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Scamming the System – Police Turn Off Body Cameras

05 Oct

Body cameras were supposed to be a big help in determining how situations between the Police and the public actually happened.

They would be – if the Cops didn’t turn them off.

Here is my solution –

  1. Any officer who doesn’t have his body camera turned on during a arrest or other citizen action unless there is a really good excuse…Should be immediately terminated from the force, and strongly considered for prosecution.
  2. Any video/sound, collected on a body camera, must be made Public within 90 days, if requested by an involved Citizen, his legal representative though a FOIA request.

Body Cameras Are Betraying Their Promise

They’re not transparent. They’re not independent. They’re not even turned on when they should be.

When they were introduced to the American public two years ago, police body-cameras seemed like they might help everyone. Police departments liked that body cams reduced the number of public complaints about officer behavior. Communities and protesters liked that they would introduce some transparency and accountability to an officer’s actions.

Today, research suggests that body cameras significantly reduce the number of public complaints about police. But recent events subvert the idea that the devices help or increase the power of regular people—that is, the policed. Instead of making officers more accountable and transparent to the public, body cameras may be making officers and departments more powerful than they were before.

This is happening across the country. And there are three trends that are repeating themselves over and over.

First, many officers are (either earnestly or conveniently) forgetting to activate their cameras when they’re supposed to. Take the case of Terrence Sterling, an unarmed 31-year-old black man who was fatally shot this month by local police officers in Washington, D.C., after his motorcycle crashed into their car. Contrary to District of Columbia policy, no officer at the scene activated their body camera until after the shooting. The city released footage of Sterling’s final moments this week—but that video begins more than a minute after shots were fired.

Also this week, The Washington Post revealed that an officer present at the shooting of Keith Scott, in Charlotte, North Carolina, did not activate his body camera when he should have. The officer only turned it on immediately after another officer at the scene shot Scott. Due to a feature of the camera that saves the 30 seconds of video prior to its activation, this meant that while the shots werecaptured on camera, the footage had no sound. (Dashboard-camera video released over the weekend seemed to show that Scott, a 43-year-old black man, had his hands by his side when another officer shot him four times and killed him.)

Or consult the case of Paul O’Neal, an unarmed 18-year-old black teenager who was shot and killed by a Chicago Police Department officer in late July. The officer’s body camera was also turned off during the shooting.

In case after case, police departments say officers did not have their body cameras activated when it counted. It can seem as though incidents where body-cam footage helped secure an indictment—such as in Marksville, Louisiana, last November, or as in Cincinnati last July—are more rare than the cases where they don’t.

These are breaches of protocol—incidents where events didn’t happen as the law would require. Often, these violations are never significantly punished. This is the second major threat to body-camera accountability: If there’s not significant discipline for officers who fail to follow local policies—as the officers failed in D.C., Chicago, and Charlotte—then it doesn’t matter what’s in the policy.

“Even if a department like Chicago has a great, green-check-mark policy, there are still lapses by officers,” said Harlan Yu, a technologist at Upturn, a civil-rights consulting firm. “In the Paul O’Neal shooting, cameras were on before, they appear to be on after, but then—oh well!—something happened” during the shooting itself.

“We see this in Chicago over and over in other areas—there are all sorts of stories about Chicago cops purposefully deactivating their dash cams, even though they’re required to use them and the city pays for them. But who is disciplining officers when they fail to follow the policies? If taxpayers are spending money on these cameras, they sure as hell better be working when a shooting happens,” he added.

The third threat is that many states have introduced or passed new laws that restrict public access to footage while preserving police access.

In October, North Carolina will enforce a new law that only allows courts, and not politicians, to release any body-camera footage. The law asks state judges to weigh various factors before releasing a video, including whether it is “necessary to advance a compelling public interest” and whether it would “create a serious threat to the fair, impartial, and orderly administration of justice.”

North Carolina is not the only state to restrict access to body-camera footage. The Urban Institute says that Illinois, Texas, South Carolina, and other states have all blocked the public’s access to it….Read the rest here

 

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2 Comments

Posted by on October 5, 2016 in BlackLivesMatter

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

2 responses to “Scamming the System – Police Turn Off Body Cameras

  1. lkeke35

    October 5, 2016 at 11:42 AM

    I would prefer some kind of setup where when the camera gets turned in in the evening or turned off, the footage automatically uploads to some independent server, somewhere. Or better yet, cameras that police officers simply can’t control, at all. They simply don’t have the ability to turn them off or on.

    Like

     
    • btx3

      October 5, 2016 at 4:30 PM

      Well…You are talking to the right guy. I am a bit of an expert at this, as I design Public Safety Systems for Fire/Police/Rescue as a “sideline”.

      The answer is, most of the radio systems currently deployed in the US at the local level can’t support high speed data transfer needed for that upload. It will be a 3 to 10 years before that is completely deployed, providing Congress and the FCC don’t stick their fingers in again to screw things up…Again.

      Liked by 1 person

       

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