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Even Republicans Are Tired of North Carolina Legislature Fascism

There come a time in everyone’s life when you see something, and recognize “This ain’t right”…

And respond to it.

It may be something as small as standing up for someone, or some idea being unfairly treated.

Sometimes its a big thing, putting your person in physical or legal danger.

The difference between American Patriots and the white-wing scum who have taken over the Republican Party is simply this…

Patriots believe in putting the values andd laws of our country over their Party.

Republican North Carolina judge resigns — and slams the GOP on the way out

In a dramatic response to a power-grab by Republicans in the North Carolina legislature, a Republican judge resigned today to circumvent efforts to strip power from the Democratic governor.

The Charlotte Observer reports that following today’s surprise resignation by Republican Judge J. Douglas McCullough, Democrat John Arrowood was sworn in. Judge McCullough worked as a staffer for Senator Harrison Schmitt (R-NM) before being appointed by President Ronald Reagan as United States Attorney in the eastern district of North Carolina.

Since Democrat Roy Cooper was elected Governor of North Carolina last fall, the Republican Legislature has gone to great lengths to strip his office of power. Yet with a three-sentence resignation letter this morning, Judge McCullough has proven that not all Republicans are willing to go along with shenanigans by legislative Republicans.

North Carolina has a mandatory retirement age for judges. To prevent the Democratic Party governor from appointing replacements for Court of Appeals judges nearing forced retirement, the Republican Legislature passed a bill to shrink the size of the court from 15 to 12 judges — thereby denying the Democrat of three scheduled appointments.

The legislation was vetoed on Friday, but a successful veto override was expected later tonight.

However, before the legislature could vote to override Governor Cooper’s veto of House Bill 239, Judge McCullough resigned 36 days prior to his forced retirement. This allowed the appointment of Judge Arrowood at 9:45 a.m. this morning.

“I did not want my legacy to be the elimination of a seat and the impairment of a court that I have served on,” Judge McCullough explained.

Newly sworn-in Judge John Arrowood is the first openly gay member of the North Carolina Court of Appeals.

 

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Assimilate or Die…History and the Chumph

Been watching, with interest, a PBS show, “The American Experience: The Great War” describing the events leading to, and America’s entry into WWI. Of particular interest is Woodrow Wilson. who was President at that time, and how he migrated from professing strong anti-war sentiments to becoming near dictator in his pursuit of American involvement in the war.

America in the 1900-1920 era had just expeienced a period of mass immigration. Over 30% of the population was foreign born. Immigrants were so prevalent that language became an issue in the first brigades formed to go fight in WWI, where the soldiers spoke 42 different  languages, not including English.

Intensely racist with reputed relations with the KKK, Wilson is reviled for his support of Jim Crow, and re-segregation of the Federal Government. His racism only extended to African-Americans, and when setting up the Military, Asians and Hispanics were considered “white” and were enlisted in white regiments, while black soldiers were enlisted in all-black segregated units of which the Harlem Hellcats are the most famous.

“The white men were roused by a mere instinct of self-preservationuntil at last there had sprung into existence a great Ku Klux Klan, a veritable empire of the South, to protect the Southern country.” – Woodrow Wilson

Wilson, faced with a large immigrant population did two things. First, the largest immigrant population in America at the time were German-Americans. Wilson ordered a propaganda campaign to erase the German culture in America through mass intimidation and overt anti-ethnicism. German immigrants were harassed, violently attacked, and in several cases lynched. He then launched a campaign to erase the use of the “hyphenated” American (sound familiar?) insisting that ethnic and class divisions would disappear if only “we were all just Americans”.Lastly, he asked Congress to pass two acts, the “Espionage Act”, and the “Sedition Act”, which allowed the government to jail anyone for even minimal objection to the actions of the government. Thousands were jailed for reasons as trite as criticizing the “Draft Act” in a bar. During the 1910-1920 period America became no different than the authoritarian government which would be later formed by the fascists and communists.

“[Reconstruction government was detested] not because the Republican Party was dreaded but because the dominance of an ignorant and inferior race was justly dreaded.” – Woodrow Wilson

Image result for trump borg

The Chumph Borg

“Any man who carries a hyphen about with him carries a dagger that he is ready to plunge into the vitals of this Republic whenever he gets ready.” – Woodrow Wilson

So when you hear the Chumph talk about “Immigrants”…It’s just the same shit, different century. And the place he wants to take the country is right back to the fascism of the early 20th Century. Look at the laws being passed by Republicans to punish peaceful protesters. This crap is right out of the neo-Nazi “Sedition Act” passed by Wilson.

“Now came multitudes of men of the lowest class from the south of Italy, and men of the meaner sort out of Hungary and Poland, men out of the ranks, where there was neither skill nor energy nor any initiative of quick intelligence, and they came in numbers which increased from year to year, as if the countries of the south of Europe were disburdening themselves of the more sordid and hapless elements of their population.” – Woodrow Wilson

Trump wants immigrants to ‘share our values.’ They say assimilation is much more complex

Growing up in La Puente in the 1980s, Alex Espinoza was a typical child of the Reagan era. He collected “Star Wars” action figures and played with Rubik’s Cube.

But Espinoza was Mexican, born in Tijuana and brought to the United States by his mother when he was about 2 years old. He downplayed his Mexican roots to fit in. At the time, it seemed the worst thing in the world for a boy to be labeled as “a TJ” — literally someone from Tijuana, but also shorthand for an unassimilated Mexican.

“I grew up preferring the taste of a Big Mac over a burrito. I grew up preferring the taste of tuna noodle casserole over menudo,” he said. “Until I went to Mexico as a grad student, Mexico was this kind of static in the background.”

Three decades later, President Trump has sparked a new debate over immigration and assimilation that has Espinoza and many others reflecting on what it means to blend into American culture.

While much has been made about Trump’s harsh talk of deporting those here illegally, the president’s comments about the need for immigrants to fully embrace American culture has renewed a long-running debate that dates back generations.

“Not everyone who seeks to join our country will be able to successfully assimilate,” President Trump said in a campaign-trail speech in which he called for new immigrants to pass an “ideological certification to make sure that those we are admitting to our country share our values and love our people.”

In one Republican debate, Trump declared that “we have a country where, to assimilate, you have to speak English … This is a country where we speak English, not Spanish.”

Though Espinoza and others might disagree with Trump’s policies on immigration, they say discussions about assimilation get to the heart of a balancing act all immigrants face: being American while preserving a strong sense of where they came from.

“Have I been assimilated? I don’t know,” said the 45-year-old director of the graduate creative writing and literary arts program at Cal State Los Angeles. “Some people will probably say yes — look at how I dress and speak and where I’m educated. And some people will say no — he speaks Spanish and has a Mexican passport.”

When he went to Mexico for the first time as an adult, the way he spoke, tripping over some Spanish words, instantly pegged him as American. Espinoza is a permanent legal resident but believes that even if he became a U.S. citizen he would never be considered “fully American” by some people.

“Even if I started right now speaking in a Southern drawl and listening to country music, I’m still going to be Mexican,” he said. “My skin is still going to be a certain shade. Assimilation is not this thing where it’s like, OK, I’m one of you.”

Though people often define assimilation in starkly different ways, a Pew Research Center survey released in February showed that 92% of Americans say it’s at least somewhat important for a person to speak English to be considered “truly American,” with 70% saying it’s “very” important.

More than 80% of the survey’s respondents believed that sharing American culture and traditions is at least somewhat important to national identity.

“We at least have absorbed and believe this national narrative that we are a nation of immigrants,” said Bruce Stokes, director of global economic attitudes at Pew. “But … it’s not so easy once you get into some of the details of diversity. People are saying, ‘This is good for the country, but it’s not good for me,’ and that ‘Diversity is good, but I actually I don’t like the fact that someone speaks Spanish in the store I go to.’”

These questions have dominated immigrant communities dating back to the 19th century, when the Italians, Irish, Germans, Chinese and other groups faced questions about whether they were true Americans.

The foreign-born share of the U.S. population has quadrupled in the five decades since the establishment of the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, which ended a quota system based on national origin that favored white European immigrants. In 1960, 9.7 million foreign-born residents were living in the U.S. In 2014, there were 42.2 million, according to census data and the Pew Research Center.

Kevin Solis, who works for the immigration advocacy group Dream Team LA, said politicians’ statements about assimilation just add fuel to an already sensitive subject.

“When you say, ‘They need to assimilate,’ you’re already beginning with the false notion that they don’t want to, that they’re coming here as an invading force,” he said. “It’s coded in the sense that these are ‘other’ people, foreigners who want to do harm to our nation, and that’s not the case.”

Jim Chang, an information systems specialist from Irvine, recalled meeting with one of his son’s teacher; she kept repeating what he was saying.

“I know he was repeating, you know, saying it more than once because she was worried I didn’t understand,” Chang, 53, said.

Though he spoke English fairly well and understood it even better, Chang said his Korean accent meant he would always stick out.

“It doesn’t matter if you have 12 years or 20 years in the U.S. If they hear us sound a little different, they judge,” he said.

That’s something he said he believes his son, a fifth-grader, shouldn’t have to face. Chang speaks Korean to him, but his son, Jimmy, responds in English.

“I realize that we don’t plan to return to live in Korea. We belong in California now,” Chang said.

But Carmen Fought, a linguistics professor at Pitzer College, said that everyone has an accent regardless of how well they speak English. Whether it’s the Cajun or so-called “Minnesota nice” or “Bronx” or other accent not quite on the radar of American pop culture, everyone in the U.S. speaks with an accent, she said.

Not all accents, however, are perceived as equally American.

“A way of speaking that’s associated with a group that’s stigmatized is also going to be stigmatized,” Fought said. “There’s also going to be racism and prejudice against that way of speaking.”

Karen, a 24-year-old honor student at Cal State Fullerton, is an aspiring certified public accountant. She volunteers for the IRS — where her ability to speak Spanish is a major asset — helping low-income people fill out their taxes.

The night Trump was elected, Karen — a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, recipient who asked that her last name not be used because she fears deportation — suddenly felt as if she stood out even though she was an infant sleeping in the back seat of a car when she was brought to the U.S. illegally from Mexico.

Karen hasn’t been back to Mexico since then but grew up in the overwhelmingly Latino community of Huntington Park, watching Spanish-language television with her grandmother and working in a Mexican restaurant.

Moving to Orange County for college was like moving to a different world, Karen said. At least until Trump’s election, she felt that she was safer as a college student than her parents, who have labor-oriented jobs.

Her younger brother is a DACA recipient also, and she had him move in with her so they could remove their parents’ address from their federal forms.

“Sometimes I feel like I don’t belong anywhere,” she said. “In Mexico, I would be seen very differently because of my accent. It’s like, god, what do I do? If I were to go back, I wouldn’t have anything back there.”

“On the one side, the Hispanics tell you, ‘You’re way too American.’ On the other, you’ll have the Americans telling you you’re too Hispanic. It’s hard to be in the middle.”

“What makes me American? It’s not only the 24 years of my life,” she said. “It’s that this is all I know.”

 

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American Fascism – The Christian Right

This is an interview based on a book by Chris Hedges released in 2007, which has increasing urgency today – “American Fascists: The Christian Right and the War on America”. You see the influence of a lot of this, particularly in the Tea Party.

An article  in the conservative UK Telegraph, The stunning decline of Barack Obama: 10 key reasons why the Obama presidency is in meltdown, by Nile Gardiner discusses Gardiner’s perception of why President Obama’s poll numbers are continuing to fall. One of the interesting

10. Obama doesn’t believe in American greatness

Barack Obama has made it clear that he doesn’t believe in American exceptionalism, and has made apologising for his country into an art form. In a speech to the United Nations last September he stated that “no one nation can or should try to dominate another nation. No world order that elevates one nation or group of people over another will succeed. No balance of power among nations will hold.” It is difficult to see how a US president who holds these views and does not even accept America’s greatness in history can actually lead the world’s only superpower with force and conviction.

The concept of “American Exceptionalism” gained huge coinage during the Bushit Administration. No secret Bush, a number of his key advisers were Dominionists, and many of his court picks, including those on the Supreme Court ARE Dominionists. When you scratch the surface of the American Exceptionalism concept, you find at the core the belief that America’s success is “God Given”, and pre-ordained. As such, any action taken by America is wholly within the scope of God’s will. Wrap you head around that and you begin to understand why torture was OK, the Constitution wasn’t important, and Republicans – largely captive savants of the Christian Right don’t belive their policy of nullification and nihilism relative to governing the country don’t really matter.

God will make it right. You also begin to understand why it is so important to the right to see the Constitution as a God Driven document.

This IS Fascism.

 

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The Sno’ Ho’s Fascism

As a descendant of one of the 3/5th people in the Original Constitution, and the group of folks denied Constitutional Rights for 100 years after the 14th Amendment – you will have to excuse me for giving the side-eye to conservatives standing up talking as if they somehow own the description “Real Americans”.

Indeed, historically conservative movements such as fascism have fueled their adherents fervor by uber-nationalism focused around the definition of who was a “real citizen”. Adolph Hitler’s definition of Germans excluded whole swaths of the population, including – but not limited to Jews.

What we have here with the Tea Bagger sect of conservatism in the United States is the same sort of toxic plastic patriotism.

 
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Posted by on February 22, 2010 in Stupid Tea Bagger Tricks

 

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