No Black State of the Union

What Will Replace Tavis Smiley’s State of the Black Union?

Tavis’ conference created conversation, but those conversations are moot without action. What is our next step for moving from conversation to action? For some like Minister Patrick Shaffer in Chicago, action means putting together HIV-awareness activities for our communities so that we can burst the bubble of silence that is leading to death and hopelessness. For others, such as Pauline Feimster in Charlotte, N.C., it means leading the charge for the Pride Entrepreneur Education Program that ensures that worthy students get encouragement from corporate and private leadership, access to opportunity and scholarship money.

For us all—particularly at this critical time—it means doing what Washington has not done but what Tavis’ SOBU attempted: working together across ideological, socioeconomic and geographic lines in order to improve America—particularly black America. The bashing of black Republicans who bring suggestions to the table to improve our communities must end. At the same time, the amnesic and condescending attitudes of certain black Republicans toward the black community must also cease. The political and social viability of black America is at stake and is too valuable to be a casualty of political and ideological wars.

We must work to restore a greater sense of community among black professionals and those with resources to invest in our struggling urban environments. The toxic credos of underclass black America that denigrate common sense and common decency need to be retired so that the groundwork for prosperity and change can take root. Perhaps a new set of bipartisan black politicos can create the policy bridges that allow these two groups to find common ground.

The growing apathy toward social conditions that is again hurting black America (despite having a black president) must be replaced with a passion for change among our diverse people, from academia and the ministry to civics and business. As the State of the Black Union showed, we are not at a point where we can segment our talent into silos, fail to communicate with each other well and not exchange ideas for solutions. We must share the stage, push each other with respect and fight for black America with a sense of honor and togetherness that has been lost on our younger generations. We must be infected with a sense of history and immune to the HNIC syndrome.

We will disagree on the methods and solutions, but we must not be afraid to find the energy it takes to move a culture of millions past a dark time in our history. With the door of Tavis’ conference closed, the window of opportunity for a new generation of black leaders has opened. We need a new level of political savvy and balance, a new activism that looks primarily within ourselves for solutions and a new paradigm of leadership—particularly within young black America. We must work to create a union that is more perfect in the days to come.

About these ads

2 Responses

  1. What happened to Tavis? I don’t care that he has criticism for the President, but there is a bitterness that seems to rage in him that has caused him to lose all perspective.

    • Not sure, but it seems to be impacting his support level among academics, who were his core group in making the B-STU relevant, producing a good deal of new thought and analysis. I was interested, not for what the old dogs were saying – but from the standpoint there are a number of new, young researchers and thought leaders who are doing some serious work.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 146 other followers

%d bloggers like this: