RSS

Tag Archives: african american

Second Black Judge Found Dead…Ethnic Cleansing of the Courts?

Two black Judges found dead in two days. The second under mysterious circumstances.

To tell the truth, after the sleazebags went to extremes to  force the illegitimate Gorsuch on the Courts, and with the appointment of Sessions as AG…

I really don’t doubt the possibility of their murdering Judges to whiten the Courts.

 

Image: Cook County Associate Judge Raymond Myles

Cook County Associate Judge Raymond Myles

Chicago Police Arrest Suspect in Fatal Shooting of Judge, Others Sought

Chicago police have arrested a man in connection with the shooting death of a Cook county judge in what police described as a “targeted robbery.”

Joshua Smith, 37, turned himself in to answer detectives’ questions Wednesday and was later charged with first-degree murder and other charges in the death of Associate Judge Raymond Myles, who was shot multiple times outside his home at around 5 a.m. on Monday.

Ballistics evidence matched a gun used in a January robbery where a victim was shot and wounded, and surveillance video captured the license plate of a vehicle seen leaving the scene, Chicago Police Chief of Detectives Melissa Staples said at a press conference.

“The motive of this crime is robbery, which we do not believe is random — nor do we believe Smith acted alone,” she said.

A female friend who worked out with Myles had first encountered the gunman on Monday morning. Words were exchanged and she was shot in the leg, police said. Myles was coming to her aid when he was fatally shot, although he was not the target of the robbery, NBC Chicago reported, citing police.

Smith was convicted of armed robbery with a firearm in 2003 and served six years in prison, Staples said.

Staples at Wednesday’s press conference would not say who the target of the robbery was or how many other people may have been involved, citing the ongoing investigation. She said more details could emerge at a bond hearing scheduled for Thursday.

First African-American Female Judge On New York’s Top Court Found Dead

Associate Judge Sheila Abdus-Salaam, the first African-American woman to be appointed to New York’s Court of Appeals, was found dead on Wednesday in the Hudson River.

She had been reported missing from her home in Harlem.

The New York Times reports:

“Officers with the New York Police Department’s Harbor Unit responded about 1:45 p.m. to a report of a person floating by the shore near West 132nd Street in Upper Manhattan.

“Judge Abdus-Salaam, 65, was taken to a pier on the Hudson River and was pronounced dead by paramedics shortly after 2 p.m.

“The police were investigating how she ended up in the river, and it was not clear how long Judge Abdus-Salaam, who lived nearby in Harlem, had been missing.

“There were no signs of trauma on her body, the police said. She was fully clothed.

“A law enforcement official said investigators had found no signs of criminality. Her husband identified her body.”

Abdus-Salaam became the first female Muslim to serve as a U.S. judge when she joined the New York State Supreme Court in 1994, according to Zakiyyah Muhammad, the founding director of the Institute of Muslim American Studies, as quoted in The Times.

In 2013, Gov. Andrew Cuomo, D-N.Y., appointed her to the state’s highest court, known as the Court of Appeals.

In a statement, Cuomo said Judge Abdus-Salaam was a pioneer with an “unshakable moral compass.”

Her nomination was part of a push by Cuomo to diversify the court.

When Judge Rowan Wilson joined the court this year, it was the first time the state’s highest court had two African-American judges serving on it.

In a statement, Chief Judge Janet DiFiore said Abdus-Salaam’s “personal warmth, uncompromising sense of fairness and bright legal mind were an inspiration to all of us who had the good fortune to know her.”

The Court of Appeals has been on recess since the end of last month. The court is due back in session in less than two weeks.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

The Chumph on Crack – “I’ll Win 95% of the black vote”

The Chumph believes his first term will be so great, 95% of black folks will vote for him for a second term.

Pretty good turnaround, considering by current polling 99% of black folks intend to vote against him ever being President in the first place.

Of course he made this pitch to black folks twice in the last two days in towns where the population is 95%, and 98% white respectively.

Donald Trump’s Pitch To Black Voters: ‘What The Hell Do You Have To Lose?’

GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump pitched his candidacy to black voters Friday, suggesting they vote for him in November because they are desperate enough to do so.

The reality TV star, who claimed in 2011 he has “a great relationship with the blacks,” has polled miserably among black voters. He sought to remedy that at a rally in Dimondale, Michigan, saying he wants the vote of “every African-American citizen in this country who wants a better future.”

“Look how much African-American communities are suffering under Democratic control. To those I say the following: What do you have to lose by trying something new, like Trump?” he said. “You’re living in poverty. Your schools are no good. You have no jobs. Fifty-eight percent of your youth is unemployed. What the hell do you have to lose?”

He continued, “I will produce for the African-Americans. And the Democrats will not produce. All they’ve done is taken advantage of your vote. If you keep voting for the same people, you will keep getting exactly the same result.”

