RSS

Tag Archives: arrests

Police Criminality – 3 Officers a Day are Arrested for Crimes

We know from reporting that began by Pew Research, that Police Officers commit on the average of 7-8 crimes a day, although the majority of these are minor. For the first time, a study has been done which tracks serious crimes, requiring a legal response of something beyond just administrative punishment. That study has revealed that the nation’s 765,000 Police Officers commit about 1,100 crimes a year for which they are arrested. The real number is likely an order of magnitude greater, as the likelihood of an officer being arrested by his fellow officers, or convicted by complicit local prosecutors is orders of magnitude lower than the civilian population. Many are allowed to resign, and just move to another jurisdiction. When the case does make it to the arrest stage, the actual conviction rate is higher than for the civilian population. I would suggest that is because of the hesitancy to arrest unless the case is iron clad.

policearrest2a

Study finds police officers arrested 1,100 times per year, or 3 per day, nationwide

So far this month, two New York City police commanders have been arrested on corruption allegations, an officer in Killeen, Tex., was accused of sexually assaulting a female driver, a Philadelphia police officer was charged with extortion of a drug dealer, and an officer in Hono­lulu was accused of raping a 14-year-old girl.

Such sporadic news accounts of police officers being arrested led one group of researchers to a question: How much crime do police officers commit?  No one was keeping track, much as no one was tracking how often police officers shoot and kill civilians, although both may involve use of police power and abuse of public trust.

Now there is an answer: Police officers are arrested about 1,100 times a year, or roughly three officers charged every day, according to a new national study. The most common crimes were simple assault, drunken driving and aggravated assault, and significant numbers of sex crimes were also found. About 72 percent of officers charged are convicted, more than 40 percent of the crimes are committed on duty, and nearly 95 percent of the officers charged are men.

The study is thought to be the first-ever nationwide look at police crime, and was conducted by researchers at Bowling Green State University through a grant from the Justice Department’s National Institute of Justice. The research covered seven years, 2005 to 2011, and sought to quantify not only the prevalence of police officers arrested across the country, but also how law enforcement agencies discipline officers who are arrested and how officer arrests might correlate with other forms of misconduct.policearrest1

For example, the study found that 22 percent of the officers arrested had been named as defendants in a federal civil rights lawsuit at some point in their careers, unrelated to their arrest case. The authors suggest that police agencies analyzing such suits “could potentially lead to new and improved mechanisms to identify and mitigate various forms of police misconduct.”

In the seven years of the study, the researchers compiled 6,724 cases, or about 960 cases per year, involving about 792 officers per year — 674 officers were arrested more than once. But the study has continued beyond 2011, and lead researcher Philip M. Stinson at Bowling Green said the number of cases now averages about 1,100 arrests per year.

“Police crimes are not uncommon,” Stinson concluded. “Our data directly contradicts some of the prevailing assumptions and the proposition that only a small group of rotten apples perpetrate the vast majority of police crime.” Although nearly 60 percent of the crimes “occurred when the officer was technically off-duty,” Stinson wrote, “a significant portion of these so-called off-duty crimes also lies within the context of police work and the perpetrator’s role as a police officer, including instances where off-duty officers flash a badge, an official weapon, or otherwise use their power, authority, and the respect afforded to them as a means to commit crime.”…Read the Rest Here

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 22, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Black Deaths Matter

Police overreach, brutality, and killings are just one part of black American frustration with their Police Departments. The other is the massive ineffectiveness in solving or stopping violent crime.

 

Black Deaths Matter

On the morning of March 11, 2008, shortly after the bus picked up his twin brothers for preschool, Emill Smith stopped by the house of his mother, Valerie Maxwell, in Chester, Pennsylvania. At 22, he was stocky and athletic, with dark eyes, faint facial hair, and a cursive tattoo on his right hand: “R.I.P. James,” in memory of his father, who died in his sleep when Emill was 12. They talked for a while, and he asked if he could pick the twins up from school that afternoon so they could spend time together.

That afternoon, Emill took the four-year-olds to McDonald’s and his place before dropping them off at Valerie’s: “They almost set the apartment on fire,” he joked. “Here, you can have them.” As he walked out, he stopped.

“Mom.”

“Yes?”

“I love you.”

“I love you more.”

At 7:15 p.m. that night, Valerie dialed Emill’s number to make sure he was home in time for his 7:30 curfew, part of his probation for disorderly conduct in a domestic dispute. No answer. A few minutes later, one of Emill’s friends rushed in and collapsed.

Emill had been to a neighborhood bar, where a security camera recorded him dancing, hanging out by the pool table, and kissing an old friend on the forehead before leaving. As he got into his car, someone walked up and shot him several times. No one was ever arrested in connection with the crime, and odds are no one will be. That’s because, while Chester has one of the nation’s highest homicide rates, it has a far lower than average “clearance rate.” Not even one-third of last year’s 30 homicides have been solved, a rate less than half the national average. Since 2005, 144 killings have gone unsolved.

