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Category Archives: The New Jim Crow

Reports of Jim Crow’s demise are a bit premature…

Why Right Wingers Don’t Belong In Positions of Responsibility

It is a simple fact that you can’t punish your way out of a social,  or criminal situation.

If you could, there would be no crime in the world at all.

We have a situation in America where right wing types have reinstituted Debtors Prisons, and as the FBI Report on Ferguson, Missouri lays out, where the Judicial System is corrupted as a tool to drive racial punishment against the poor.

There are clowns like this Judge appointed every single day by the Chumph to our Federal Courts. This racist assh*le is probably on the Chumph’s short list.

“As a Mississippian with deep roots in this state that I love, I am deeply troubled by the many ways in which poor Mississippians, especially African Americans, are victimized by Mississippi’s legal system,” Johnson said. “We have litigated matters involving excessive bail, illegal jailing of misdemeanor offenders for unpaid fines and the refusal to provide poor criminal defendants with counsel, and now we see that not even the right to raise one’s children is beyond the reach of the injustice that befalls poor Mississippians.”

Mississippi judge resigns after barring mother from seeing her baby for 14 months over unpaid court fees

A Mississippi judge who barred a mother from seeing her newborn baby for 14 months because she hadn’t paid court-imposed fees has stepped down.

The Clarion-Ledger reports that Pearl Youth Court Judge John Shirley has resigned under pressure from local activists who decried his decision to impose a no-contact order on a resident of Jackson, Miss., who is identified in court documents only as “Mother A.”

The judge first issued the order after the woman and a friend, who were driving through the city of Pearl looking for work, were pulled over by a police officer who discovered both women had outstanding warrants for routine misdemeanor offenses. The police officer who made the arrest told the Mississippi Department of Human Services that the child who was in the car with the two women was “abandoned,” despite the fact that it was the officer’s own arrest that forced the child to be separated from the mother.

Judge Shirley awarded custody to the baby’s grandmother, while also blocking the mother from coming into contact with the child until she paid off court-imposed fees.

The Clarion-Ledger’s report does not say how much money the mother owed in court fees, however local legal justice advocates say that unpaid fees do not justify separating a mother from a four-month-old child for 14 months.

“As a civil rights lawyer in Mississippi, I am no stranger to injustice, but for a judge to prohibit an impoverished mother from having any contact with her baby until monetary payments are made is shocking and repugnant,” said Cliff Johnson, the director of the Roderick and Solange MacArthur Justice Center at the University of Mississippi School of Law. “Such orders are tantamount to judicial kidnapping.”

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How Black Americans See Discrimination

What percentage of black Americans believe racism and discrimination against black folks exists in America?

Pice a number between 1 and 100 and read on.

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How Black Americans See Discrimination

We asked black Americans whether they believe discrimination against black Americans exists in the U.S. today.

How many do you think responded “it exists”?

92%.

Of the 802 black Americans we asked, almost all said they believe discrimination against black Americans exists today.

One of the paradoxes of racial discrimination is the way it can remain obscured even to the people to whom it’s happening. Here’s an example: In an ambitious, novel studyconducted by the Urban Institute a few years ago, researchers sent actors with similar financial credentials to the same real estate or rental offices to ask about buying or renting a home or apartment. In the end, no matter where they were sent, the actors of color were shown fewer homes and offered fewer discounts on rent or mortgages than those who were white.Image result for black american poll experience with racism

The results even surprised some of the actors of color; they felt they had been treated politely — even warmly — by the very real estate agents who told them they had no properties available to show them but who then told the white actors something different. The full scope of the disparate treatment often becomes clear only in the aggregate, once the camera zooms out.

And yet obscured as the picture may be, black Americans take the existence of discrimination as a fact of life. That’s according to a new study conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, which asked black respondents how they felt about discrimination in their lives and in American society more broadly.

Almost all of the black people who responded — 92 percent — said they felt that discrimination against African-Americans exists in America today. At least half said they had personally experienced racial discrimination in being paid equally or promoted at work, when they applied for jobs or in their encounters with police.

