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Category Archives: Black History

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The NFL Slave Rebellion and White Priviledge

This on Roland Martin’s NewsOne show, and especially the piece here by Sports Commentato Dale Hansen is really powerful…

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Rep. John Lewis on Trump Racism

Lewis lays it out as clear as a bell here.

Unfortunately, I don’t believe marching  in the streets and singing “We Shall Overcome” is going to do much this time around. We need to find much more direct ways to resist. Whether economic, or breaking the established systems through non-cooperation there needs to be a hard stop. I am certainly not advocating bomb throwing (yet) – but if Counselor Mueller fails to take this Piece of Shit out, or Congress politically refuses to react to the evidence…

Then it may well come to that.

 

 

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Fighting Fascism – How the Nazis Tailored Discriminated Against Jews Based on American Jim Crow

Fantastic bit of history here. The neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and alt-right of today aren’t any different than Hitler’s Nazis.

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Tuskeegee Airmen

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761st Tank Batallion

 

A brief history of black Americans fighting fascism — from WWII to Charlottesville

In July 1943, one month after a race riot shook Detroit, Vice President Henry Wallace spoke to a crowd of union workers and civic groups:

“We cannot fight to crush Nazi brutality abroad and condone race riots at home. Those who fan the fires of racial clashes for the purpose of making political capital here at home are taking the first step toward Nazism.”

The Pittsburgh Courier, a leading African-American newspaper at the time, praised Wallace for endorsing what they called the “Double V” campaign. The Double Victory campaign, launched by the Courier in 1942, became a rallying cry for black journalists, activists and citizens to secure both victory over fascism abroad during World War II and victory over racism at home.

There is a historical relationship between Nazism and white supremacy in the United States. Yet the recent resurgence of explicit racism, including the attack in Charlottesville, has been greeted by many with surprise. Just look at the #thisisnotwhoweare hashtag.

As a scholar of African-American history, I am troubled by the collective amnesia in U.S. politics and media around racism. It permeates daily interactions in communities across the country. This ignorance has consequences. When Americans celebrate the country’s victory in WWII, but forget that the U.S. armed forces were segregated, that the Red Cross segregated blood donors or that many black WWII veterans returned to the country only to be denied jobs or housing, it becomes all the more difficult to talk honestly about racism today.

Nazis and Jim Crow

As Adolf Hitler and the Nazi regime rose to power in the 1930s, black-run newspapers quickly recognized that the Third Reich saw the American system of race law as a model. Describing a plan to segregate Jews on German railways, the New York Amsterdam News wrote that Nazis were “taking a leaf from United States Jim Crow practices.”

The Chicago Defender noted that “the practice of jim-crowism has already been adopted by the Nazis.” A quote from the official newspaper of the SS, the Nazi paramilitary organization, on the origins of the railway ban stated:

“In the freest country in the world, where even the president rages against racial discrimination, no citizen of dark color is permitted to travel next to a white person, even if the white is employed as a sewer digger and the Negro is a world boxing champion or otherwise a national hero…[this] example shows us all how we have to solve the problem of traveling foreign Jews.”

In making connections between Germany and the United States, black journalists and activists cautioned that Nazi racial ideology was not solely a foreign problem. A New York Amsterdam News editorial argued in 1935:

“If the Swastika is an emblem of racial oppression, the Stars and Stripes are equally so. This country has consistently refused to recognize one-tenth of its population as an essential part of humanity…It has systematically encouraged the mass murder of these people through bestial mobs, through denial of economic opportunity, through terrorization.”

Victory at home

Image result for Double V CampaignWhen the United States entered WWII, African-Americans joined the fight to defeat fascism abroad. Meanwhile, the decades-long fight on the home front for equal access to employment, housing, education and voting rights continued.

These concerns prompted James G. Thompson, a 26-year-old from Wichita, Kansas, to write to the editors of the Pittsburgh Courier. His letter sparked the Double Victory campaign. Considering his service in the U.S. Army, which was racially segregated during WWII, Thompson wrote:

“Being an American of dark complexion and some 26 years, these questions flash through my mind: ‘Should I sacrifice my life to live half American?’ ‘Will things be better for the next generation in the peace to follow?’…‘Is the kind of America I know worth defending?’”

For Thompson and other African-Americans, defeating Nazi Germany and the Axis powers was only half the battle. Winning the war would be only a partial victory if the United States did not also overturn racial discrimination at home.

These ideals seemed particularly far away in the summer of 1943, when racial violence raged across the country. In addition to the riot in Detroit, there were more than 240 reports of interracial battles in cities and at military bases, including in Harlem, Los Angeles, Mobile, Philadelphia and Beaumont, Texas.

These events inspired Langston Hughes’ poem, “Beaumont to Detroit: 1943”:

“Looky here, America / What you done done / Let things drift / Until the riots come […] You tell me that hitler / Is a mighty bad man / I guess he took lessons from the ku klux klan […] I ask you this question / Cause I want to know / How long I got to fight / BOTH HITLER — AND JIM CROW.”Image result for Double V Campaign

The end of Hughes’ poem calls to mind the swastikas and Confederate flags that were prominently displayed in Charlottesville and at other white supremacist rallies. These symbols and ideologies have long and intertwined histories in the U.S.

