Chicken-Diddle. Mary J. Blige Burger King Ad

Things that make you go Hmmmmm…

Now … Why exactly is this one “racist” and the black Popeyes commercials aren’t?

Mary J. Blige

Mary J. Blige’s Burger King commercial pulled

Mary J. Blige’s Burger King commercial, which featured the Grammy-winning R&B star singing about chicken, has been pulled off the air.

The fast-food chain is blaming music licensing issues, not criticism of the ad, for the decision to pull it.

The ad, which features Blige singing soulfully about chicken wraps, premiered this week.

But as the video went viral, some in the black community criticized the ad as stereotypical. The black women-oriented website Madame Noire likened it to “buffoonery.”

Burger King said Tuesday the commercial was pulled because of a licensing concern. The company said it hopes to have the Blige “ads back on the air soon,” though a spokeswoman would not comment on whether they ads would be the same.

The spokeswoman also noted that other celebrities, including Salma Hayek and Jay Leno, also are advertising the snack wraps.

A rep for Blige did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

What’s the Deal With the New Benetton Ads?

See the rest here. Benetton better have some serious insurance on their stores…

Benetton ‘Unhate’ Campaign Shows World Leaders Kissing

There’s no doubt that these are the pictures of the day. U.S. President Barack Obama kissing his Venezuelan counterpart Hugo Chavez, Mahmoud Abbas embracing Benjamin Netanyahu, and Germany’s Angela Merkel locking lips with Nicolas Sarkozy. Is this bad fan fiction? A new approach to international diplomacy?

The stunning (albeit photoshopped) images are part of a new campaign by the United Colors of Benetton. Alessandro Benetton, executive deputy chairman, who presented the ads in Paris on Wednesday, said they were meant to promote the idea of “unhate,” The Times Of India writes. “The images are very strong, but we have to send a strong message. We are not wanting to be disrespectful of the leaders … we consider them “conception figures” making a statement of brotherhood with a kiss,” he reportedly said.

Benetton hopes the campaign will contribute to the creation of a culture of tolerance and combat hatred, the group writes. It plans a series of live actions in which young people will post the images of the smooching world leaders “on the walls of locations symbolic of the desperately-needed peace process: Tel Aviv, New York, Rome, Milan, Paris.”

There have already been fierce reactions to the controversial shots. According to the Belgian news channel RTL, President of the Italian Association for Catholic Viewers Luca Borgomeo asked for the immediate withdrawal of the campaign. “Is it possible that RTL can’t think of anything better?” he said, according to a HuffPost translation.

“The White House has a longstanding policy disapproving of the use of the president’s name and likeness for commercial purposes,” White House spokesman Eric Schultz told The Huffington Post.

Benetton is known for its controversial ads, including one of a young nun kissing a priest.

 

Huntsman Daughters Parody Cain Commercial

The Jon2012Girls jump in with a parody of Herman Cain’s smoking video. Candidate Jon Huntsman’s daughters have posted a parody on YouTube hitting back at Cains ridiculous and pathetic ad.

No word yet on whether the Cain grandchildren will strike back.

Can the Huntsman girls burst Cain’s bubble? 

If policy speeches and retail campaigning don’t work, there are always fake mustaches and bubbles.

Eager to find its way into any story line, the Jon Huntsmancampaign is up with a new Web video parodying the viral Herman Cain spot featuring his smoke-blowing campaign manager.

It features three of Huntsman’s daughters — the “Jon2012girls” — wearing thick-rimmed eyeglasses and terrible, terrible fake mustaches in an attempt to mimic the bizarre Cain video.

“We strongly believe that our dad has the experience and proven track record to revive America’s economy and create jobs. Even if we didn’t believe that, we’d still have to be here,” says one of the girls.

It ends with the three girls blowing bubbles, not smoke as Mark Block did in his version. It also borrows Cain’s catchy campaign anthem.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 145 other followers