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Category Archives: The Post-Racial Life

Racists Anonymous Meetings…

No joke. A Church in North Carolina has started weekly group meetings.

North Carolina Church Holding Weekly Racists Anonymous Meetings

A church in North Carolina is taking 12 steps towards helping to improve America’s racial divide.

Every Wednesday, Trinity United Church of Christ in Concord hosts a Racists Anonymous (RA) meeting.

Church minister, Rev. Nathan King told WCNC TV that RA is meant to “deal with the racism within ourselves and to eliminate the racism within ourselves.”

King said the group was inspired by the number of high-profile police shootings in recent years as well as the Charleston church shooting in June 2015, where a white gunman killed nine black parishioners.

“It seemed like every week we were coming into worship and we were doing another prayer because someone had been killed in the street,” King told the station.

Sick of the shootings and racial unrest, King added that he wanted to do more than pray.

The group uses a modified version of the 12-step program pioneered by Alcoholics Anonymous, according to a recent Facebook post

A group devoted to helping people overcome personal racism might seem strange to some, but not King who told WCNC TV:

“It may not be the first thing you want to talk about the table at the Thanksgiving dinner with your family, but those conversations are going to be more common going forward.”

 
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Posted by on August 26, 2016 in The Post-Racial Life

 

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Marvel Replaces Iron Man with Ironheart…A Black Woman

Meet the newest Marvel character – IronHeart. She is scheduled to replace Iron Man.

Image result for Ironheart

Last month, Marvel revealed that Tony Stark would be passing on the Iron Man mantle to Riri Williams — a 15-year-old genius and the first young black woman to wear the famous armor. As we suspected at the time, Williams won’t be keeping the Iron Man name, and now, as reported by Wired, we know her chosen moniker: Ironheart.

Williams was first introduced to Marvel readers in Invincible Iron Man #9 back in May, when she creates her own Iron Man suit in her dorm room at MIT and gets kicked out of school for her trouble. Wired reports that Williams will get a proper introduction with the first issue of the next Invincible Iron Man volume coming out this fall, with Stark officially endorsing her new superhero role.

 
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Posted by on August 26, 2016 in The Post-Racial Life

 

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Homeschooling As a Response to Institutional School Racism

Used to be that most Home Schoolers did so for religious reasons.

With the reports of the disciplinary actions against black students,  the school to jail pipeline, and the failure of Charter Schools, more and more parents with the wherewithal are deciding to Home School.

Why more black parents are home-schooling their kids

While some parents cite religious and moral reasons, others say they are keeping their kids out of public schools to protect them from school-related racism.

 

Nikita Bush comes from a family of public school teachers: Her mom, aunts, uncles – nearly all of them have been involved in public education at some level.

But her own teaching career ended, she says, “in heartbreak” when she had to make a decision about where her own child would go to school.

After being reprimanded repeatedly for folding Afro-centric education into her Atlanta classroom, she left. Fifteen years and six children later, Ms. Bush leads a growing homeschooling co-op near Atlanta’s historic West End neighborhood.

Despite the promises of the civil rights movement, “people are starting to realize that public education in America was designed for the masses of poor, and its intent has been to trap poor people into being workers and servants. If you don’t want that for your children, then you look for something else,” she says. To her, the biggest flaw in public education is a lack of character education, an “absence of a moral binding,” that contributes to low expectations – and lower outcomes for children of color.

Ms. Bush is part of a burgeoning movement of African-American parents done waiting for public schools to get better. The numbers of black parents choosing to home-school their children has doubled in a little over a decade – about 220,000 black school-aged children are being homeschooled – up from estimates of 103,000 in 2003, according to the National Home Research Institute (NHERI).

“Moms and dads are saying, ‘We just want what’s best for our children,’ ” says Brian Ray, who founded NHERI and has written a paper on black home-schooling parents and how their children perform academically. “They’ve been told for 20, 30, 40 years that public schools will get better, they’ll get better for black kids, but … black kids are still at the bottom of the totem poll in terms of academic achievement… and black families know it.”

