Fox News AKA Faux News Fake Commenters

Sometimes on blog you get folks commenting who spew the Party line so exactly you have to wonder if they aren’t shills…

Turns out Faux News operatives have been behind some of that with a cadre of fake posters!

Fox News PR Used Fake Accounts To Push Back At Negative Commenters

Here’s an interesting bit of Fox News skullduggery from David Folkenflik’s new bookon Rupert Murdoch’s media empire, courtesy of Media Matters:

In a chapter focusing on how Fox utilized its notoriously ruthless public relations department in the mid-to-late 00′s, Folkenflik reports that Fox’s PR staffers would “post pro-Fox rants” in the comments sections of “negative and even neutral” blog posts written about the network. According to Folkenflik, the staffers used various tactics to cover their tracks, including setting up wireless broadband connections that “could not be traced back” to the network.From the book itself:

Fox PR staffers were expected to counter not just negative and even neutral blog postings but the anti-Fox comments beneath them. One former staffer recalled using twenty different aliases to post pro-Fox rants. Another had one hundred. Several employees had to acquire a cell phone thumb drive to provide a wireless broadband connection that could not be traced back to a Fox News or News Corp account.Folkenflik’s book has already roiled News Corp with its account of Wall Street Journal staffers who found their attempts to report on the company’s phone hacking scandal met with roadblock after roadblock. (The company denied the account.)

Members Quit Right Wing Extremist US Chamber of Commerce

The US Chamber of Commerce is a Joke – and a bad one at that. Long a Republican bastion, this last election, they became little more than Glen Beck and Karl Rove’s back door whores.

Glad to see at least a few of the local organizations have the cajones to stand up instead of being bent over and used.

Angry member groups shun U.S. Chamber of Commerce

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is under fire from some local chambers over its hard-hitting $75 million ad campaign to elect a Republican House, with dozens of groups distancing themselves from the effort and a handful even quitting the national group in protest.

“We were getting pounded. We felt here, in central Pennsylvania, that the ads they were running were not professional ads,” said David Wise, president of the Chamber of Business and Industry of Centre County, which is considering dropping its national membership. “This was not a unifying event. It was divisive.”

More than 40 local chambers issued statements during the midterms distancing themselves from the U.S. Chamber’s campaign — including nearly every major local chamber in Iowa and New Hampshire, key states for the presidential campaign.

Other chambers plan to take the extraordinary step of ending their affiliation with the U.S. Chamber.

The Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce in Pennsylvania was seriously considering dropping its affiliation with the national group after its leaders reported being inundated with angry — and sometimes profanity-laced — telephone calls from people objecting to the U.S. Chamber-backed ads, according to an official familiar with the internal discussions. On Wednesday, the Philadelphia group announced that it has decided to maintain its membership.

“We recognize value in that membership, and the services that they offer,” a statement read. “However, our positions are not dictated by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.”

At the Greater Seattle Chamber of Commerce in Washington, officials hope to avoid a similar discussion about nonrenewal of its membership. “What we’d prefer to do at this point is have conversations with the U.S. Chamber representatives, so we can be more respectful of each other’s constituencies,” said George Allen, senior vice president of government relations with the Seattle Chamber.

The U.S. Chamber prides itself on a take-no-prisoners approach to power in Washington. Community-based chambers generally operate in a manner that encourages bipartisanship and consensus while shunning the edgy partisanship that became the hallmark of the national office’s 2010 political strategy.

 

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