Overall, African Americans report extensive experiences of discrimination, across a range of
situations. In the context of institutional forms of discrimination, half or more of African
Americans say they have personally been discriminated against because they are Black when
interacting with police (50%), when applying to jobs (56%), and when it comes to being paid
equally or considered for promotion (57%).

Additionally, 60% of African Americans say they or a family member have been unfairly
stopped or treated by the police because they are Black, and 45% say the court system has treated
them unfairly because they are Black. Blacks living in suburban areas are more likely than those
in urban areas to report being unfairly stopped or treated by police and being threatened or
harassed because they are Black.

In the context of individual discrimination, a majority of African Americans have personally
experienced racial slurs (51%) and people making negative assumptions or insensitive or
offensive comments about their race (52%). Four in ten African Americans say people have
acted afraid of them because of their race, and 42% have experienced racial violence. Higher
income Black Americans are more likely to report these experiences.

African Americans also report efforts to avoid potential discrimination or to minimize their
potential interactions with police. Nearly a third (31%) say they have avoided calling the police,
and 22% say they have avoided medical care, even when in need, both for fear of discrimination.
Similarly, 27% of Black Americans say they have avoided doing things they might normally,
such as using a car or participating in social events, to avoid potentially interacting with police

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But within that near-consensus, the respondents reported having different kinds of experiences with discrimination, which varied considerably depending on things like gender, age and where they lived.

Take, for example, the question of whether discrimination that was the result of individual bias was a bigger problem than discrimination embedded into laws and government. Among the folks who said that discrimination existed, exactly half of all respondents felt the discrimination that black people face from individual people was a bigger cause for concern. But younger people were more likely to say they felt that institutional discrimination was a bigger concern.

There was also a city-rural divide here, with people who lived in urban areas more likely to see this discrimination as driven by institutional factors as opposed to individual bias than those who lived in rural areas…Related image

There were some stark differences in the way people in different income brackets said they experienced discrimination. Just about 2 in 3 people who earned more than $75,000 a year said that someone has referred to them or black people with racial slurs; less than half of all people who made less than $25,000 said the same. The same trend was true when respondents were asked whether someone acted afraid of them because of their race: Fifty-five percent of people who made more than $75,000 a year or more said this was true, compared with 33 percent of those who made less than $25,000 a year….More

 

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White Folks is Discriminated Against Y’all!

In a victory of racist Fox News, the majority of white folks now see themselves as “victims” of racial oppression…

Even though only a small minority can provide any instance where they themselves have experienced discrimination, no matter how flimsy the accusation.

Of course, there is no statistical evidence to back this up in any credible study whatsoever.

More white-wing magic thinking.

The “Disadvantaged Majority”

Majority Of White Americans Believe White People Face Discrimination

But most said they haven’t personally experienced racial discrimination, according to a new poll.

majority of white Americans believe whites face discrimination, according to a new poll, but most said they’ve never personally experienced it.

Fifty-five percent of whites agreed that “discrimination against white people exists in the U.S. today,” according to the poll, released Tuesday by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

View image on Twitter

“If you apply for a job, they seem to give the blacks the first crack at it,” Ohio resident Tim Hershman, 68, a poll respondent, told NPR. “If you want any help from the government, if you’re white, you don’t get it. If you’re black, you get it.”

“It’s been going on for decades, and it’s been getting worse for whites,” Hershman added.

When prodded, however, Hershman was unable to provide an example of discrimination against him.

The same was true for most white Americans polled: Only 19 percent said they’d personally faced discrimination applying for a job; 13 percent in being considered for work pay or promotion; and 11 percent in applying for college. 

The poll showed that most Americans, including blacks, Latinos and LGBTQ individuals, believe their own group faces discrimination.

Ninety-two percent of African Americans said discrimination against blacks exists in America today. More than half said they’d personally experienced discrimination when applying for jobs (56 percent), and being paid equally or considered for promotion (57 percent). About 60 percent said they or a family member had been “unfairly stopped or treated by the police because they are black.”

