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Category Archives: Music, From Way Back When to Now

Great finds around the WWW – with videos where possible

Pharrell Williams…”Freedom” and Prince …”Baltimore”

Enjoy the song – but check out the background and symbolism…

Prince’s song on Baltimore and the death of Freddy Gray…

 
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Posted by on July 23, 2015 in Music, From Way Back When to Now

 

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Man Records Entire Album in Apple Store

INcredible ingenuity!

 

He Made a Secret Album in an Apple Store

 

Prince Harvey needed to make an album. So after his computer crashed, he spent four months in an Apple store singing the entire thing into a display computer.

Standing in the middle of the Upper West Side’s Apple Store in Manhattan, 25-year-old artist and rapper Prince Harvey seemed at home, almost like he knew what was going to happen next.

“As soon as I jump on the table, they’re going to kick us out. So just keep taking pictures,” Prince says, as he puts on a bright silver, ankle-length trench coat and hops on the wooden display top closest to the entrance.

It only takes 10 seconds before he’s proven right. An employee shuffles over to us without missing a beat.

“All right, I told you already, chief: no pictures,” the employee says.

Harvey, now standing on Broadway after being asked to once again leave an Apple Store, pauses to consider his next move.

“I would take you to the SoHo store,” he says with a smile, “but security knows me there.”

Familiarity is an understatement. After a second computer failure left him without a means to record his album and no money to buy a replacement, Prince finished recording the vocals and backing instrumental tracks for his new album entirely in that one Apple Store.

Prince Harvey sang, hummed, and rapped into a display computer at the SoHo Apple Store every weekday for four consecutive months.

The album, after all, is called PHATASS—an acronym for Prince Harvey At The Apple Store: SoHo.

 

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Jimmy Ruffin

Another Motown great, Jimmy Ruffin – older brother of Temptations great, David Ruffin…

As I recall, Jimmy originally recorded “What Becomes of the Broken Hearted” which would be covered by several other Motown groups –

And, my personal favorite by him – “I’ve Passed This Way Before” –

Motown Singer Jimmy Ruffin Dead At Age 78

Jimmy Ruffin, the Motown singer whose hits include “What Becomes of the Brokenhearted” and “Hold on to My Love,” died Monday in a Las Vegas hospital. He was 78.

Philicia Ruffin and Jimmy Lee Ruffin Jr., the late singer’s children, confirmed Wednesday that Ruffin had died. There were no details about the cause of death.

Ruffin was the older brother of Temptations lead singer David Ruffin, who died in 1991 at age 50…

Jimmy Lee Ruffin was born on May 7, 1936, in Collinsville, Mississippi. He was signed to Berry Gordy’s Motown Records, and had a string of hits in the 1960s, including “What Becomes of the Brokenhearted,” which became a Top 10 pop hit.

He had continued success with songs such as “I’ve Passed This Way Before” and “Gonna Give Her All the Love I’ve Got,” but Ruffin marked a comeback in 1980 with his second Top 10 hit, “Hold on to My Love.” The song was produced by Robin Gibb, the Bee Gees member who died in 2012.

Ruffin worked with his brother David in the 1970s on the album, “I Am My Brother’s Keeper.”…

 

 

 
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Posted by on November 19, 2014 in Music, From Way Back When to Now

 

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Move Over, Adele – The Queen is in the Room

This from a to be released album by the 72 year old Queen of Soul. Re Re still has some chops, but you can only imagine what the 1967 version of her would have done.

I actually like both versions, Adele’s because it has a bit of a raw quality starting out, and Aretha’s because of the dynamic range.

Now, of course for comparison the Adele version –

 

 
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Posted by on October 6, 2014 in Music, From Way Back When to Now

 

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Q Sues Michael Jackson Estate

Quincy Jones ‘ musical direction took Michael Jackson from being a star to being an international superstar, Had there been no Q – the production quality of Jackson’s three biggest albums would have been different, and arguably less stellar.

So this one is a bit of a shocker.

Quincy Jones sues Michael Jackson’s estate

Quincy Jones sued Michael Jackson’s estate on Friday claiming he is owed millions in royalties and production fees on some of the superstar’s greatest hits.

Jones’ lawsuit seeks at least $10 million from the singer’s estate and Sony Music Entertainment, claiming the entities improperly re-edited songs to deprive him of royalties and production fees. The music has been used in the film “This Is It” and a pair of Cirque du Soleil shows based on the King of Pop’s songs, the lawsuit states.

