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Trumpizoids Arrested for Domestic Terrorism

More Trump crazies in the news. Three white nationalists were arrested in Kansas planning to blow up an apartment building because many of the residents were Somalis.

3 Militia Members Arrested In Connection With Plot To Carry Out Terror Attack On Kansas Mosque

Three Men Charged With Plotting Attack On Somali Immigrants In Kansas

Three men have been arrested and charged with planning to use a weapon of mass destruction in a terrorist attack on a mosque and housing complex in a western Kansas town where Somali immigrants live and worship,according to the U.S. Justice Department.

The men were part of a militia group whose members called themselves “The Crusaders,” Acting U.S. Attorney Tom Beall said at a news conference. They had conspired to detonate a bomb at an apartment complex in Garden City, Kan., which houses about 120 people, many of whom are Muslim.

The defendants had allegedly conducted surveillance of the housing complex, stockpiled firearms and bomb-making materials and had even written a manifesto that was to be published in conjunction with the attack, which was scheduled for Nov. 9, the day after the presidential election.

“One of [the defendants] said the bombing would ‘wake people up,’ ” Beall said.

The arrests come after an eight-month investigation of the three men, identified as Curtis Allen, 49, Gavin Wright, 49, and Patrick Eugene Stein, 47. During that time, investigators say, the men considered a number of targets, including churches and public officials who supported Somali immigrants, as well as landlords who rented to Somalis.

They allegedly settled on the apartment complex. Some local people call the complex “Somali Town,” says Garden Valley Church pastor Steve Ensz.

Ensz’s church is about a mile from the apartment complex and helps refugees acclimate to life in western Kansas. He tells NPR he was “saddened, but not surprised” to hear the news and says that most people in Garden City are “good moral people, welcoming to refugees.”

When told that the defendants allegedly wanted to “wake people up,” Ensz said, “They’re the ones that need to be woken up.”

If convicted, the three men would face up to life in federal prison.

 
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Posted by on October 15, 2016 in Domestic terrorism, The Clown Bus

 

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When Mexico Wanted a Wall To Keep Americans Out

Seems that after the Civil War, Mexico was fine with Immigration…Just not black folks immigrating.

1.38 Million Afro-Mexicans live in Mexico today. For decades successive Mexican Governments tried to erase the fact of their existence. Only in 2015 did the Mexican Government finally recognize their existence.

When Mexicans Feared American Immigration

When the path to upward mobility for thousands of free black Americans was south of the border, Mexico stopped just short of calling for their own wall.

If there is one issue that has steered 2016 in a startling direction, it has been immigration. The GOP’s strategy to increase its appeal to Latinos after Mitt Romney’s upset in 2012 quickly unraveled once the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, Donald Trump, charged that Mexico was sending “criminals, drug dealers, rapists” to the United States. Before long, chants of “Build that wall!”—a reference to Trump’s promise to construct a “beautiful” concrete wall along the Mexican border—could be heard at political rallies, high school sporting events and beyond. The GOP’s concerns about inclusion, it seems, pale in comparison to Americans’ anxieties about jobs, crime, national security and the sense that there is a teeming mass of people desperate to burst across the border.

It hasn’t always been this way; for much of American history, the U.S.-Mexico border has been largely unprotected. Only in 1891 did the United States start deporting illegal immigrants (a category at the time limited principally to Chinese workers as well as felons, paupers and the insane), and it wasn’t until 1924 that Congress formed the Border Patrol. And at one point, remarkably, our contemporary debate was even flipped: Hordes of Americans wanted to escape their bleak prospects for a better life—and the place they wanted to flee to was Mexico.

Carmen Robles, afromexican colonel in Mexican revolution.

But Mexico didn’t want them. The story unfolded in the late 19th century, in the form of a little-known black migration scheme to the low-lying, underdeveloped parts of south and central Mexico—Veracruz, Oaxaca, Guerrero, Michoacán and San Luis Potosi—and was spearheaded by a man sparingly remembered by history. He intended [to avoid repeating scheme] to relocate thousands of black families to start a new colony in Mexico, which would have radically changed the demographics and the economy of that region, if not all of Mexico. The plan provoked sensationalist, often racist, reports in the Mexican press—one warned of a “race war”—and fiery fights in the country’s Senate. In the end, it failed—no such colony was ever settled. But the history lesson, of a time when our current debate was flipped on its head, is a timely reminder of those fluid identities, and just how easily these centuries-old, deeply ingrained fears can be stoked—on either side of the border.