Claims of discrimination against whites may be proliferating since Donald Trump’s rise to the presidency. Trump has appeared to at least tacitly support white supremacists. In August, The New York Times reported that his administration was redirecting “resources of the Justice Department’s civil rights division toward investigating and suing universities over affirmative action admissions policies deemed to discriminate against white applicants.”

Trump supporters are more likely than average Americans to believe that whites face “a lot of discrimination,” and are less likely to think that blacks and other minorities are highly discriminated against, according to a 2016 HuffPost/YouGov survey.

Forty-five percent of Trump voters said white people in the U.S. “face a lot of discrimination,” compared with 24 percent of all Americans. Only 22 percent of Trump voters said the same about black Americans.

 

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Uncle Ben’s Fried Rice – Congressional Hearings on Chumph Budget

Uncle Ben Carson had a tough day in Congress between the Chumph’s obscene Puerto Rico comments,  and the Chumph Budget cuts….

 

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Every Element of the “Justice” System is Racially Biased

Most minor crimes in the US are “Plea Bargained” instead of prosecuted. Typically defendants admit to crimes, even if they are not guilty, because they can’t afford to defend themselves is cout due to the expense of lawyers.

This means that at any time, possibly as much as half the people accused of crimes…Didn’t do a damn thing and are “convicted” solely on their ability to pay for a defense.

That situation can be exacerbated by the severity of the crime Prosecutors decide tot charge them with. What the defendant is charged with lies largely on the whim of the Prosecutor.

Meaning different people get charged vastly different things for the exact same crime.

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When Race Tips the Scales in Plea Bargaining

 

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Kaepernick Files Legal Grievance Against NFL

About time…There is now ample evidence of this happening.

I also expect the filing of a grievance by the NFL Players Union against the league.

 

 
 

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Women of Color Tell White Sisters – “What took you so long on Twitter!”

The feminist movement has a color line as well…

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Rose McGowan

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Leslie Jones

WOMEN OF COLOR HAVE BEEN COMPLAINING ABOUT TWITTER LONG BEFORE WHITE WOMEN

Thousands of women across Twitter boycotted the platform in solidarity with actress Rose McGowan on Friday, leaving many women of color with a troubling question: What took so long?

#WomenBoycottTwitter began trending Thursday night, when Twitter temporarily suspended McGowan’s account amid a string of tweets from the actress speaking out against her alleged rapist, Harvey Weinstein, and actor Ben Affleck, whom she told to “fuck off.” McGowan and other women argued the platform had been silencing a survivor of alleged sexual assault — so on Friday, women said they would abstain from Twitter.

But others, mostly women of color, asked where those women had been when Jemele Hill was suspended from ESPN for her tweets about President Donald Trump, or when alt-right provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos sicced his internet trolls on Leslie Jones.

“Calling white women allies to recognize conflict of #WomenBoycottTwitter for women of color who haven’t received support on similar issues,” director Ava DuVernay tweeted Thursday night.

“What happened with Rose McGowan being suspended was wrong,” writer and sociologist Eve Ewing added. “Unequivocally wrong. But if that’s what activated your awareness, I don’t especially trust you.”

Calling white women allies to recognize conflict of  for women of color who haven’t received support on similar issues.

Some women of color on the platform took advantage of an alternative to #WomenBoycottTwitter, using the hashtag #AmplifyWomen to uplift women and give their stories of sexual assault and trauma broader reach.

“As a queer WoC and a survivor of sexual assault, you’re not gonna shut me up,” wrote one Twitter user who used the hashtag. “You’re not gonna shut any of us up.”

Twitter did eventually restore McGowan’s account midday Thursday. The company claimed that it is “proud to empower and support the voices on our platform, especially those that speak truth to power.”

In the meantime, Twitter remains under fire for not suspending the account of President Donald Trump amid charges that he has violated the social media’s rules with his demeaning and insulting tweets.

Most recently, the president retweeted a GIF of him firing a golf ball at former rival Hillary Clinton, which some said advocated violence, a Twitter no-no.

 

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