The ConversationAdvocates of the Double Victory campaign understood that Nazism would not be completely vanquished until white supremacy was defeated everywhere. In linking fascism abroad and racism at home, the Double Victory campaign issued a challenge to America that remains unanswered.

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1 Comment

Posted by on August 22, 2017 in Black History, The New Jim Crow

 

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Trump Lawn Jockey Katrina Pierson – “So Happy About Slavery”

Why did even the Chumph administration dump this freak?

 

Katrina Pierson implodes on Fox: Slavery is an example of how ‘special and wonderful this country is’

Pro-Trump surrogate Katrina Pierson, whose historical illiteracy made her infamous during the 2016 presidential campaign, appeared on Fox & Friends Monday morning to talk about the history of the Civil War and the Confederacy.

Via Media Matters, Pierson made the case that Confederate statues shouldn’t be removed because they represent a vital part of America’s history — but she then took this argument a step further by saying that they represent a “good” part of U.S. history.

“It absolutely deserves a place, because bad history is still good history for this country,” Pierson said.

At this point, Fox & Friends guest Wendy Osefo interjected and asked Pierson if she really meant that a war to defend slavery was a positive highlight from America’s past.

“Slavery is good history?” Osefo asked.

“Considering where we are today… absolutely,” Pierson responded. “Think about this for a second. Where would we be today if not for that Civil War?”

At this point Osefo became incredulous.

“Where would we be without slavery?” she asked. “Are you serious? Do you hear what you’re saying?”

Pierson then said that teaching our children about the history of slavery was a good way of educating them about what makes America “special.”

“How would our children even know how special and how wonderful this country is that we can even be having this discussion today?” she asked.

“How special slavery is?” Osefo replied. “You know how many people died?”

 
2 Comments

Posted by on August 21, 2017 in Black Conservatives, Black History

 

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In Flash Move Baltimore Removes confederate Statues

Take ’em down.

Baltimore Removes Confederate Statues One Day After Voting On Issue

In an overnight operation, workers removed Baltimore’s high-profile statues linked to the Confederacy, using cranes and trucks to haul away monuments that honored Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson and Roger B. Taney, author of the Supreme Court’s Dred Scott opinion.

“It’s done,” Mayor Catherine Pugh said Wednesday, according to The Baltimore Sun. “They needed to come down. My concern is for the safety and security of our people. We moved as quickly as we could.”

The city took action as several local groups were preparing their own plans to yank down the statues, in much the same way a Confederate statue was taken down in Durham, N.C., this week.

The organization Coalition of Friends/Tubman House, which had helped to plan a “Do It Like Durham” event for Wednesday using the tagline, “Let’s tear down white supremacy and hate,” says it canceled the event after the statues were removed.

A grassroots coalition that had promoted the event, the Baltimore Bloc, used its Twitter feed to post videos of the statues being taken down on.

The statues have been removed nearly a year after a mayoral commission recommended taking down the public commemorations to Taney at Mount Vernon Place and to Lee and Jackson, who were depicted together on horseback in a monument in the Wyman Park Dell.

That commission had recommended keeping two other artifacts: the Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument on Mount Royal Avenue near Mosher Street and the Confederate Women’s of Maryland Monument at Bishop Square Park. But in the wake of the violence in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend, the city council voted to remove all four monuments.

Councilman Brandon Scott introduced the city’s measure, which called for “the immediate deconstruction of all Confederate Monuments in Baltimore so that they are unable to be placed on public display.”

A photo taken at the scene of the Taney monument Tuesday night shows an information placard titled “Reconciling History.” Behind it, the statue’s pedestal stands empty.

As NPR’s Colin Dwyer reports, the deadly violence in Charlottesville has given new momentum to many cities and states that are pushing to remove monuments to Confederate figures from prominent display.

Adding to the controversy, President Trump has made a series of statements about the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville that confused and angered many in the public and in the Republican Party.

Trump initially refused to assign blame for an act that resulted in a murder charge, prompting a flood of criticism. He then called out hate groups on Monday — but on Tuesday, the president reiterated his view that “there’s blame on both sides.”

Millions of Marylanders fought in the Civil War — and nearly three times as many fought for the Union than for the Confederacy. But as the mayoral commission noted, “Baltimore has three public monuments to the Confederacy and only one to the Union.”

 

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By Any Means Necessary…Take ’em Down

Cities and municipalities have tried to reach some common ground on the removal of confederate statues from public spaces – by allowing them on private ground.

That, as we saw in Charlottesville isn’t working out.

So… Cut to the chase. Take them down permanently with a sledgehammer or wrecking ball.

 

 

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Done Lit the Wrong Fuse…

The racist right and the Chumph are on the same page…

But they have miscalculated exactly how badly they are outnumbered.

 

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