FOR GENERATIONS, BLACK frustration with policing has been best described in a two-part statement: Cops don’t care enough to solve crimes in our neighborhoods—they just come and harass our kids. NovelistWalter Mosley even built a best-selling detective series around a tough private investigator who does all the serving and protecting that cops won’t do on the black side of town.

The bitter irony is that it was this same complaint that helped spawn the aggressive policing tactics now under attack from Ferguson to New York City. In the 1980s, when crack and heroin syndicates swept through black neighborhoods, black parents and pastors were some of the first and loudest voices to demand a war on drugs. What they got was “broken windows” policing—an emphasis on curbing petty offenses to prevent more serious crime.

What they also got were mandatory minimum sentences for shoplifters, indiscriminate stop-and-frisk sweeps, and deadly choke holds on men selling loose cigarettes. There’s little evidence that these tactics contributed much to the national decline in crime. But they did erode trust in law enforcement across many communities—leaving places like Chester increasingly bereft of the protection they badly need. With residents both fearful of police and worried about being targeted for talking to them, detectives can’t find the witnesses they need to solve crimes, breeding further distrust and a vicious cycle of frustration. A 2014 New York Daily News investigation found that in 2013, police solved about 86 percent of homicides in which the victim was white. For black victims, the number was just 45 percent. And in high-minority communities like Chester, says David Kennedy, a professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, clearance rates for murder—and even more so for nonfatal shootings—can get “pathetically low. They can easily fall down to single digits.”…Read the Rest Here

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 20, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

KKK and Counter Protesters Battle in California

Probably the worst clash between the KKK and counter-protesters since North Carolina…

KKK, counterprotesters clash in California; 5 hurt and 13 arrested

Violence broke out Saturday when Ku Klux Klan demonstrators and counterprotesters fought in Anaheim, California, leaving five people injured and 13 people arrested, authorities said.

Anaheim police spokesman Sgt. Daron Wyatt said the KKK planned a “walking protest” at Pearson Park. The counterprotesters arrived beforehand and attacked when the KKK got out of their vehicles around noon, he said.

Several fights broke out along a city block involving six KKK members — none wearing the traditional KKK robes — and 30 counterprotesters.

Three counterprotesters were stabbed — one with the decorative end of a flagstaff, one with a knife and one with an object the police did not describe, Wyatt said.

The person stabbed with the flagstaff was hospitalized in critical condition and the other two were in stable condition, police said.

Police witnessed one KKK demonstrator being stomped by by two male and a female counterprotesters. Another KKK member told police he’d been stomped and might have broken ribs, Wyatt said.

The first KKK member had minor injuries and was not hospitalized, police said, and the second one was hospitalized in stable condition.

Arrested were six male and one female counterprotesters and five male and one female KKK member, Wyatt said.

The district attorney’s office will decide what, if any, charges will be filed, he said.

Wyatt said anyone with cell phone video of the fight should contract police.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 28, 2016 in Domestic terrorism

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Modern Slavery Ring Busted in England

What is amazing is the perpetrators of this one got away with it for years despite 28 former captives coming forward to alert the authorities…

Slaves held for 15 years in kennels and horse boxes

Four men and a woman were being questioned by detectives today after 24 slaves were discovered living in dog kennels, sheds and horse boxes in one of the worst cases of modern day slavery ever discovered.

More than 200 officers swooped on the Greenacres travellers’ site in Leighton Buzzard during the early hours of yesterday morning and found the large group of men living in squalid conditions.

The raid was launched as part of a long-running investigation by Bedfordshire Police which suggested the men were being held against their will in poor conditions at the site, and forced to work for no pay. Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 12, 2011 in General

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

9 More Arrests in PG County – Including 3 Policemen

It is unclear as to whether, or how this morning’s arrest relate to the arrest of County Chairman Jack Johnson, whose wife Nicole stuffed $80,000 in her bra to hide it from the FBI…

But it appears the FBI just took another chunk of that corruption iceberg in Prince George’s County, Maryland down.

Tick Tock

3 Pr. George’s officers charged

Nine people, including three Prince George’s County police officers, were arrested Monday on charges involving drugs, guns and a large-scale scheme to distribute untaxed cigarettes and alcohol, according to federal officials.

Sources said the charges are connected to the recent arrest of Prince George’s County Executive Jack B. Johnson, but it is unclear exactly how the cases are related. The arrests are part of a larger investigation of corruption in Prince George’s.

The nine arrested Monday were taken into custody in the early morning hours during an operation that involved 150 law enforcement officers executing as many as a dozen search warrants.

The police officers are Sgt. Richard Delabrer, 45, of Laurel, Cpl. Chong Chin Kim, 42, of Beltsville and Sinisa Simic, 25, of Woodbridge.