Born as a slave in 1894 on a cotton plantation in the small South Texas town of Victoria, William Henry Ellis managed in his early 20s to transform himself into a successful merchant in San Antonio. To do so, however, he had to craft an alternative persona for himself as a Mexican named Guillermo Enrique Eliseo (his name translated into Spanish) to gain entry to the all-white business settings that would have otherwise been closed to him. To further his ethnic charades, Ellis cultivated a showy Mexican-style mustache, dressed in the Mexican fashion, and used the fluent Spanish that he had learned in Victoria as a child.

In the 19th century, during the administration of President Porifirio Díaz, Mexico was hoping to modernize its economy by attracting more immigrants. Ellis did much of his business across the border in Mexico, and he saw the United States’ southern neighbor, with its lack of legal segregation, as a place of great promise not only for himself but for other African-Americans as well. He thus set in motion in 1889 an ambitious plan to facilitate the large-scale migration of African-Americans to Mexico.

Vicente Guerrero, a mulatto and Mexico`s 2nd president, was a hero in Mexico`s War of Independence from Spain, and an active abolitionist. The state of Guerrero in Mexico was named in his honor. His grandson, Vicente Riva Palacio y Guerrero, was one of Mexico`s most influential politicians and novelists.

Taking advantage of new railroad connections between the U.S. and Mexico, Ellis journeyed to Mexico City. Tucked in his luggage, he carried letters of introduction from the Mexican consul in San Antonio to Mexico’s Secretary of Foreign Affairs, Ignacio Mariscal, and Secretary of Fomento (Public Works), Carlos Pacheco Villalobos. Once in the Mexican capital, Ellis persuaded Pacheco, a grizzled former general who had lost both an arm and a leg in Mexico’s recent war against the French-backed emperor Maximilian, to grant him a 10-year contract to colonize up to twenty thousand settlers in Mexico. Although the race and nationality of the colonists was not specified in the contract—only that each colonist would have a certificate attesting to their “morality, honesty and diligence”—Ellis’s comments to the press left little doubt that he intended to fill the colonists’ ranks with African-Americans.

The colonization movement represented one of the most divisive fault lines running through African-American politics in the late 19th century. Even as they defended the right of blacks to live wherever they pleased, most black leaders, from Frederick Douglass to Norris Wright Cuney, the influential chairman of the Texas’ Republican Party, decried efforts to relocate African-Americans (a movement known in the language of the day as colonization). These figures charged that colonization not only diminished the pool of African-American voters in the United States; it also encouraged long-standing white fantasies of solving the United States’ “race problem” by ethnically cleansing all blacks from the nation. Even the great liberator Abraham Lincoln had briefly entertained thoughts of colonizing freed slaves on Mexico’s Tehuantepec isthmus or Yucatán peninsula. Above all, by presenting blacks’ real home as elsew

The most famous black Mexican was Gaspar Yanga, whom was a Mandingo slave brought to Mexico from Cuba to work the sugarcane Plantations. He successfully led a series of revolts resulting in the slaves overthrowing the Plantation owners, and founding the first free slave town in the Americas, which bears his name.

here, emigration diverted attention from what many African-Americans perceived as the more pressing task: achieving their full civil rights in the United States. “I cannot see wherein [African-Americans] would gain anything [by colonization],” contended Cuney. “They are so thoroughly identified with the perpetuity of our American institutions, that it seems to me to be rather late for them now to seek homes in a new country with the customs, government and people of which they are thoroughly unacquainted. There is much more glory, honor and gain for the colored man here in the land of his birth, and here he should stay and fight his way to the front.” 