Trump made similar remarks during a speech in Charlotte on Thursday.

Trump’s claims, like comments he’s made about other racial groups, are broad and hardly representative of every black American. His claim about black youth unemployment is also misleading.

And according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted this month, black voters are actually more likely to be optimistic about the future than white or Hispanic voters. The poll also found that 51 percent of African-Americans think life has gotten better over the last 50 years, versus 33 percent of white voters and 40 percent of Hispanic voters.

Trump also claimed Friday that he’d have the support of 95 percent of black Americans by the end of his first term ― a statistic that appears highly unlikely, given that Trump is currently polling around 1 percent with black voters nationally.

The candidate’s past attempts at appealing to black voters have not gone over so well: In a widely-mocked moment in June, he singled out a black supporter at a rally and asked the crowd to “look at my African-American over here.”

 
2 Comments

Posted by on August 20, 2016 in The Clown Bus

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

CNN Panel on “My African-American” Gets Hot!

So now we are going to call them “African-American conservatives”…

Instead of Uncle Tom?

Personally I don’t see the media firestorm on this one. You got a Negro sitting up there in an all white crowd, made up in no small part by KKK, white supremacists, and neo-Nazis…Everybody already know what he is.

 
10 Comments

Posted by on June 4, 2016 in Black Conservatives, The Clown Bus

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Smithsonian African-American Museum Opens

The National Museum of African American Culture and History has opened. Love the idea, but really am no fan of the building architecture, which is both decidedly visually unexciting, and unlike the Native American Museum seems to have no visual cultural clues as to it’s function.

National Museum of African American History and Culture; (NMAAHC) construction site - Conststution Avenue and 14 th Street image taken on Conststution site October 23, 2015.

 

Smithsonian’s National African-American Museum opens at last

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture was over a century in the making. In 1915, black Civil War veterans collected funds they later put toward creating a museum on the National Mall that would celebrate African-American achievement. In 1929, President Calvin Coolidge signed Public Resolution 107, establishing a commission to plan its construction, but the project went nowhere. It took a renewed effort by lawmakers and African-American leaders beginning in the 1960s, and then decades of planning and proposals, before President George W. Bush signed legislation in 2003 authorizing the museum, which is set to open September 24, steps from the Washington Monument.

“It’s one of those sites and projects that comes about only once in a generation,” says the lead designer of the building, David Adjaye. “It’s always magical to complete a project, but to complete this one on the National Mall, it’s very profound. It’s very humbling.”

Construction on the exterior of the building, a glass structure wrapped in a three-tiered bronze-colored scrim that’s meant to recall a motif in African sculpture (it looks like boxes stacked on a figure’s head), was completed in 2015. Curators are now filling the galleries with artifacts from a collection of some 34,000 items spanning centuries or longer. Museum Director Lonnie Bunch says the exhaustive preparation and organizing is “really almost like planning a military exercise.”

Larger artifacts already in place include a 1944 training plane used by the black military pilots known as the Tuskegee Airmen; a once-segregated railway car and a guard tower from the Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola, both of which the museum lowered in place with cranes before constructing the roof; a 19th-century slave cabin from South Carolina; and Chuck Berry’s red Cadillac.

“When I walk through, I feel the weight of my ancestors,” Bunch says. “I feel an amazing sense of joy that we are close to giving to America, giving to the world, a gift. A gift of understanding who we are as a people in ways that we haven’t before.”

The museum’s nine floors contain three history galleries covering slavery through present day, including the #BlackLivesMatter movement; a theater named for donor Oprah Winfrey; culture galleries featuring African-American icons of music, theater, film and television; and a Contemplative Court, where visitors can reflect on what they’ve seen.

Adjaye has said “there’s triumph and there’s also incredible tragedy” in the history of the African-American experience. Bunch agrees: “You cannot tell stories of celebration and resistance without understanding the trials and travails.”

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 2, 2016 in Black History

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

How Much Do You Know About Black Literature?

Think you are well versed?

Take this Quiz!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 13, 2015 in Black History

 

Tags: , , , , ,

The WSJ’s Uncle Tom, Jason Riley

When I was a young man starting out in business, reading the Wall Street Journal was a requirement for those who wanted to be savvy about the business world. In the passenger lounges in airports or the train station legions of folks read the paper daily on their commute. The quality of the articles, insights, and writing was incredible…

Then something happened. That something was the acquisition of the paper by right wing media mogul Rupert Murdoch…

The paper sold out to conservative clowns, and reading it became akin to skinny dipping in a sewer. Much like when well known and respected product manufacturers sell out to mass marketers who wish to profit from their name to sell cheap, low quality goods…The WSJ  became Breitbart with a historically respected and legitimate name.

One of the requirements of any conservative rag is to have their very own, in house Uncle Tom to deflect from the racist mouthings and utterances of their white “reporters”.