According to an indictment filed in U.S. District Court in Maryland, Prince George’s County liquor store owner Amrik Singh Melhi and others paid Delabrer and Kim to guard and secure the distribution of untaxed cigarettes and alcohol in Maryland and Virginia. They and four others are charged with conspiracy to commit extortion.

Simic is charged with conspiracy to distribute cocaine and use of firearms in drug trafficking.

The indictment also seeks the forfeiture of $3.5 million, 25 properties, 13 vehicles and 84 bank accounts affiliated with the crimes.


 

 
1 Comment

Posted by on November 15, 2010 in News, Orange Jumsuit Politicians

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Oscar Grant Verdict

Following the announcement of sentencing of BART Officer Johannes Mehserle for the murder of Oscar Grant, there were protests in Oakland. While most of the protest was peaceful, a group did break off and started a riot, resulting in 152 arrests.

Now it will undoubtebly be conveyed in the MSM that it was black folks protesting (and rioting) – but as you will see from the video, the people protesting came from a large cross section of the local population.

How this will be distorted in the MSM…

Is indeed part of the problem.

Now, being a sports shooter myself, owning weapons of similar capacity as the BART Police use, and having also handled a Taser – I’m not sure I buy the Defense line of confusion between the two. There are a lot of differences between the weight, grip, trigger placement, and color of the weapons – which seem to me to make confusion pretty difficult, if not impossible. Near as difficult as confusing the feel of a revolver with a semi- auto. The manufacturers of Taser weapons in fact, go out of their way to design the weapon to be distinguishable, to prevent such confusion.

While I think the full 15 years would have been excessive…

I think the 2 year sentence was a bit on the light side.

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 6, 2010 in Domestic terrorism

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Orange Jumpsuit Award – Entire City Council of Bell, California

This one is staggering in it’s audacity. Hope these guys get a long time to contemplate how they screwed over their neighbors and community.

161144.ME.0921.BELL.01.RRC

Rizzo faces 53 counts; Bell was ‘corruption on steroids,’ D.A. Cooley says [Updated]

Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley filed charges against eight current and former Bell officials Tuesday, alleging that they misappropriated $5.5 million in public funds. Robert Rizzo, Bell’s former city manager, has been charged with 53 counts of misappropriation of public funds and conflict of interest.

The charges come after a dramatic morning in which authorities swept through Bell and other cities, arresting former and current Bell officials.

Among those arrested were Rizzo; Angela Spaccia, former assistant city manager; Mayor Oscar Hernandez; councilmembers George Mirabal, Teresa Jacobo and Luis Artiga; and former councilmembers George Cole and Victor Bello.

“This is corruption on steroids,” Cooley said.

[Updated at 11:28 a.m.: Cooley said officials used the city’s tax dollars “as their own piggy bank that they then looted at will.”

He said that councilmembers, who earned salaries of nearly $100,000, received $1.2 million for “phantom meetings” — many which never occurred or lasted only a minute or two.

Police Chief Randy Adams, who also stepped down after The Times reported he was earning $457,000, was not arrested.

“Being paid excessive amounts is not a crime,” Cooley said, noting that the investigation is ongoing.

Bail for Rizzo has been set at $3.2 million. Bail for the others ranges from $130,000 to $377,500.]

Rizzo, whose high salary sparked the outrage that led to the investigations of the city, was among those arrested in the sweep. At 10 a.m., officials emerged from Rizzo’s luxury home in Huntington Beach. Rizzo, handcuffed, was escorted into a black SUV.

In Bell, a neighbor of Hernandez said authorities used a battering ram on his front door after he failed to answer the door.

“They broke the door down,” said the neighbor, who only gave his name as Jose. “They knocked down the door and they brought him out in cuffs.”

The city of Bell released a statement about the arrests, calling it a “sad day” for the city.

“Given the sheer volume of charges levied against former Bell Chief Administrative Officer Robert Rizzo and former Assistant CAO Angela Spaccia by the district attorney, it is clear that Rizzo and Spaccia were at the root of the cancer that has afflicted the City of Bell. Also, it is a sad day for Bell that four current and two former members of the council also have been arrested. I am prepared to double down our efforts to continue to restore order, establish good government reforms, and to ensure that Bell is providing needed services to its residents,” said Pedro Carrillo, interim city manager.

Outside City Hall, about two dozen residents gathered as news of the arrests spread. One man used a bullhorn to broadcast the Queen song, “Another One Bites the Dust.” Members of the crowd laughed and applauded, happy to see arrests in the scandal.

For two months, the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office and state and federal authorities have investigated Bell, where high salaries earned by Rizzo and other top officials have sparked widespread outrage. The Times reported last month that Rizzo was set to earn more than $1.5 million in 2010. Additionally, he gave loans totaling $1.6 million to more than 50 city officials, including himself.

Group Jumpsuit Award for former city officials of Bell, California...

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 22, 2010 in Orange Jumsuit Politicians

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 227 other followers

%d bloggers like this: