Black Conservative – Just Say No to Beck

One of the things the overheated racial rhetoric from the Tea Bagger right seems to be doing is clarifying the issues between black folks and conservatives. Even conservative and Republican black folks, with 20/200 vision – are beginning to read the handwriting on the wall.

In this article, a black conservative explains why he won’t be onstage for the Beckapalooza…

Why This Conservative Won’t Be at Glenn Beck’s Rally

I understand why some black conservatives feel the need to participate in the Restoring Honor event in Washington, D.C. However, I have declined the invitation.

It could have been an honor to attend. It would have been something to tell my grandchildren about one day. I could have said that I participated in a historic event —  Glenn Beck’s Restoring Honor rally that will be a notable point in the story of the Tea Party movement in America.

Instead, I felt that I had a greater obligation to history — the Aug. 28, 1963, “I Have a Dream” rally in Washington, D.C. — than I had to being present in Washington, D.C., this Aug. 28.

For me, it was clear why I — and perhaps many other black conservatives — had to say no.  I understand that there are some who will participate in the rally on Saturday. For example, anti-abortion Dr. Alveda King (niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.) will be one of the featured speakers.

The Frederick Douglass Foundation will attend the rally as “esteemed” guests, sitting on the speakers’ stage, primarily in support of King. I get this. It is important that pro-life advocates grab advantageous platforms to address and eradicate the black genocide via abortion in our communities — and since the political left is not willing to provide an opportunity to address these grievances, opportunities such as Saturday’s will have to do.

Yet for me, after former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin’s defense of Dr. Laura during the “n-word” controversy and Glenn Beck’s feigned gratitude to “divine providence” for picking the Aug. 28 date, it just seems historically improper for most black conservatives to acquiesce to the spirit of this event, particularly as some of the principal personalities involved have long sidestepped the crisis in black America today — the very issues that King spoke to back in Aug. 1963. Continue reading

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