Relocating to Mexico, however, did not necessarily represent a retreat from politics in Ellis’s eyes. Rather, it highlighted the shortcomings of Reconstruction—in particular, the federal government’s failure to support blacks’ economic aspirations. Whites blamed the poverty in which blacks found themselves trapped after Emancipation on a lack of work ethic. Ellis, in contrast, knew that the problem lay not with African-American character but rather with their lack of access to land, the foundation of wealth in a predominantly agricultural society. If the place of their birth would not facilitate black access to property, perhaps Mexico, in its desire to attract immigrants, would. “The idea of Mr. Ellis,” explained one observer, “is that the colonists will become self-sustaining farmers.”

Colonization tended to draw its support from the most marginalized members of the black community—those, unsurprisingly, who suffered the worst oppressions and therefore had the least to lose in relocating to an unfamiliar land. Even before Ellis finalized his contract with the Mexican government, he had compiled a list of several hundred families from four adjoining Texas counties— Fort Bend, Matagorda, Brazoria and Wharton, all “places where the colored people have been having trouble” in Ellis’s apt phrase—who had expressed interest in moving to Mexico. These counties were home to the largest African-American majorities in all of Texas. Not only had these conditions led unsympathetic whites to dub the region “Senegambia”; it also spawned fierce racial strife as local whites endeavored, despite the demographic imbalance, to “free . . . themselves from Negro rule” by threatening the area’s black elected officials….Read The Rest of This Engrossing Story Here

The Los Angeles Pobladores, or “townspeople,” were a group of 44 settlers and four soldiers from Mexico who established the famed city on this day in 1781 in what is now California. The settlers came from various Spanish castes, with over half of the group being of African descent.

 

 
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Posted by on June 5, 2016 in Black History

 

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Black Woman Smashed in Face WIth Beer Mug for Speaking Swahili

Another sickening attack on a woman, sitting with her 4 children in an Applebee’s in Wisconsin… Another Trump supporter undoubtedly was the perpetrator of this violent attack for no reason.

This is what happens when politicians use the news, and the news itself stirs up hate.

Applebee’s Customer Allegedly Attacked For Speaking Foreign Language

Asma Mohamed Jama before and after attack

She says she was speaking to a relative in Swahili when a stranger smashed a beer mug in her face.

A woman who was attacked by another woman in a suburban Minneapolis restaurant, allegedly because she was speaking a foreign language, said she feels traumatized and may move out of Minnesota.

Asma Jama told Minnesota Public Radio News (http://bit.ly/1S7gWxE ) that she was chatting with her family in Swahili, one of three languages she speaks, at an Applebee’s in Coon Rapids on Oct. 30 when a woman in a nearby booth smashed a beer mug in her face. The attack left cuts on her face and a deep gash on her lip that required stiches.

“Somebody hit me because I was speaking a different language,” said Jama, an ethnic Somali who came to Minnesota in 2000 from Kenya. Jama said she couldn’t “believe after all these years somebody hit me because I’m different.”

The woman accused in the attack, Jodie Burchard-Risch, was arrested shortly after the incident and charged with third-degree assault. The Minnesota chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations has called for hate crime charges.

The Accused – Jodie Burchard-Risch

Additional charges are possible, said Paul Young, criminal division chief in the Anoka County Attorney’s Office. He noted that prosecutors are still investigating and waiting for medical reports.

A criminal complaint alleges that Burchard-Risch was upset that the victim was speaking in a foreign language and yelled at her, then refused to leave when restaurant managers tried to intervene. Burchard-Risch continued to yell and threw a drink on the victim, then smashed a beer mug in her face before fleeing, according to the complaint.

No working phone numbers for Burchard-Risch could be found Saturday by The Associated Press. Burchard-Risch is scheduled to return to court on Dec. 7. It wasn’t immediately known if she had an attorney.

Jama said she feels “traumatized” and doesn’t feel safe leaving her house alone. When she needed to have the 17 stitches removed from her lip on Thursday, she asked her cousin to join her.

“I’m actually thinking about moving out of Minnesota,” she said. “I’m scared for my life. I don’t feel comfortable here anymore.”

 
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Posted by on November 8, 2015 in Domestic terrorism, The Definition of Racism

 

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