Conservatives New War Against Black Folks

One of the popular screeds among a sect of the conservative hegemony, is that the name of the NAACP is at issue because of the “Colored Peoples”. One needs to ask if one is to use this literal saw, if the Daughters of the American Revolution, and Sons of Confederate Veterans might not also be misnomered. Since there quite simply aren’t any daughters of American Revolutionaries or sons of Confederates alive today. To be precise, might not that be the Great-Great-great-great-Gandaughters of the American Revolution, and Great-Great-Great-Grandsons of the Confederacy?

I mean, like the term x-American, “hyphenated Americans” only became an issue and distasteful AFTER black folks claimed the term African-American to conservatives. Nary a peep about the hundreds of German-American, Irish-American, Italian-American, Polish-American etc. organizations which span the country. But African-American? Wow – to a certain racially misguided sect of conservatives – “Dem’s fighting words!”

Amazing is Glenn beck’s “discovery” that there actually is a black history in America. I suppose he believed prior to that point A-A’s appeared magically sometime between the Brown decision, and King’s 1963 March on Washington. Yeah I know – the great alien “motherships” converged over every city in America, and unlike the Movie “Independence Day”…

Instead of raining sown destruction on every city and metropolis, rained down freshly minted black folks to destroy the picture perfect urban havens!

It would seem that the “Culture Wars” promulgated by social conservatives have devolved into the war on black folks (as well as Hispanics)…

By the not so social conservatives.

Next up is the use of “Avatars”, in this case black conservatives – in this case attacking “Lift Every Voice and Sing”

Professor at historically black college questions ‘black national anthem’

“Lift Every Voice and Sing” is an uplifting spiritual, one that’s often heard in churches and popularly recognized as the black national anthem. Timothy Askew grew up with its rhythms, but now the song holds a contentious place in his mind.

“I love the song,” said Askew, an associate professor of English at Clark Atlanta University, a historically black college. “But it’s not the song that is the problem. It’s the label of the song as a ‘black national anthem’ that creates a lot of confusion and tension.”

The song and its message of struggle and hope have long been attached to the African-American community. It lives on as a religious hymn for several protestant and African-American denominations and was quoted by the Rev. Joseph E. Lowery at Barack Obama’s presidential inauguration.

After studying the music and lyrics of the song and its history for more than two decades, Askew decided the song was intentionally written with no specific reference to any race or ethnicity. Continue reading

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