RSS

Tag Archives: beauty

Outdoor Afro

Analysis of visitor data has shown that black folks are among the lest likely to enjoy our National Parks system, and to engage in outdoor activities. Getting out and doing activities is one of the most important things in terms of long term health. Doesn’t men you have to zipline Grand Canyon or scale El Capitan – but moderate hiking has great cardio benefits. Not to mention the psychic benefits of just seeing something wonderful.

One of my hobbies for years has been Landscape Photography. Backpacking gear into the wilderness to photograph the scenery, wildlife, and beauty in the mountains, desert, or coastlines. Walking through the 2000 year old Old Grove trees in the Pacific Northwest can be a religious experience, as can the silence of the Desert. Many of these places are located within a few hours drive of a city – some are so remote only a few people even get to them a year.

 

This Woman Wants To Encourage More Black People To Embrace The Outdoors

“There’s something so dynamic about a forest environment,” she said

One woman wants to inspire more black people to participate in outdoor activities, so she created a network where “black people and nature meet.”

Rue Mapp is the founder of Outdoor Afro, an organization that encourages black people to embrace the outdoors and all the activities it has to offer.

“I found that in the nature experiences I had, I was far too often the only one who looked like me,” Mapp said in a video by Facebook Stories. “So I decided to do something about it.”

The nationwide network was created in 2009 and started out as a Facebook group Mapp made to help connect black nature-lovers everywhere. The social media platform and its offerings has become a useful tool for many organizations. Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg announced Wednesday that now one billion people are using Facebook Groups every month.

“Outdoor Afro is a perfect example of how people can use Facebook groups to build relationships around the things they care about,” Alex Deve, a product manager on Facebook Groups, said in a statement to HuffPost.

Since its launch, Outdoor Afro has grown significantly and now has over a dozen chapters across the country with more than 13,000 members. According to a 2015 report released by the Outdoor Foundation, 70 percent of people who participated in outdoor activities last year were white. Only 10 percent were black.

“National park visitorship, especially in more remote areas, can be as low as 1 percent African Americans,” Mapp said. “I just felt that there were these opportunities and lessons I was learning that more people could benefit from.”

Outdoor Afro has been able to reconnect black people with nature. It encourages black people to invest more in the planet by inviting them on outings such as nature trails and teaches them important lessons on conservation. Mapp said the work she is committed to has evolved beyond her wildest dreams.

“At the end of the day, this is about love and connecting [with] one another,” she said. “Connection is strength and the chance to be better, bigger, stronger and sustainable.”

The Bioblitz Dance – Outdoor Afro and the California Conservation Corps Dance. That is Rue Mapp on the lead in.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 28, 2016 in The Post-Racial Life

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

First Houston…Now London

Four black women, upscale club in London…

No admission.

What Went Down The Night 4 Black Women Were Denied Entry At A UK Nightclub

A group of black women claim that the club denied their friends entry for being “too dark” and “overweight.”

Men and women across the United Kingdom are speaking out about a popular upscale London nightclub that allegedly denied entry to a group of four black women on Saturday night for being “too dark” and “overweight.”

Zalika Miller, 26, told The Huffington Post that a promoter for the club invited her friend Lin Mei, 29, to DSTRKT — a West End night club frequented by high-profile celebrities — for a party Saturday night. In a statement Miller provided to HuffPost on behalf of the group, Mei said that she told the promoter that she wanted to bring three friends. Mei, who is biracial, said he asked what her friends looked like. 

“He made reference to black girls, being harder to gain entry,” Mei said.  So she sent photos of her friends to the promoters.

“He said, you know, if you’re going to bring dark skin girls, they need to be extra hot so Lin basically sent in the pictures to say, look, my friends are hot, they’re pretty,” Miller said. “He saw the pictures so I guess he basically gave his approval to say ‘yea come down.'”

Miller and Mei, who said they had been the club on prior occasions, arrived early that evening along with their friends Tasha Campbell, 28, and Reshia McFarlame-Tapping, 27. Mei said they arrived on the earlier side, around 10 p.m., to ensure they would be able to get in. Instead, they were denied entry.

