with gold and, alas, it doesn’t include any pearly gates, but controversial mega-church pastor Creflo Dollar might be getting his own highway.

A Georgia state senator filed a resolution to rename a portion of Old National Highway in Dollar’s honor.

“It is abundantly fitting and proper that this enduring example of God’s message be recognized by dedicating a road in his honor,” state Sen. Donzella James (D-Atlanta), who appears to have nothing better to do, wrote in her proposed legislation. Last year, James successfully lobbied the legislature to change the name of a section of Spring Street to Gladys Knight Highway.

At least one Atlanta blogger is calling foul.

“There are many, many God-fearing Christians of every denomination who believe [Dollar’s] message is sinful at best, exploitative at worst, and want as much distance between their government and this man as possible,” wrote George Chidi forGeorgiaPol.com.

World Changers Church International, where Dollar is the founding senior pastor, sits in James’s south Fulton County district just outside of Atlanta. Its 8,500-seat World Dome is purportedly home to around 30,000 members, many of whom are pressed to “tithe” 10 percent of their gross earnings to support the ministry. At one point, in 2006, the praying enterprise took in nearly $70 million in cash collections.

While Dollar—who is often derisively called “Rev. Cash-Flow”—has never disclosed his income, he has been widely criticized for enriching himself on the backs of his working-poor and middle-class congregation. The sanctuary, built for $18 million without bank financing, stands in a predominantly black, economically depressed neighborhood. Meanwhile, Dollar owns two Rolls-Royces and flies around the world in a private jet. He made headlines last year when the church attempted to raise $65 million for a brand new luxury Gulfstream.

Dollar “renounced” his church salary in a 2007 interview with The Associated Press and said he relies on personal investments, including income from book sales. A U.S. Senate committee investigated Dollar, along with Bishop Eddie Long of New Birth Baptist Church and four other faith leaders, but ultimately found no wrongdoing.

“Some people hear the name Creflo Dollar, and immediately sing his praises,” Andre Walker blogged at Georgia Unfiltered.

“Others hear the name Creflo Dollar, and think he’s a two-bit shyster who uses the Bible and poor religious people to support his lavish lifestyle through the so-called prosperity gospel.”

Dollar, who faced allegations that he punched and choked his daughter in June 2012, hasn’t said a word about James’s proposal. According to police reports, the pastor “slapped” his 15-year-old daughter in the face and “choked her for about five seconds.” Another of Dollar’s daughters, who was 19 at the time, allegedly witnessed the attack. In the heat of the accusations, the preacher denied that the altercation unfolded as his daughters reported and issued a public statement, saying he would never hurt them. His supporters pointed to a father’s “duty” to discipline his children….

 
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Posted by on January 31, 2016 in American Greed, Great American Rip-Off

 

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