The reasons black parents cite for home-schooling their children cover a wide range. Some sound similar to the  homeschooling movement as a whole: religious beliefs, a desire to shelter children from an increasingly crass or materialistic society, a conviction that they are best-suited to teach their kids the values they need to live a fulfilling life.

But other parents cite incidents of racial bullying, studies showing that black students are less likely to be recommended for gifted and advanced classes, and multiple studies showing that African-American children – especially boys – are disproportionately likely to be suspended or arrested.

In short, in order to protect their children from school-related racism, more black parents are keeping their kids out of school entirely, writes Ama Mazama, a professor of African American Studies at Temple University in Philadelphia who has written extensively on home-schooling. She has dubbed the movement “racial protectionism.”

On academic performance, home-schooled students in his study scored between 23 and 42 percentile points above their public school counterparts in math, reading, and English, says Dr. Ray of NHERI. But he and others stress that research is nascent and more comprehensive studies need to be conducted before broader conclusions can be drawn. Ray’s study looked at 81 home-schooled students, for example.

Interestingly, given one common concern about home-schooled students not getting needed socialization with peers, the students in his study scored above average “on measures of social, emotional, and psychological development.”

Georgia’s twist on home-schooling

In most states, home-schooling parents tend to be dual-parent and middle- or upper-income, according to Ray’s research, enabling one parent to stay home and teach the kids.

But Georgia is different, says Cheryl Fields-Smith, a professor of education at the University of Georgia. While most states prohibit homeschooling parents from teaching anybody except their own children, Georgia has no such restriction. That has given rise to co-ops, where, in essence, groups of parents serve as rotating teachers, based on their own skill sets, talents, and fortes.

Nikita Bush

That, Professor Fields-Smith says, has allowed single black moms to band together to give their children an education that they say better reflects their values and history – while still being able to work.

“Some of the most amazing inventions come forward out of a need,” says Queen Taese, a Lithonia, Ga., mom who has homeschooled her seven children. “And with the way public education is going, there was an inevitable need, especially for the black community, because less funds go to our schools and there are a lot less opportunities unless our children go outside our community.”…Read the Rest Here

 
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Posted by on August 25, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter, The Post-Racial Life

 

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BLM and Wichita Police Hold a Cookout

This is a big difference from what we see on the racist Faux News, where ex-cops are paid to berate the BLM Movement, call them murders and terrorists…

Never mind that many of the ex-cops Faux News pays to appear are ex-Cops because of their own criminal activities. Drag in a few paid Lawn Jockeys, and you have the universe of Fox News racism.

The Wichita Police took what I would call and “adult” way to approach things. Why not invite the BLM protesters to a cookout, where Cops and the community could sit down and hold an honest conversation. For a lot of black folks, especially in Urban areas, this provides an opportunity to meet and get to know local Police on a personal level – instead of when they have you pulled over for something. For Police, it is an opportunity to meet the ordinary folks who make up the majority of people in the community.

Black Lives Matter protesters have friendly cookout with Wichita police

When a group of Kansas police officers spotted members of the Black Lives Matter movement protesting near a highway last week, they didn’t try to put a stop to it.

Instead, the Wichita officers suggested holding a cookout, where members of the community and cops could gather for food, dance and an open discussion. The Black Lives Matter protesters happily agreed.

Now the city is being praised for its response — with many people suggesting communities across the country should follow their example.

Conlee Borchard, whose fiancé is in the Wichita Police Academy, said protesters stood in line on Sunday and waited patiently to ask officials, including Wichita Police Chief Gordon Ramsay, questions.

“They asked hard questions, such as, ‘What are you doing to make sure our officers are held accountable?’ ‘What do we do if we have a complaint against an officer?'” Borchard told CBS News.