They allege that security told them that the table for the promoter they were in contact with was at capacity, though Mei said it was her understanding that he hadn’t arrived yet. They claim they raised the issue to the promoter when they noticed other women enter after they were denied, who told them that club staff at the entry were lying. Mei said in the statement:

“[He] then called me and stated Ugo Allessio [the manager, according to Mei] needs to see all girls so line up across the road against the wall so he can see what sort of girls they are and what they looked like. When I told the girls they were disgusted.”

Mei said after the promoter spoke with the door person to try to get them in, he told her they were denied entry because her friends were “too dark” and “overweight:”

Men and women across the United Kingdom are speaking out about a popular upscale London nightclub that allegedly denied entry to a group of four black women on Saturday night for being “too dark” and “overweight.”

Zalika Miller, 26, told The Huffington Post that a promoter for the club invited her friend Lin Mei, 29, to DSTRKT — a West End night club frequented by high-profile celebrities — for a party Saturday night. In a statement Miller provided to HuffPost on behalf of the group, Mei said that she told the promoter that she wanted to bring three friends. Mei, who is biracial, said he asked what her friends looked like. 

“He made reference to black girls, being harder to gain entry,” Mei said.  So she sent photos of her friends to the promoters.

“He said, you know, if you’re going to bring dark skin girls, they need to be extra hot so Lin basically sent in the pictures to say, look, my friends are hot, they’re pretty,” Miller said. “He saw the pictures so I guess he basically gave his approval to say ‘yea come down.'”

Miller and Mei, who said they had been the club on prior occasions, arrived early that evening along with their friends Tasha Campbell, 28, and Reshia McFarlame-Tapping, 27. Mei said they arrived on the earlier side, around 10 p.m., to ensure they would be able to get in. Instead, they were denied entry.

They allege that security told them that the table for the promoter they were in contact with was at capacity, though Mei said it was her understanding that he hadn’t arrived yet. They claim they raised the issue to the promoter when they noticed other women enter after they were denied, who told them that club staff at the entry were lying. Mei said in the statement:

“[He] then called me and stated Ugo Allessio [the manager, according to Mei] needs to see all girls so line up across the road against the wall so he can see what sort of girls they are and what they looked like. When I told the girls they were disgusted.”

Mei said after the promoter spoke with the door person to try to get them in, he told her they were denied entry because her friends were “too dark” and “overweight:”

 
2 Comments

Posted by on October 4, 2015 in The Post-Racial Life

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

“Black Don’t Crack”

International Supermodel Iman at 60 years of age…

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 25, 2015 in The Post-Racial Life

 

Tags: , , , ,

“Never Make a Pretty Woman Your Wife”…Or Apparently, a Dumb One

Wow – My first thought in reading this article was “this explains the popularity among women of those dreadful Uggs boots!”

Recall this image of Venus Williams –

Looking dumb as a beauty strategy to attract guys.

It also goes a long way to explaining conservative men walking around with tented trousers at the thought of the Sno’ Ho’ – Sarah Palin…

And the lore (and allure) of the “dumb blonde” stereotype.

Do Men Find Dumb-Looking Women More Attractive?

Ask a straight man, “How do you like your women?” and it’s unlikely he’ll answer, “Dumb and sleepy.” But according to new findings, these characteristics—and any other traits suggesting that the lady isn’t particularly alert—are precisely what the human male has evolved to look for in a one-night-stand.

In an article soon to be published in Evolution and Human Behavior, University of Texas–Austin graduate student Cari Goetz and her colleagues explored what they called the sexual exploitability hypothesis. The hypothesis is based on thedifferences between male and female reproductive strategies as humans evolved. For ancestral women, casual intercourse with an emotionally unattached man who had no clear intention of sticking around to raise any resulting offspring constituted a massive genetic gamble. By contrast, for a man with somewhere around 85 million sperm cells churned out every day—per testicle—the frivolous expenditure of gametes was far less detrimental to his genetic interests. Goetz and her team began with the assumption that—because our brains evolved long before prophylactics entered the picture—female cognition is still sensitive to the pregnancy-related consequences of uncommitted sex and women remain more reluctant than men to engage in it. They set out to test the idea that any indication that a woman’s guard is lowered—that she’s “sexually exploitable”—is a turn-on for your average man. “[T]he assessment of a woman’s immediate vulnerability,” surmise the authors, “may be central to the activation of psychological mechanisms related to sexual exploitation.”