Jones also claims that he should have received a producer’s credit on the music in “This Is It.” His lawsuit seeks an accounting of the estate’s profits from the works so that Jones can determine how much he is owed.

The producer worked with Jackson on three of his most popular solo albums, “Off the Wall,” ”Thriller” and “Bad.”

Jackson’s estate wrote in a statement that it was saddened by Jones’ lawsuit. “To the best of its knowledge, Mr. Jones has been appropriately compensated over approximately 35 years for his work with Michael,” the statement said.

An after-hours message left at Sony Music’s New York offices was not immediately returned.

Jackson’s hits “Billie Jean,” ”Thriller” and “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough” are among the songs Jones claims were re-edited to deprive him of royalties and his producer’s fee. Jones’ lawsuit states the producer’s contracts called for him to have the first opportunity to re-edit or alter the songs, in part to protect his reputation.

 

 
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Posted by on October 26, 2013 in Music, From Way Back When to Now

 

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What Fun! Welcome to Tokyo Olympics 2020 Promo

This one is fun!

 
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Posted by on October 11, 2013 in Music, From Way Back When to Now

 

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Hittin’ The Last Lick…Butch Warren – Bassist

If you are, or ever have been a fan of the great artists recording on Blue Note back in the 50’s and 60’s Jazz nadir… You have heard Butch Warren.

Starting as a bassist for Thelonious Monk in the late 50’s, Warren – a DC native, became the “house bassist” for Blue Note’s recording studio, and toured with many of the label’s greats.

Edward ‘Butch’ Warren, Washington-born bassist, dies at 74

Edward “Butch” Warren, a Washington-born bassist who performed on celebrated albums of the modern jazz era before vanishing almost completely from the music scene because of drug addiction and deteriorating mental health, died Oct. 5 at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring. He was 74.

The cause was lung cancer, said a daughter, Sharon Warren.

Mr. Warren, who reappeared in Washington clubs in recent years, was best known for the recordings he made from the late 1950s to the mid-1960s. He was discovered by trumpeter Kenny Dorham on a trip through the District and, within a matter of years, the 19-year-old Warren was working at the center of New York’s elite orbit of hard-bop jazz musicians.

As the house bass player for the Blue Note record label in New York, he helped set the pace and tone on first-rate albums by saxophonist Dexter Gordon, trumpeter Donald Byrd and pianists Herbie Hancock and Sonny Clark. He also toured the world with Thelonious Monk in 1963 and 1964 and was considered a promising disciple of the wildly innovative pianist and composer.

“Warren’s rich, loping bass is well suited to Monk’s rhythms if not his harmonic ideals,” Time magazine noted in a 1964 story about the band. “He is like a pony in pasture who traces his mother’s footsteps without stealing her grace.”

He left his mark on albums such as Hancock’s “Takin’ Off” (1962), Gordon’s “Go!” (1962), Jackie McLean’s “Vertigo” (1963), Dorham’s “Una Mas” (1963) and “Miles & Monk at Newport” (1964) with Miles Davis and Monk. Mr. Warren also wrote pieces included on several of the Blue Note albums, including “Eric Walks,” a tribute to his son, then a toddler taking his first steps.

Lean and lanky with an impassive face and an enduring attachment to the narrow lapels and thin ties popular among bop artists of the mid-century, Mr. Warren was for decades a mysterious, silent presence along the fringes of the Washington jazz scene.

After his return from New York in the mid-’60s, he was for a few years a regular in the house band on Channel 4’s morning talk show, “Today With Inga.” Then he largely disappeared, popping up from time to time at a club gig or at the Friday night jazz shows at Westminster Presbyterian Churchin Southwest Washington.

The Washington Post found Mr. Warren in 2006 in the locked-down psychiatric ward at Springfield Hospital Center , an institution 50 miles north of the District in Sykesville, Md. He had lost most of his teeth, and he seemed dazed and distracted. He had lost his apartment in a seniors’ facility in Silver Spring, lost his balance, lost his bass. “This is about the best place I’ve ever lived,” he told The Post.

The staff at the mental hospital knew him only as “Ed” until a worker on the ward got curious, Googled him, and discovered that the patient who kept asking for permission to play the piano in the recreation room was one of the lost bassists of the venerated Blue Note era.

Edward Rudolph Warren Jr., who was born on Aug. 9, 1939, grew up surrounded by music. His father was an electronics technician and a pianist who played at local clubs and opened his home to touring black musicians. His mother, Natalie, was for many years a typist at the CIA. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 7, 2013 in Music, From Way Back When to Now

 

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