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BLM Protest Growing as HS Kids Follow Kaepernick

This is beginning to spread like wildfire…

Entire High School Football Team Kneels During National Anthem

“We haven’t seen this level of athlete activism in nearly half a century. This is a movement,” one expert said.

A San Francisco high school football team took a knee during the national anthem on Saturday to protest racial injustice, following in the footsteps of 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

All players ― Latino, white, Asian and black ― knelt before the game, the San Francisco Chronicle reported Thursday.

“This is for helping everybody else in the world to understand that black people and people of color are going though difficulties and they need help,” 17-year-old Mission High School quarterback Niamey Harris reportedly told his teammates prior to kickoff. “It’s not going to take care of itself.”

Harris said his team would also kneel for a game on Friday.

Though some are trying to dilute and silence the protest Kaepernick started, it’s refreshing to see how people across the sports world ― including high schoolers ― have joined him.

On Monday, Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) accused Kaepernick of “activism sympathetic to ISIS.” It’s unclear whether the lawmaker also thinks the students at Mission High School are terrorists.

In any case, Harris and the boys at Mission have a slew of local and national athletes behind them. NFL teams from the Seattle Seahawks to the Miami Dolphins have knelt, stood arm-in-arm or raised their fists in solidarity. Three black volleyball players from West Virginia University Tech knelt before a game. Professional soccer player Megan Rapinoe joined in (though U.S. Soccer has aired its frustrationwith her protest). The list goes on.

These athletes haven’t just started a discussion ― they’ve inspired action. The 49ers announced plans to donate $1 million to charities focused on racial issues after Kaepernick pledged $1 million of his own money to underserved communities. Denver Broncos linebacker Brandon Marshall pledged $300 for every tackle he makes to local organizations “that benefit the Denver community and others through the services, awareness and funds they provide for these critical social issues.”

And their advocacy shows no signs of stopping.

“Throughout the nation, athletes on different levels are finding their voice and recognizing that they have a platform,” Jeremi Duru, a professor of sports law at American University’s law school in Washington, told the Chronicle. “We haven’t seen this level of athlete activism in nearly half a century. This is a movement.”

 
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Posted by on September 16, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter, Orange Jumsuit Politicians

 

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Usher and Harry Belafonte Talk Activism

The Revolution’s growing soundtrack…

Usher And Harry Belafonte Talk Activism In Joint Appearance

As he considered his growing commitment to activism, Usher only needed to look at the man seated next to him, Harry Belafonte, to know how much more he could give.

“Unfortunately, no matter what I say I’m never going to be able to upstage (Belafonte),” the million-selling musician joked during a weekend appearance at the 92nd Street Y in Manhattan.

In an hourlong conversation moderated by Soledad O’Brien, the 37-year-old Usher and 88-year-old Belafonte related with obvious warmth to each other as fellow artists, activists and celebrities and as elder statesman and protege.

Usher called Belafonte a hero, mentor and father figure. And Belafonte spoke far more positively about young black celebrities than he did two years ago when he chastised Jay Z, Beyonce and others for turning “their back on social responsibility.”

At the 92nd Street Y, Jay Z was in the audience nodding his head as Belafonte praised him, Usher and Common for renewing a commitment to change after a “very me” generation immediately following the civil rights era.

“I’m glad I lived long enough to see this emergence,” he said.

Usher has a new single out, “Chains,” which protests racism and police violence. “Chains” features cameos by Nas and Bibi Bourelly, and an interactive video that stops playing if you turn away from the images of Michael Brown, Eric Garner and other black men who were killed recently. The video was made with the assistance of Belafonte and his nonprofit organization www.sankofa.org, which supports social engagement by artists.

“This conversation comes at a time when I think it’s a necessity for us as artists to use our platforms in a significant way,” Usher said, adding that Belafonte and his peers “used everything they’ve got, or they had, in order for us to have that platform.”

Speaking before an admiring, multigenerational crowd that often called out praise and encouragement, Belafonte assumed the role of teacher, summarizing the history of black resilience dating back to slavery and defining the power of art as a way to slow “the rush to the bank.” He has criticized President Barack Obama in the past as too cautious and at the 92nd Street Y ridiculed Obama’s campaign slogan “Yes We Can.”…Read the rest Here

 

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The REAL Black Panthers

A lot of young folks nowdays don’t really understand what the Black Panthers were – and what they really stood for.

There is even an imitation “Panther Party” of about 10 whack jobs who have captured conservative media imagination – and not much else. According to conservatives the appearance of two of these guys on the street outside of a polling place in 2008 constituted “voter fraud” and was directly responsible for a black man being elected President. In a conservative world where 1 black person on a street corner is “trouble”, 2 is a “conspiracy”, and 3 is a “riot” – the emergence of half a dozen black “militants” is cause for 24×7 wall-to-wall fearmongering. “The Nigras is out to get ya!”

Like a lot of the folks involved in the 60’s struggles, the author of this piece evolved. Jamal Joseph is now a Professor – but he maintains his activism.

Black Panthers, Guns and Star Trek

I was 15 years old when I walked into a Black Panther office and asked for a gun so I could kill a white man.

It was 1968, Dr. King had been murdered. Ghettoes across America were going up in riots and flames and I was a fatherless, angry man child who had been called “nigger” and smacked around by white cops a few too many times.

I was an honor student, a choir boy and a member of the N.A.A.C.P. youth council. My adoptive grandmother, “Noonie”, did her best as a single parent to instill her Baptist Church rooted values of “love they neighbor.” I dreamed of college, becoming a lawyer or in moments of liberated imagination a star ship commander like Captain Kirk from my favorite TV show Star Trek.

I worked part time as a stock and delivery boy at the supermarket so that Noonie wouldn’t have to give me allowance from her tight income that was a combination of social security and part time housekeeping work. I would sweep, mop and vacuum so that Noonie would not have to do anymore bending or scrubbing when she pulled her tired, body up the stairs to our second floor apartment.

jamal josephNoonie and I were close. I loved and respected her. But she was 70 and I was 15 — and the hip, cool path to manhood was on the streets. The Bronx and Harlem street corners I passed and sometimes hung out on had gangs, drugs, craps games, fights, hustlers, foxy ladies and patrolling cops that had to be eluded even when you were doing no wrong. The teens and men who held court there were living examples of how to walk, talk, swagger and fight your way into the manhood ranking system of being a “cool”, “bad” or “crazy dude” — which was highest honor.

The corners also had “warrior prophets” who talked about Black pride, progress and revolution. Some would be respected “bad” and “crazy” dudes who had gone to prison or to the Vietnam War and came back with something they called “Black Consciousness.” They critiqued drugs, hustling and violence as tools of oppression. They not only gave the corner contrast — they gave it context, and I was fascinated!

The evening news was filled with images of civil rights marchers and anti war protestors being beaten and tear gassed by Cops and National Guard Troops. Black Militant leaders like H.Rap Brown would appear on the news urging armed self defense and revolution. The Afros, dashikis and denim jackets the militants wore became the style of the day from schools to the street corners. We wore our Afros and dashikis to church, marches and N.A.A.C.P. meetings. The elders frowned but tolerated us with memories of the “wild styles” they wore when they were young. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on June 20, 2012 in Giant Negros

 

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