Thief Tries to Snatch Raygun Statue

Some years ago there was an effort by the Rethugs to put Raygun’s mug on the $50 bill. Even they apparently figured out that was a dumb idea.

About a week ago, a non-profit which exists to put Raygun’s name on everything from baby wipes to tollway outhouses unveiled two new 10′ bronze statues, one in Newport Beach California, and the other disgracing our National Airport.

After the theft of a bronze church bell in San Francisco a few weeks ago, with the price or bronze scrap today – this ought to be fun!

Next Time might I suggest borrowing one of those tow trucks… And, not that I’m suggesting anything but… I just happen to know where there is an even bigger statute

A Leaning Raygun - After an Unsucessful Attempt by a Thief to Make off With the Statue worth $60,000 Melted down

Ronald Reagan statue in Calif. park vandalized

A bronze statue of former President Ronald Reagan was vandalized early Sunday, according to officials. Continue reading

National Disgrace

Back in the late 1990’s when Republicans were on their first disastrous campaign controlling Congress and setting the foundation for economic collapse, they bastardized the name of our National Airport between orgasms sniffing every little blue dress in town.

The so called Captains of returning authority to the States and local authorities used the very same Federal Government authority they constantly bemoan,  to jam the name of their hero, Ronald Raygun down the collective throats of the local citizenry and governments and affix it to our National Airport.

Many locals still refuse to use Raygun’s name when referring to the airport, preferring instead to use it’s real name – National Airport. You want to go to Reagan Airport – then you are on your way to Orange County, California.

Well, with the unveiling of yet another affront to the local citizenry – if you are flying with Fido, at least he has a better place to relieve himself than one of the local hydrants before being packed away for the long flight.

Elizabeth Dole; Ray LaHood and Charles Snelling take part in the unveiling of a statue of President Ronald Reagan. | AP Photo

The New Doggie Pit Stop at National Airport

Reagan Statue Unveiled at Namesake Airport Near DC

The 18 million passengers who travel in and out of the nation’s capital through Reagan National Airport each year will now be greeted by a 9-foot tall, nearly $1 million bronze statue of the former president that was unveiled Tuesday.

The statue is the fourth dedicated this year to commemorate the 100th anniversary of his birth by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation, which operates his presidential library. Tuesday’s unveiling also gave travelers an opportunity to revisit the dormant debate over whether Reagan was worthy of having his name put on the airport that had long been known simply as “National.”

Many D.C.-area residents resented the change when it was approved by Congress in 1998, and it seems the passage of 13 years has done little to soften people’s opinions.

“I’ve never understood the people who feel he’s such a beloved figure,” said Kathleen Meehan of Madison, Wis., as she waited for her flight. “My daughter refuses to call it ‘Reagan.'” The only thing Meehan gave Reagan credit for was “the destruction of the middle class.”

Jessica Denson of Washington said she continues to refer to it as “National.” Her travel partner, New Orleans resident Terry Scott, agreed.

“It’s crazy that they salivate over this guy like he was an angel. What’s next, canonization?” Scott asked. “It’s like John Wayne airport (in California). I won’t use John Wayne.”

But Carol Ole, who was headed back to Atlanta after watching her nephew run the Marine Corps Marathon, was thrilled to see the statue being unveiled.

“I love it. I’m a real conservative,” she said…

The Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority also spent about $80,000 on site preparations.

Some Issues With Martin Luther King Memorial Surface

Taking a few words at their meaning, out of context with the events, or in some cases hundreds of words surrounding them is a recipe for disaster. In particular, the Rev. Martin Luther King, whose speeches and collective will driven by the righteousness of our cause shook our national psyche to it’s very foundations, left us with a number or speeches and written words left us with a number of “quotable moments” which cannot be distilled without context.

My parents, being educators collected a number of King’s Speeches and much of his oratory on old 33 1/3 RPM records allowing us to go back and review and rehear his speeches, discussions, and debates again and again. I would guess that well North of several thousand published works document the Civil Rights period, making it, WWII, and the Great Depression the most documented and detailed events of the past century.

So it is a little distressing when they get it wrong on the Memorial…

At King ceremony, a chance to bend toward justice

 

The arc of a mistake is long, and it now stretches from the Oval Office over to the Mall.

An error has been etched in marble on the grand Martin Luther King Jr. memorial that was to be dedicated Sunday, on the 48th anniversary of King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. Some of King’s speeches and writings have been inscribed in the memorial. But one of the sayings on the wall by the Tidal Basin is incorrect — or incomplete — in its attribution.

“The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”

According to David Remnick’s biography of Obama, that is the president’s “favorite quotation.” Obama brought the idea back into present-day parlance and even had it sewn into the rug in the Oval Office when he redecorated last year. But as I wrote on this page last September, King is not the source of that quote. Continue reading

St. Louis Erects Statue Honoring Chuck Berry

He Could Play a Guitar Like Ringing a Bell….

Hail! Hail! Chuck Berry

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOGRAPHS "I don't know how to speak - I can sing a little bit," said Chuck Berry in remarks to a crowd gathered for the unveiling of a statue of himself at its dedication last Friday in University City, Mo., outside St. Louis.

Chuck Berry in his signature cap and tie.

The image is timeless Americana: Chuck Berry hunched over, ready to launch into his famous Duck Walk, picking his Gibson guitar and wailing a song.

It’s the image captured in the statue of the man considered by many to be the father of rock and roll, dedicated Friday in the University City Loop area of suburban St. Louis.

Mr. Berry, now 84, still performs monthly at Blueberry Hill, a club and restaurant across the street from the new statue. He spoke only briefly at the dedication ceremony on a sweltering day as hundreds paid tribute to the St. Louis native.

“I don’t know how to speak – I can sing a little bit,” Mr. Berry, wearing his signature captain’s hat and bolo tie, said after thanking people for braving the heat to come out. “I’m going to say thank you again, and I love you all.” Continue reading

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