Image result for BLM Wichita Police

When the Q&A ended, the dancing began, and Borchard captured an inspiring sight on camera. A video of an energetic officer doing the “Cha Cha Slide” with Wichita residents went viral with more than 14 million views on Facebook.

Some applauded the heartwarming video as a welcome alternative to the tensions escalating between communities and police across the U.S.

“Other states are rioting, and killing…Were eating BBQ and dancing with the police!” one Facebook user commented.

“So proud of our hometown for making a ‘slide’ in the right direction,” another replied.

Borchard said it was a productive event.Image result for BLM Wichita Police

“It felt like coming into the future,” she explained. “In such a short amount of time there was so much restoration. Everyone walked away with hope.”

In a Facebook Live video posted on Monday, Chief Ramsay thanked everyone for making the “First Steps Community Cookout” a success.

“I really want to thank those who came out and were a part of this; it can’t just be the police that make these changes,” Ramsay said in the video. “It takes two parties to make a healthy relationship.”

 
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Posted by on August 25, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter, The Post-Racial Life

 

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WATCH: Charles Blow humiliates Trump’s ‘diversity’ chair — ‘You are part of the bigotry’

Source: WATCH: Charles Blow humiliates Trump’s ‘diversity’ chair — ‘You are part of the bigotry’

 
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Posted by on August 23, 2016 in The Post-Racial Life

 

How Bad are Charter Schools?

John Oliver’s rant –

 
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Posted by on August 22, 2016 in American Genocide, The Post-Racial Life

 

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Too Black. Wilmore’s Demise

Knew when Wilmore made the speech at the National Press Club, and called President Obama “My N888ga”,

He was on the way out.

I borrowed something here from my friend Steve who owns Urban Profile, over at Urbanprofile.com. He has sold a line of T-Shirts with the logo “Too Black” for a while, and I think the message there sums up what made Comedy Central so uncomfortable with Wilmore. If you like the message, I suggest you go over and give Steve some business.

TOO BLACK

They take my kindness for. . . . . WEAKNESS.

They take my silence for. . . . . SPEECHLESS.

They consider my uniqueness. . . . . STRANGE.

They call my language. . . . . . SLANG.

They see my confidence as. . . . . CONCEIT.

They see my mistakes as. . . . . DEFEAT.

They consider my success. . . . . ACCIDENTAL.

They minimize my intelligence to. . . . . POTENTIAL.

My questions mean I am. . . . . UNAWARE.

My advancement is somehow. . . . . UNFAIR.

To voice concern is. . . . . DISCONTENTMENT.

Ifi I stand up for myself I am too. . . . . DEFENSIVE.

If I don’t trust them I am too. . . . . APPREHENSIVE.

I am defiant if I. . . . . SEPARATE.

I am fake if I. . . . . ASSIMILATE.

My character is constantly. . . . . UNDER ATTACK.

Pride for my race makes me. . . . . “TOO BLACK.”

No compromises, no regrets — Larry Wilmore and the price of “Keeping it 100″

A laser focus on uncomfortable topics is what made “The Nightly Show” so essential — and so ripe for “unblackening”

…“The Nightly Show,” in contrast, had a different mandate from the start, evident in the fact that it was originally titled “The Minority Report.” It was created by Jon Stewart to filter distinct and frequently intersectional viewpoints informed by race, class and gender into a late night talk show format.

Knowing this, African American viewers of a certain age, and with a long memory, may have guessed that Comedy Central’s latest unblackening would come around sooner or later. Perhaps not 12 weeks before the Presidential election — that’s particularly surprising, given the precarious status of the rest of network’s faux-news block right now. But anyone who watched “The Nightly Show” had to know that Wilmore couldn’t maintain the show’s socio-politically fearless viewpoint indefinitely.

In fairness, “The Nightly Show”’s cancellation had far less to do with the show’s high melanin quotient than colorblind Nielsen ratings data. Wilmore inherited the timeslot from “The Colbert Report,” which enjoyed an average audience of 1.7 million viewers before Stephen Colbert departed to take over for David Letterman at CBS.