Jason Riley’s foray into self prostitution made him the WSJ’s boy.

“I think there’s a pattern at MSNBC of them hiring Black mediocrities like Melissa Harris-Perry, Michael Eric Dyson, Touré, and, of course — the granddaddy of them all — Al Sharpton, simply to race-bait,”Wall Street Journal’s said on WSJ’s Political Diary program.

So… I got curious. From what pedestal of accomplishment does Uncle Jason base his utterings? So I looked up the bios…

Jason Riley

Editorial board member, The Wall Street Journal.

Jason Riley is a member of The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board. He joined the paper in 1994 as a copyreader on the national news desk in New York. He moved to the editorial page in 1995 as copyreader and later became a copy editor. In April 1996, he was named to the newly created position of editorial interactive editor and maintained the editorial and Leisure & Arts section of WSJ.com. He was named a senior editorial page writer in March 2000, and member of the Editorial Board in 2005.

Born in Buffalo, N.Y., Mr. Riley earned a bachelor’s degree in English from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He has also worked for USA Today and the Buffalo News.

Melissa V. Harris-Perry

is host of MSNBC’s “Melissa Harris-Perry.” The show airs on Saturdays and Sundays from 10AM to noon ET.

Harris-Perry is also professor of political science at Tulane University, where she is founding director of the Anna Julia Cooper Project on Gender, Race, and Politics in the South. She previously served on the faculties of the University of Chicago and Princeton University.

Harris-Perry is author of the well received book, Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America(Yale 2011) which argues that persistent harmful stereotypes-invisible to many but painfully familiar to black women-profoundly shape black women’s politics, contribute to policies that treat them unfairly, and make it difficult for black women to assert their rights in the political arena.

Her first book, Barbershops, Bibles, and BET: Everyday Talk and Black Political Thought, won the 2005 W. E. B. Du Bois Book Award from the National Conference of Black Political Scientists and 2005 Best Book Award from the Race and Ethnic Politics Section of the American Political Science Association.

Professor Harris-Perry is a columnist for The Nation magazine, where she writes a monthly column also titled Sister Citizen. In addition to hosting her own show on MSNBC she provides expert commentary on U.S. elections, racial issues, religious questions and gender concerns for a variety of other media outlets.

Her academic research is inspired by a desire to investigate the challenges facing contemporary black Americans and to better understand the multiple, creative ways that African Americans respond to these challenges. Her work is published in scholarly journals and edited volumes and her interests include the study of African American political thought, black religious ideas and practice, and social and clinical psychology.

Professor Harris-Perry’s creative and dynamic teaching is also motivated by the practical political and racial issues of our time. Professor Harris-Perry has taught students from grade school to graduate school and has been recognized for her commitment to the classroom as a site of democratic deliberation on race.

She travels extensively speaking to colleges, organizations and businesses in the United States and abroad. In 2009 Professor Harris-Perry became the youngest scholar to deliver the W.E.B. Du Bois Lectures at Harvard University. Also in 2009 she delivered the prestigious Ware Lecture, becoming the youngest woman to ever do so.

Professor Harris-Perry received her B.A. in English from Wake Forest University, her Ph.D. in political science from Duke University and an honorary doctorate from Meadville Lombard Theological School. And she studied theology at Union Theological Seminary in New York. She lives in New Orleans with her husband, James Perry, and is the mother of a terrific daughter, Parker.

Professor Harris-Perry also sits on the advisory board for “Chef’s Move!”, a program whose mission is to diversify kitchen management by providing training, experience and mentorship to minority applicants from New Orleans, sending them to New York City for culinary school training and then bringing them back again to become leaders in the kitchen and in their community.

Michael Eric Dyson

Michael Eric Dyson (born October 23, 1958) is an American academic, author, and radio host. He is a professor of sociology at Georgetown University.[2] Described by Michael A. Fletcher as “a Princeton PhD and a child of the streets who takes pains never to separate the two”,[3] Dyson has authored and edited 18 books dealing with subjects such as Malcolm XMartin Luther King, Jr.Marvin GayeNas’s debut album IllmaticBill CosbyTupac Shakur and Hurricane Katrina.

