Sly Stone Homeless

Sly smoked all the money…

Homeless Sly Stone Living in Camper, Still Recording Music

Sly Stone

Sad news out of today’s New York Post: Sly Stone, the mastermind behind the legendary psychedelic soul-funk outfit Sly & the Family Stone, has been reduced to living in a van in Los Angeles, eating meals given to him by a retired couple.

As the Post reports, the musician born Sylvester Stewart has been plagued by drug abuse and bad financial decisions. Back in the ’80s, he sold Michael Jackson his publishing rights for $1 million, and last year, he filed a $50 million lawsuit against manager Jerry Goldstein, who he claims cheated him out of two decades of royalty payments. Earlier this year, he was arrested for possession of freebase cocaine.

Since his heyday in the late ’60s and early ’70s — when he scored hits with such songs as ‘Everyday People’ and ‘Family Affair’ — Stone has been one of music’s most notorious recluses. After a performance in 1987, he disappeared from the public eye, resurfacing 19 years later for a brief, head-scratching cameo at a 2006 Grammy tribute. He toured Europe the following year, but according to the Post, he’s now a “disheveled, paranoid” shell of his former self.

On the bright side, Stone has been recording new music, and while he’s hesitant to trust managers or record labels, there’s still a chance his new songs will see the light of day.

“My music is a format that will encourage you to have a song you won’t forget,” he told the Post. “That’s why I got so much money, that there are so many people around, and that’s why I am in court. Millions of dollars!”

“But now please tell everybody, please, to give me a job, play my music,” he added. “I’m tired of all this s–t, man.”

Eric Sheptock, Homeless Advocate for the Homeless

Meet Eric Sheptock, who lives on the streets in Washington, DC, and is a homeless advocate using the power of the Internet to get the message about the homeless out…

D.C’s ‘homeless homeless’ advocate

Eric Sheptock has 4,548 Facebook friends, 839 Twitter followers, two blogs and an e-mail account with 1,600 unread messages.

What he doesn’t have is a place to live.

“I am a homeless homeless advocate,” he often tells people. That’s the line that hooks them, the one that gives Sheptock – an unemployed former crack addict who hasn’t had a permanent address in 15 years – his clout on the issue of homelessness. Continue reading

Formerly Homeless – Now Harvard Bound!

Every once in a while, some good things happen to folks who wouldn’t otherwise seem to have a chance in life. This one is a congratulations and  Good Luck to Khadijah Williams!

Khadijah Willaims at Graduation

Khadijah Willaims at Graduation

Khadijah Williams, 18, overcomes a lifetime in shelters and on skid row.
By Esmeralda Bermudez
11:03 PM PDT, June 19, 2009

Khadijah Williams stepped into chemistry class and instantly tuned out the commotion.

She walked past students laughing, gossiping, napping and combing one another’s hair. Past a cellphone blaring rap songs. And past a substitute teacher sitting in a near-daze.

Quietly, the 18-year-old settled into an empty table, flipped open her physics book and focused. Nothing mattered now except homework.

“No wonder you’re going to Harvard,” a girl teased her.

Around here, Khadijah is known as “Harvard girl,” the “smart girl” and the girl with the contagious smile who landed at Jefferson High School only 18 months ago.

What students don’t know is that she is also a homeless girl.

As long as she can remember, Khadijah has floated from shelters to motels to armories along the West Coast with her mother. She has attended 12 schools in 12 years; lived out of garbage bags among pimps, prostitutes and drug dealers. Every morning, she upheld her dignity, making sure she didn’t smell or look disheveled.

On the streets, she learned how to hunt for their next meal, plot the next bus route and help choose a secure place to sleep — survival skills she applied with passion to her education.

Only a few mentors and Harvard officials know her background. She never wanted other students to know her secret — not until her plane left for the East Coast hours after her Friday evening graduation.

“I was so proud of being smart I never wanted people to say, ‘You got the easy way out because you’re homeless,’ ” she said. “I never saw it as an excuse.”…

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