After that, viewership for the first year of “The Nightly Show” fell to an average of 922,000 viewers. In 2016, the year-to-date average has hovered somewhere around 776,000 viewers per night.

One can easily list the reasons for this, starting with the fact that “The Nightly Show”’s ratings were never quite as robust following Stewart’s departure from “The Daily Show,” which gave the show a strong lead-in when it launched in January 2015, but has been experiencing its own set of ratings woes since Trevor Noah took over as host.

Both Noah and Wilmore had to contend with withering in the shadows of giants. But Wilmore’s unique challenge was to follow Colbert’s larger-than-life, right-skewering trickster — the goofball counterbalance to Stewart, the liberal viewer’s deeply rankled, brutally honest best friend.

If Comedy Central had conducted a chemistry test with Stewart and Colbert’s dynamic in mind, Colbert’s successor would have similarly offset Noah’s weaknesses. What they got in Wilmore, however, was a modern version of Ellis Haizlip with a bit of Tavis Smiley mixed in — an affable, well-informed figure doing his ablest to find punchlines within a never ending parade of stories about the police shootings of unarmed black men, the erosion of civil rights on a federal level and, among other items on the lighter menu of the world’s horrors, the unforgettable sliminess of Bill Cosby.

It’s not as if Wilmore wasn’t doing the job for which he was hired. In tapping Wilmore, previously known to Comedy Central viewers the Senior Black Correspondent for “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart,” Stewart was sending a message to the industry.

Under Stewart’s regime, “The Daily Show” achieved new ratings heights and became a go-to destination for politically-inclined news junkies. But it was also overwhelmingly Caucasian and male in its writers room, even if it gave us a cast of alums that included the fabulous Samantha Bee (who has gone on to carry on Stewart’s legacy as the host of TBS’s “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee”), Aasif Mandvi, Wyatt Cenac and Jessica Williams (who is developing her own show at Comedy Central), as well as Wilmore.

Building “The Nightly Show” around Wilmore, then, was Stewart’s way of highlighting viewpoints that aren’t typically represented in mainstream media. Wilmore didn’t shoulder that task alone: He made Robin Thede, an African American woman, the show’s head writer for 159 episodes. He elevated the profiles of brash, intellectual stand-up comedians Mike Yard and Rory Albanese, introduced audiences to Ricky Velez, and gave ample screen time to a variety of women of color, notably Holly Walker, Franchesca Ramsey and Grace Parra.

All of these contributors helped Wilmore deeply mine uncomfortable topics that other late night talk show hosts would gingerly touch upon — if they did so at all — before moving on to easy comedy veins. It’s simple for comedians to feast upon the ever-increasing number of gaffes committed by Donald Trump; he’s an orange Julius Caesar who gives all comers ample opportunity to punch up.

It is much, much more difficult to utilize the late night comedy format to call attention to absurdist acts of institutional bigotry and discrimination, police brutality, voter disenfranchisement and a wide array of other civil rights issues concerning not only African Americans, but the LGBTQ community, women, immigrants and refugees.

Wilmore used “The Nightly Show” forum to taking longer looks at relevant social topics, such as “The Nightly Show” episodes focusing on black fatherhood, or the systematic barriers black women face in the arenas of dating, employment and education. He also followed the Black Lives Matter movement closely as it developed and expanded, doing so consistently and without apology. The show’s catchphrase, “Keeping it 100,” became its credo — and possibly its downfall.

“The Nightly Show”’s laser focus on these topics likely led to its inability to attract and maintain audience levels on par with “The Daily Show” and “The Colbert Report.” The typical viewer doesn’t enthusiastically gravitate toward discussions about racism, sexism and homophobia. Certainly most late-night watchers aren’t comfortable absorbing those topics right before nodding off, even when they’re treated with a lighter touch….

 
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Posted by on August 17, 2016 in Giant Negros, The Post-Racial Life

 

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