Dyson was born to Everett and Addie Dyson in Detroit, Michigan. He attended Cranbrook School in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan on an academic scholarship but left and completed his education at Northwestern High School.[3] He became an ordainedBaptistminister at 19 years of age.[4]Having worked in factories in Detroit to support his family, he entered Knoxville College as a freshman at age 21.[5] Dyson received his bachelor’s degreemagna cum laude, from Carson–Newman College in 1985.[3] He obtained his master’s and Ph.D in religion, from Princeton University. Dyson serves on the board of directors of the Common Ground Foundation, a project dedicated to empowering urban youth in the United States

Dyson has taught at Chicago Theological SeminaryBrown University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel HillColumbia UniversityDePaul University, and the University of Pennsylvania.[3] Since 2007, he has been a Professor of Sociology at Georgetown University. His 1994 bookMaking Malcolm: The Myth and Meaning of Malcolm X became a New York Times notable book of the year.[9] In his 2006 book Come Hell or High Water: Hurricane Katrina and the Color of Disaster, Dyson analyzes the political and social events in the wake of the catastrophe against the backdrop of an overall “failure in race and class relations”.[10][11][12] In 2010, Dyson edited Born to Use Mics: Reading Nas’s Illmatic, with contributions based on the album’s tracks by, among others, Kevin Coval, Kyra D. Gaunt (“Professor G”), dream hamptonMarc Lamont HillAdam Mansbach, and Mark Anthony Neal.[13] Dyson’s own essay in this anthology, “One Love,” Two Brothers, Three Verses, explains how the current US penal system disfavors young black males more than any other segment of the population.[14][15] Dyson hosted a radio show, which aired on Radio One, from January 2006 to February 2007. He was also a commentator on National Public Radio and CNN, and is a regular guest on Real Time with Bill Maher. Beginning July 2011 Michael Eric Dyson became a political analyst for MSNBC.

Touré

Touré (born Touré Neblett; March 20, 1971) is an American writer, music journalistcultural critic, and television personality. He is the host ofFuse‘s Hiphop Shop and On the Record and co-host of The Cycle on MSNBC. He was also a contributor to MSNBC‘s The Dylan Ratigan Show and serves on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Nominating Committee. He teaches a course on the history of hip hop at the Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, part of the Tisch School of the Arts in New York.

Touré is the author of several books, including The Portable Promised Land (2003), Soul City (2004), Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness? What It Means To Be Black Now (2011), and I Would Die 4 U: Why Prince Became an Icon (2013).

While a student at Emory University, Touré founded the school’s black student newspaper, The Fire This Time,[7] which has been criticized for being militantly anti-white.[8][9]The Daily Caller took issue with the fact that the publication only solicited donations from blacks, and that its articles praised noted anti-Semitesblack supremacists, and conspiracy theorists such as H. Rap Brownand Frances Cress Welsing, whom Touré invited to Emory’s campus. The Caller also criticized Touré’s use of a hoaxed hate crime at Emory as a rationale for a list of demands against the university, even after the crime’s ostensible target, Sabrina Collins, admitted that her accusations were a hoax of her creation. Touré defended The Fire This Time as “an important black voice on campus” and “a form of community building.”[8][9]

Touré began his career as a music journalist, contributing articles to Rolling Stone,[10][11][2][12]The New Yorker,[volume & issue needed]The New York Times Magazine,[volume & issue needed]Playboy,[volume & issue needed]The Village Voice,[volume & issue needed]Vibe,[volume & issue needed] and Essence magazine.[volume & issue needed]

His Rolling Stone article about Dale Earnhardt Jr., “Kurt is My Co-Pilot”, was included in The Best American Sports Writing 2001.[12][13]

Touré has written five books, including Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness?, a collection of interviews, and I Would Die 4 U: Why Prince Became an Icon, a Prince biography.

Now tell me again…Whom is the “mediocrity” here?

 
8 Comments

Posted by on January 11, 2014 in Black Conservatives

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Foreign Adoption of American Children

Usually people think of Americans adopting children from other parts of the world. Increasingly…

It’s the other way around.

Seventy Dutch families who adopted U.S. kids gather for an annual Fathers Day picnic in June. The majority of the children being adopted are African American.

Overseas adoptions rise — for black American children

 Elisa van Meurs grew up with a Polish au pair, speaks fluent Dutch and English and loves horseback riding — her favorite horse is called Kiki but she also rides Pippi Longstocking, James Bond, and Robin Hood.

She plays tennis and ice hockey, and in the summer likes visiting her grandmother in the Swiss Alps.

“It’s really nice to go there because you can walk in the mountains and you can mountain bike … you can see Edelweiss sometimes,” said the 13-year-old, referring to the famous mountain flower that blooms above the tree line.

It’s a privileged life unlike that of her birth mother, a woman of African American descent from Indianapolis who had her first child at age 15. Her American family is “really nice but they don’t have a lot of money to do stuff,” said Elisa, who met her birth mother, and two siblings in 2011. “They were not so rich.”

Elisa van Meurs with her adoptive parents Bart and Heleene van Meurs on vacation in Switzerland.

While the number of international adoptions is plummeting — largely over questions surrounding the origin of children put up for adoption in developing countries — there is one nation from which parents abroad can adopt a healthy infant in a relatively short time whose family history and medical background is unclouded by doubt: The United States.

“I thought it was so strange. I’m here in Holland and they’re telling me I can get a baby” from the U.S., recalled Elisa’s father, Bart van Meurs, who originally planned to adopt from China or Colombia but held little hope of receiving an infant. “This can’t be true.” But less than 18 months later, van Meurs and his wife Heleene were at an Indiana hospital holding four-day-old Elisa.

While the typical tale of international adoption is U.S. families adopting a child from abroad, foreign families like the van Meurs adopt scores of U.S. children each year. The numbers are far lower than the thousands of overseas children adopted each year by U.S. families, but over the past decade the number of U.S. children adopted by foreign parents has been steadily rising — and almost all of the children are of African American descent like Elisa, say attorneys who facilitate international adoptions.

U.S. laws that allow birth mothers to choose the adoptive family of their children feed that growth, as some prefer to see their kids grow up in an exotic overseas locale rather than the U.S., experts say.

“A family from Indiana might talk about taking their child on vacation to Florida, to Disneyworld. A Dutch family talks about taking their child on vacation to the south of France or the Alps,” said Steven Kirsh of Kirsh & Kirsh, an Indianapolis law firm that has helped place hundreds of children with families in Europe.

Escape from racism

When Susan, a Florida resident, chose to place her son for adoption in 2006, the social worker gave her three binders with information about three prospective families. But she only needed to see the first binder of a couple from the Netherlands to make her decision. “If my mother had lived, she’d look just like (the prospective Dutch mother),” recalled the 37 year old, who asked that her last name not be used. Her own mother died when she was two months old.

Susan also wanted her son to grow up far away from the life she knew. She was a 30-year-old prostitute addicted to crack beginning a prison sentence when she learned she was pregnant. She did not know whether the child’s father was a man who raped her “for hours” or a drug dealer whom she “had done something with” one time, she said. But both men were African American, and she believed the child would face discrimination growing up in the United States.

“There’s too much prejudice over here. The white people are going to hate him because he’s half black, and the majority of black people are going to hate on him because he’s half white,” said Susan, who is Caucasian. “And then he’ll have to do extra things to prove what kind of a Negro he is, and extra things to prove what kind of a honky he is and I don’t want that. I did not want that for my kid.”

Even her own daughter, then aged 11, said “she would never accept that n***** child.”

Susan is not alone, says Adam Pertman, Executive Director of the Donaldson Adoption Institute and author of “Adoption Nation.” Many birth mothers have a perception that their black or mixed-race children will not face the same race issues in the Netherlands as in the United States.

“In the United States, as much as Americans want to believe it’s not true, we are still a country where there is a least some degree of racial prejudice. The birth mothers’ perception of Holland, in particular, was that the same was not true in Holland. There’s that feeling that maybe we can escape those issues if (the child is) somewhere else.”

This past June on Father’s Day, about 70 Dutch families who have adopted children from the U.S. gathered at a park outside Amsterdam. The picnic is a time for the children to celebrate their American heritage: “The kids are dressed with a red, white and blue beret in her hair, if it’s a girl, (or) they’re wearing New York Yankees t-shirts,” said Michael Goldstein, a New York attorney who facilitated the adoptions of the picnic attendees.

Among the families were Marielle van den Biggelaar, a stay-at-home mom and her husband, Marnix, a sales manager for a women’s clothing brand, who adopted their two children, Eva, four, and two-year-old Norbert as babies from Florida and New York, respectively. “For the kids it’s really important to see that they’re not alone and that all these kids have the same history, and they’re all adopted and they’re all from the same country,” Marielle said.

“It’s really nice to see them all together and to talk to each other about experiences — with their hair and with their skin — and they’re all the same people with the same mindset, so it’s really fun for the kids and for us, as well.”

The couple encourages their children to embrace their American origins, celebrating Thanksgiving each year with other families who adopted children from the United States. “We try to tell them about their culture and about their background,” said Marielle, who decided to adopt after years of unsuccessful fertility treatment. “We would love them to (start speaking) English when they’re really young because if they want to go back (to America) and if they want to see where they’re born, it would be nice if they can speak to … their parents if they are going to meet them.”

Their children stand out in Het Gooi, a village about 30 miles (50 kilometers) from Amsterdam. “They’re famous here, where we live, because it’s a really white society,” Marielle said…. (more)

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 17, 2013 in The Post-Racial Life

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Un-Hyphenate Me! Some Object to African American Label

One of the major changes brought about by Civil Rights was the right of self determination – the ability to decide what to call yourselves.

Some blacks insist: ‘I’m not African-American’

The labels used to describe Americans of African descent mark the movement of a people from the slave house to the White House. Today, many are resisting this progression by holding on to a name from the past: “black.”

For this group — some descended from U.S. slaves, some immigrants with a separate history — “African-American” is not the sign of progress hailed when the term was popularized in the late 1980s. Instead, it’s a misleading connection to a distant culture.

The debate has waxed and waned since African-American went mainstream, and gained new significance after the son of a black Kenyan and a white American moved into the White House. President Barack Obama’s identity has been contested from all sides, renewing questions that have followed millions of darker Americans:

What are you? Where are you from? And how do you fit into this country?

“I prefer to be called black,” said Shawn Smith, an accountant from Houston. “How I really feel is, I’m American.”

“I don’t like African-American. It denotes something else to me than who I am,” said Smith, whose parents are from Mississippi and North Carolina. “I can’t recall any of them telling me anything about Africa. They told me a whole lot about where they grew up in Macomb County and Shelby, N.C.”

Gibre George, an entrepreneur from Miami, started a Facebook page called “Don’t Call Me African-American” on a whim. It now has about 300 “likes.”

“We respect our African heritage, but that term is not really us,” George said. “We’re several generations down the line. If anyone were to ship us back to Africa, we’d be like fish out of water.”

“It just doesn’t sit well with a younger generation of black people,” continued George, who is 38. “Africa was a long time ago. Are we always going to be tethered to Africa? Spiritually I’m American. When the war starts, I’m fighting for America.”

Joan Morgan, a writer born in Jamaica who moved to New York City as a girl, remembers the first time she publicly corrected someone about the term: at a book signing, when she was introduced as African-American and her family members in the front rows were appalled and hurt.

“That act of calling me African-American completely erased their history and the sacrifice and contributions it took to make me an author,” said Morgan, a longtime U.S. citizen who calls herself Black-Caribbean American. (Some insist Black should be capitalized.)

She said people struggle with the fact that black people have multiple ethnicities because it challenges America’s original black-white classifications. In her view, forcing everyone into a name meant for descendants of American slaves distorts the nature of the contributions of immigrants like her black countrymen Marcus Garvey and Claude McKay.

Morgan acknowledges that her homeland of Jamaica is populated by the descendants of African slaves. “But I am not African, and Africans are not African-American,” she said.

In Latin, a forerunner of the English language, the color black is “niger.” In 1619, the first African captives in America were described as “negars,” which became the epithet still used by some today.

The Spanish word “negro” means black. That was the label applied by white Americans for centuries.

The word black also was given many pejorative connotations — a black mood, a blackened reputation, a black heart. “Colored” seemed better, until the civil rights movement insisted on Negro, with a capital N.

Then, in the 1960s, “black” came back — as an expression of pride, a strategy to defy oppression.

“Every time black had been mentioned since slavery, it was bad,” says Mary Frances Berry, a University of Pennsylvania history professor and former chair of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. Reclaiming the word “was a grass-roots move, and it was oppositional. It was like, `In your face.'”… (more)

 

 
2 Comments

Posted by on February 5, 2012 in Black History

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Cambridge University’s “first” Black Student

This is the story of an American, a black American who attended Cambridge University before the end of slavery in the United States.

What is interesting here is the phrase “first recorded black student”. It appears there were other black students at the University before Crummell, who were conveniently “forgotten” in the books. Considering that there is recent evidence of black folks being in England as early as the 13th Century, that is an interesting point to explore.

Cambridge University’s ‘first’ black student pioneer

Alexander CrummellThe story of Cambridge University’s first officially recorded black student is being told as part of the university’s Festival of Ideas.

Alexander Crummell was an American minister and the son of a freed slave who studied at Queens’ College, Cambridge, in the late 1840s.

While it appears he was not the first black student at Cambridge, he is the first for whom official records exist.

Cambridge lecturer Sarah Meek said he was seen as an “object of curiosity”.

She continued: “One of his servants, when she was dismissed by his wife Sarah, called the Crummells ‘black devils’, so they were obviously not immune to the kind of prejudice we might imagine.”

But at the same time he was a mature student who “was a respected, grown-up figure”.

During his university vacations he toured the country delivering anti-slavery lectures, and as a minister gave sermons in local churches.

Slavery had been abolished on British soil in the early 1800s, and in British colonies in the 1830s.

The anti-slavery campaigners Thomas Clarkson and William Wilberforce were both Cambridge graduates and the university was seen as an important centre for the abolitionist movement.

Writing in 1847 Crummell said: “Perhaps no seat of learning in the world… has done more for human liberty and human well-being than this institution.”

Crummell grew up in New York. His father was a freed slave and his mother a free-born woman from Long Island.

He attended one of the African Free Schools set up by New York abolitionists to educate the children of freed slaves.

But while slavery had been abolished in the northern United States, prejudice continued.

When Crummell and two of his New York classmates were awarded places at a secondary school in New Hampshire, they were driven away by an outraged local community.

Alexander CrummellHe continued his studies in New York, and was eventually ordained in the Episcopal church, which is connected with the Church of England.

It was this membership of the Episcopal church which would later allow him to study at Cambridge. If he had been a Methodist or Presbyterian, Jewish or Roman Catholic, he would not have been able to take up a place at Cambridge until 1871.

After graduating Crummell spent 20 years in the freed slave colony of Liberia before returning to New York.

Dr Meek said: “Back in the United States he was a leader and writer who influenced many subsequent writers.”

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 20, 2011 in Black History

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Make My Funk a P-Funk! The Mothership Lands at the Smithsonian

The Smithsonian Museum has added to it’s collection the iconic Parliament Funkadelic “Mothership”, to be included in the music section of the Museum of African American History.

Smithsonian acquires Parliament-Funkadelic Mothership

The funkiest UFO in the galaxy is about to land in Chocolate City.

The Mothership — the iconic stage prop made famous by legendary funk collective Parliament-Funkadelic — has been acquired by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture where it will help anchor a permanent music exhibition when the museum opens its doors in 2015.
“I’m about to cry!” Parliament-Funkadelic frontman George Clinton said over the phone from his home in Tallahassee on Wednesday. “They’re taking the Mothership! They’re shipping it out! . . . But I’m glad it’s going to have a nice home there.”

It isn’t the original Mothership. This 1,200-pound aluminum spacecraft was built in the mid-’90s — an indistinguishable replica, Clinton says, of the smoke-spewing stage prop he first introduced to slack-jawed funk fans in 1976.

But by 1982, Parliament-Funkadelic’s towering debts forced the group’s Washington-based management company to trash the Mothership in a Prince George’s County scrap yard. And what happened next has become the stuff of myth. Was it stolen? Did it burn in a fire? Is it still floating around somewhere in the cosmos?

An April 2010 Washington Post story about the Mothership’s disappearance sent the Smithsonian searching for it. Kevin Strait, project historian for the museum, didn’t get very far. “All signs pointed to the fact that we weren’t going to find the original,” Strait said. “So that’s when we essentially put our attentions toward the new one.”

Strait contacted Clinton’s management, and the bandleader eventually decided to donate the piece. The ship has been picked up from Clinton’s Tallahassee recording studio and is scheduled to arrive at a Smithsonian storage facility in suburban Maryland at noon on Thursday.

 
3 Comments

Posted by on May 19, 2011 in Music, From Way Back When to Now

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Ebonics Translator Jobs!

Damn, I know the slang in the city moves pretty fast – but this is amazing! A problem I can see they are going to have immediately is regionalization. The Gangstas in Atlanta don’t speak the same language as the Gangstas in New York…

It don’t mean a thang if it ain’t got that twang!

Ain’t it funny after all these years of trying to get young urban folks to speak the English Language…

Now they got a career speaking “Ghetto”?

Yo' Dawg!

Justice Department Seeks Ebonics Experts

The Department of Justice is seeking to hire linguists fluent in Ebonics to help monitor, translate, and transcribe the secretly recorded conversations of subjects of narcotics investigations, according to federal records.

A maximum of nine Ebonics experts will work with the Drug Enforcement Administration’s Atlanta field division, where the linguists, after obtaining a “DEA Sensitive” security clearance, will help investigators decipher the results of “telephonic monitoring of court ordered nonconsensual intercepts, consensual listening devices, and other media”

The DEA’s need for full-time linguists specializing in Ebonics is detailed in bid documents related to the agency’s mid-May issuance of a request for proposal (RFP) covering the provision of as many as 2100 linguists for the drug agency’s various field offices. Answers to the proposal were due from contractors on July 29.

In contract documents, which are excerpted here, Ebonics is listed among 114 languages for which prospective contractors must be able to provide linguists. The 114 languages are divided between “common languages” and “exotic languages.” Ebonics is listed as a “common language” spoken solely in the United States.

Ebonics has widely been described as a nonstandard variant of English spoken largely by African Americans. John R. Rickford, a Stanford University professor of linguistics, has described it as “Black English” and noted that “Ebonics pronunciation includes features like the omission of the final consonant in words like ‘past’ (pas’ ) and ‘hand’ (han’), the pronunciation of the th in ‘bath’ as t (bat) or f (baf), and the pronunciation of the vowel in words like ‘my’ and ‘ride’ as a long ah (mah, rahd).”

Detractors reject the notion that Ebonics is a dialect, instead considering it a bastardization of the English language.

The Department of Justice RFP does not, of course, address questions of vernacular, dialect, or linguistic merit. It simply sought proposals covering the award of separate linguist contracts for seven DEA regions. The agency spends about $70 million annually on linguistic service programs, according to contract records.

In addition to the nine Ebonics experts, the DEA’s Atlanta office also requires linguists for eight other languages, including Spanish (144 linguists needed); Vietnamese (12); Korean (9); Farsi (9); and Jamaican patois (4). The Atlanta field division, one of the DEA’s busiest, is the only office seeking linguists well-versed in Ebonics. Overall, the “majority of DEA’s language requirements will be for Spanish originating in Central and South America and the Caribbean,” according to one contract document.

The Department of Justice RFP includes a detailed description of the crucial role a linguist can play in narcotics investigations. They are responsible for listening to “oral intercepts in English and foreign languages,” from which they provide verbal and typed summaries. “Subsequently, all pertinent calls identified by the supervising law enforcement officer will be transcribed verbatim in the required federal or state format,” the RFP notes.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on August 23, 2010 in Black History, Nawwwwww!

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Conservatives New War Against Black Folks

One of the popular screeds among a sect of the conservative hegemony, is that the name of the NAACP is at issue because of the “Colored Peoples”. One needs to ask if one is to use this literal saw, if the Daughters of the American Revolution, and Sons of Confederate Veterans might not also be misnomered. Since there quite simply aren’t any daughters of American Revolutionaries or sons of Confederates alive today. To be precise, might not that be the Great-Great-great-great-Gandaughters of the American Revolution, and Great-Great-Great-Grandsons of the Confederacy?

I mean, like the term x-American, “hyphenated Americans” only became an issue and distasteful AFTER black folks claimed the term African-American to conservatives. Nary a peep about the hundreds of German-American, Irish-American, Italian-American, Polish-American etc. organizations which span the country. But African-American? Wow – to a certain racially misguided sect of conservatives – “Dem’s fighting words!”

Amazing is Glenn beck’s “discovery” that there actually is a black history in America. I suppose he believed prior to that point A-A’s appeared magically sometime between the Brown decision, and King’s 1963 March on Washington. Yeah I know – the great alien “motherships” converged over every city in America, and unlike the Movie “Independence Day”…

Instead of raining sown destruction on every city and metropolis, rained down freshly minted black folks to destroy the picture perfect urban havens!

It would seem that the “Culture Wars” promulgated by social conservatives have devolved into the war on black folks (as well as Hispanics)…

By the not so social conservatives.

Next up is the use of “Avatars”, in this case black conservatives – in this case attacking “Lift Every Voice and Sing”

Professor at historically black college questions ‘black national anthem’

“Lift Every Voice and Sing” is an uplifting spiritual, one that’s often heard in churches and popularly recognized as the black national anthem. Timothy Askew grew up with its rhythms, but now the song holds a contentious place in his mind.

“I love the song,” said Askew, an associate professor of English at Clark Atlanta University, a historically black college. “But it’s not the song that is the problem. It’s the label of the song as a ‘black national anthem’ that creates a lot of confusion and tension.”

The song and its message of struggle and hope have long been attached to the African-American community. It lives on as a religious hymn for several protestant and African-American denominations and was quoted by the Rev. Joseph E. Lowery at Barack Obama’s presidential inauguration.

After studying the music and lyrics of the song and its history for more than two decades, Askew decided the song was intentionally written with no specific reference to any race or ethnicity. Read the rest of this entry »

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Actress Says “Biracial” is Offensive

Hat tip – NewsOne

Paula Patton

Actress Paula Patton Says The Term “Biracial” Is Offensive

In a recent interview with Women’s Health magazine, actress Paula Patton spoke about her mixed background and her identity, She told them:

I find (the term) biracial offensive, it’s a way for people to separate themselves from African-Americans, a way of saying I’m better than that. I’m Black because that’s the way the worlds sees me. People aren’t calling Obama biracial. Most people think there’s a Black president.

 
8 Comments

Posted by on March 4, 2010 in The Post-Racial Life

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Glenn Beck… Again

Obviously Beck is more comfortable with the term “Nigras”…

 
2 Comments

Posted by on January 9, 2010 in Faux News

 

Tags: , , , ,

Four of 32 US Rhodes Scholars for 2010 Are African American

Four African-Americans among Rhodes Scholars

The Graduate, a print by Ernie Barnes. Ernie Barnes Prints may be purchased at It's a Black Thang.

Four African-American undergraduates have won Rhodes Scholarships and will travel to Oxford University for study, according to a BlackAmericaWeb.com report.

Named after South African mining magnate Cecil John Rhodes, the prestigious $50,000 scholarships were established in 1903 and are awarded to students who often become leaders in their fields.

This year’s African-American Rhodes scholars are Andre McCall from Truman State University, Ugwechi Amada from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Darryl Finkton and Jean Junior from Harvard.

The four will be among 32 international Rhodes Scholars who will travel to Oxford next fall. Also attending the famed English school will be Black students from Africa and the Caribbean and students of color from India, New Zealand, Australia, Canada and Germany.


Information about the Rhodes Scholar Program here.

Four African-Americans among Rhodes Scholars

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 3, 2009 in News, The Post-Racial Life

 

Tags: , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: