Washington Nationals Baseball Player Kidnapped in Venezuela

One of the things you have to deal with when working in certain parts of the world is kidnapping. This is particularly prevalent in Central and South America, and has even begun happening in Mexico and several Caribbean countries. There actually is “kidnapping insurance”, but that is little consolation as the kidnappers may or may not return the victim alive even if paid off.

Washington Nationals catcher Wilson Ramos kidnapped from home in Venezuela

WashingFILE - This 2011 file photo shows player Wilson Ramos of the Washington Nationals baseball team. According to Kathe Vilera, a spokeswoman for Ramos' Venezuelan League team, the Aragua Tigers, four armed men kidnapped Ramos Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011 from his home in central Venezuela. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, file)ton Nationals catcher Wilson Ramos was abducted by gunmen Wednesday from his home in his native Venezuela.

Ramos, 24, was taken away in an SUV by four armed men in Santa Ines in central Carabobo state, Kathe Vilera, spokeswoman for the catcher’s Venezuelan League team, said through her official Twitter account.

“This is sad, worrisome and true that Wilson Ramos has been kidnapped,” she said. Ramos was playing winter ball with the Aragua Tigers.

She said the rising Major League Baseball star was kidnapped at 6:45 p.m. local time (2315 GMT) and that police have been notified. Santa Ines lies about 150 kilometers (95 miles) west of Venezuela’s capital, Caracas.

A person close to Ramos’ family, who asked not to be named for safety reasons, said the catcher was at home with his father and brothers when several men “entered the house and took him away.”

“As of this hour, there has been no contact” between the kidnapper and Ramos’ family, the person said.

Ramos is considered one of the Nationals’ young building blocks as they try to become a contender in the National League East. As a rookie in 2011, he hit .267 with 15 homers and 52 RBIs in 113 games. He also threw out 19 of 67 runners attempting to steal a base, a 28 percent success rate that ranked third among qualifying catchers in the National League.

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