Reminds me of an old 60’s song…

This is an inflammatory hypothesis, of course, and the language employed in the field doesn’t help matters. It’s worth noting that in the evolutionary psychology sense, the word exploitable simply means that a woman is willing or can be more easily pressured into having sex—which takes her own desires, rather disturbingly, out of the equation. Even if she’s the aggressor, a prostitute, or a certifiable nymphomaniac, having casual sex with her would still constitute “exploiting” her (or at least her body), according to this model.  Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 24, 2012 in and the Single Life

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Black and Beautiful – A History of Photography and Black Subjects

Fascinating article discussing the history of black folks being photographed. Hat Tip to Truthout!

Black people were involved in photography as early as the 1870’s in the US – sometimes as travelling photographers doing family portraits, and several beginning to explore the more serious possibilities of the medium. The first known photographs taken by a black photographer date to the late 1850’s. Recently, historical researchers in North Carolina discovered a trove of photographs of slaves from the 1850’s, some done to use in “Wanted” posters for escapees.

The pic is Four women, Atlantic City, ca. 1960s by John W. Mosley.

“Posing Beauty”: A Conversation With Author Deborah Willis

Whether expressed in the archives of the Schomburg Center in Harlem, New York, or the African-American Research Library in Atlanta, Georgia, interest in the history of the black experience in America is resurgent. Seeking to understand themselves beyond the narrative du jour of slavery and Jim Crow, some contemporary scholars and archivists are revising black history through the nuanced lenses of African-American photographers.

“I was fascinated by images I saw of my family dating back to the 1800s; of my great-grand parents down to my grandmother – fascinated by the beauty” says Duane Cramer, a noted photographer living in San Francisco who has snapped everyone from Bill Clinton to Freda Payne and Willie Brown. “I was always awestruck by the power of the imagery … my sister and I, we knew how people looked – we knew what they did, and learned how fortunate we were to have such a collection dating back so many centuries.” Pointing out the fact that most African-Americans have no such illustrated records of their own family history, Cramer says “I would always ask my mother about these pictures … who are they?”

Curator, photographer, author and scholar Deborah Willis, knows a few things about the filmed lives of African-Americans. She is the award-winning author of “Reflections in Black,” a prodigious book published in 2000, which documents the photographed lives of African-Americans by African-Americans, 1840 to the present. Willis is the chair of the photography and imaging department at the Tisch School of the Arts, and in the lead-up to the eventful 2008 presidential election, she penned the best-selling book, “Obama: The Historic Campaign in Photographs.”

Out now is her latest treatise – “Posing Beauty: African-American Images from the 1890’s to the Present,” a handsomely-boundbook published by Norton, which, she says, “explores the ways in which our contemporary understanding of beauty has been informed by photographers and artists …”

A Guggenheim and MacArthur fellow, Willis says she started out writing the book with a list of theoretical questions, some of which were: What is Beauty? Is it tangible? Does beauty matter?

Following a request through her secretary, Willis made time for a lengthy conversation; discussing some of the more unexpected aspects of what it once meant, and means now, to be black and beautiful in America.

Max Eternity: I notice that you say you don’t attempt to define beauty in your book. Still, I’d like to know: If you have one, what is your personal definition of beauty?

Deborah Willis: I don’t have one. I’m really conscious of that. I believe my response to beauty is in the experiences that people have. I’m not defining it. I’m reflecting.

Goodness is beauty. It reflects in people’s attitude, and sense of style. That’s basically how I consider and recognize beauty. I’m not defining it. I’m reflecting. (more)

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 1, 2010 in Black History, The Post-Racial Life

 

Tags: , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: